"In writing fiction, the more fantastic the tale, the plainer the prose should be. Don't ask your readers to admire your words when you want them to believe your story." - Ben Bova [ more quotes ]

"WITNESS"

by

Earl W. Wallace

William Kelley

Pamela Wallace



EXT. LANCASTER COUNTY, PA. COUNTRYSIDE DAY

TITLE SEQUENCE

The faces of several young children are presented in CLOSEUP,
as they walk TOWARD US across a ploughed field. On the SOUND
TRACK, the haunting SOUNDS OF A GREGORIAN FUNERAL CHANT. The
CAMERA PANS UP to the faces of older brothers and sisters,
then to parents and grandparents. These are not familiar
faces, but faces from another age, strong and open. All are
dressed in the distinctive clothing of the Amish.

EXT. COUNTRY LANE DAY

Through the last traces of early morning mist another group
of black-clad figures make their way down a lane.

EXT. COUNTRY LANE DAY

An Amish buggy, black and highwheeled, stark against the
landscape, appears, a spirited chestnut in the traces.

Framed in the glass window of the narrow buggy is the stern
figure of an Amish man in black topcoat and flatbrimmed hat,
his bonneted wife in muted colors, the face of a boy, attired
like his father, peering out.

The horse's breath smokes on the frosty air, the buggy CREAKS
on its springs, and there's the rhythmic CLIP-CLOP OF HOOVES
on the pavement.

ANOTHER LANE

Two Amish buggies reach a crossroads, join a procession of
three others. They disappear as the lane wends through a
leafless thicket of hickory.

VALLEY

A BIG SHOT... now the procession numbers almost a dozen
buggies... it is headed toward a distant farmhouse.

BARNYARD

Where literally dozens of carriages are parked. The horses
have been taken from the traces, removed to the shelter of
the barn.

EXT. LAPP FARMHOUSE FRONT PORCH

As the black clad mourners begin to move into the house (women
and children presumably first).

INT. LAPP FARMHOUSE

The coffin has the upper half open. We see that the corpse
has been dressed in white linen, a piece of white linen
partially covering the bearded face.

END TITLE SEQUENCE

INT. LAPP FARMHOUSE

Partitions have been removed, making the central rooms of
the farmhouse a spacious hall. The place is packed, a hundred-
fifty or more Amish, all sitting in absolute silence on rows
of wooden benches. A wooden coffin rests on a bench in the
f.g., and near it the close relatives of the deceased occupy
a special Place.

RACHEL LAPP

A young woman of perhaps twenty-seven. Her face is pale and
drawn.

In happier circumstances, although there haven't been too
many of late in Rachel's life, we would see a robust, sensual
woman of full figure, spirit and intelligence.

Eight-year-old SAMUEL LAPP flits next to his mother; he would
appear stunned, possibly not entirely comprehending events.

And the patriarch, ELI LAPP; his stubborn, weathered yet
not unkind features grief-stricken.

THE MOURNERS

Their faces...

CLOCK

As it begins to CHIME nine a.m.

FAVORING PREACHER

As he removes his hat. As one, the men in the congregation
remove their hats also.

Then the preacher begins to speak in a formal German dialect:

SUBTITLES OVER.

PREACHER
...a brother has been called home.
God has spoken through the death of
our neighbor, Jacob Lapp...

THE FAMILY

Where Rachel, Samuel and Eli are SITTING - SOUNDS of emotion
and grief not quite suppressed are heard throughout as:

PREACHER
...husband of Rachel, father to
Samuel, son of Eli.
(and)
His chair is empty, his bed is empty,
his voice will be heard no more. He
was needed in our presence, but God
needs such men, too. That one should
be taken so suddenly. Treat sorrow.
Still, we would not wish him back.
Rather we should prepare ourselves
to follow him.

TIGHTENING to the Lapps, and...

EXT. CEMETERY

The mourners have gathered about the grave, standing in
silence as four pallbearers are lowering the coffin into the
pit. The many buggies are aligned in the b.g.

As the pallbearers begin to shovel soil and gravel into the
grave, the Preacher begins to read a hymn in German... a
slow atonal litany which seems to hang forever on the frosty
air.

RACHEL

TIGHTENING to her as the hymn continues...

CUT TO:

INT. LAPP FARMHOUSE

Where the Amish have gathered for the traditional post
funeral, midday meals.

Long tables are laden with customary Amishfare... crocks of
soup, hams, fowl, fried boiled eggs and pickled beets,
preserves and an infinite variety of pies and pastries.

RACHEL

Where she sits among women, accepting their condolences.

DANIEL HOCHSTETLER

A brawny-armed, ruggedly-handsome, raffish looking Amishman.
There is something atypical about his face a slightly sardonic
set of mouth, a bold eye, a prominent set of jaw. Not exactly
what old Jacob Ammann had in mind, maybe, but a well set-up
man nonetheless, and at ease among men. He's among a group
of men including old STOLTZFUS, the local healer, FISHER,
BIEILER and Bieiler's stout young son, Tom.

STOLTZFUS
Lapp was a good farmer. None better.

BEILER
But not the man to buy a horse for
you.
(and)
Hochstetler, wasn't it your father
sold him that horse with a ruptured
testicle?

TOM
(grins)
Told him it was a bee sting made him
limp that way.

HOCHSTETLER
(amused)
That horse had one good ball. That's
all it takes.

The others chuckle. But Hochstetler's attention is still on
Rachel.

RACHEL

As Hochstetler looms on the horizon, plants himself like a
tree in front of her.

At ease as he was with the men, he's a bit awkward at this.
All the women, very much aware of Hochstetler's availability,
tune in as Rachel looks up.

HOCHSTETLER
I was sorry to hear about Jacob. Let
us hope he walks close with God.

RACHEL
I'm sure he does, Daniel.

FIELDS, LAPP FARM DAY

It is some time after the funeral and the Lapp family is
hard at work breaking ground for the spring ploughing. The
death of Jacob has increased the work load on all three
Samuel maneuvers a four-mule team while Rachel and old Eli
work nearby, further breaking up the earth. Rachel looks up
from the back-breaking labor as several figures approach
it's Daniel Hochstetler and two of his brothers. Without a
word they fall in beside Eli and Rachel and take up various
tasks associated with the work in hand.

Daniel works close beside Rachel.

EXT. COUNTRY ROADS, LANCASTER COUNTY DAY

A few BRIEF SHOTS of a lone buggy containing the Lapp family
take us from the 18th century into the 20th century the
reassuring RATTLE OF THE CARRIAGE WHEELS on quiet backroad,
to the ROAR OF TRAFFIC as the buggy waits patiently for a
chance to cross a busy interstate highway.

EXT. HIGHWAY, LANCASTER COUNTY DAY

A huge tractor trailer rig hovers over the frail buggy as it
trots down the interstate. The camera cranes up to reveal a
procession of vehicles behind the truck for a chance to
overtake it.

EXT. PLATFORM, LANCASTER STATION DAY

Daniel Hochstetler moves through the crowd on the plat-form,
Rachel turns surprised, as he approaches, a faint color coming
to her cheek.

RACHEL
Daniel?

HOCHSTETLER
I... I was at the feed store. And I
saw your horse, so...

There is an embarrassment between them broken by the arrival
of the train.

HOCHSTETLER
You will come back soon?

Samuel can barely contain his excitement as he drags at his
mother's hand.

SAMUEL
Quickly, Mother Quickly!

Rachel embraces Eli.

ELI
You be careful out among them English.

She turns to Hochstetler.

RACHEL
I need time, Daniel.

EXT. CARPARK, LANCASTER STATION DAY

Daniel Hochstetler leaps into the driving seat of his open
wagon and with a flick of the reins and a whoop sets his
horse off at a fast trot.

EXT. TRAIN DAY

The ENGINE gives a WARNING BLAST before creeping slowly
forward.

INT. TRAIN (MOVING)

As Samuel spots something out of the window that causes him
to light up.

SAMUEL
Look, Mama...!

HIS POV THROUGH WINDOW

A road runs parallel to the train track, and Hochstetler in
his wagon urges his horse almost to the gallop as he attempts
to keep pace with the train.

BACK TO SCENE

As Rachel smiles.

RACHEL
I see, darling.

And Samuel cranes to look back, waving, for as long as he
can.

EXT. LANCASTER COUNTRYSIDE DAY

The train moves across a broad panorama of fields, dotted
with dolls'-house-sized farms and the tiny figures of Amish
farmers working their horse-drawn equipment.

SERIES OF CUTS

As the train continues its eastward journey... Samuel stares
raptly out of the window at the changing patterns of the
countryside. He points in wonder at a brightly colored hot
air balloon as it drifts slowly over timbered hills... he
looks unsure as the pattern of field and wood gives way to
suburbs, bustling shopping centers, restaurants, car lots
and fast food outlets.

EXT. PHILADELPHIA SLUMS

As the train travels past dilapidated row houses, streets
choked with cars and the gutters with filth.

INT. TRAIN (MOVING)

Now Samuel is staring out the window with some confusion,
almost apprehension:

SAMUEL
Is this where we're going?

RACHEL
Of course not. We're going to
Baltimore. It's much nicer in
Baltimore.

And Rachel draws her son closer, turning her back on the
window.

INT. 30TH ST. STATION, PHILADELPHIA DAY

Rachel is in a line at one of the counters. The plain dress
of the two Amish particularly Samuel's black coat and hat
are drawing curious stares.

SAMUEL

He's uncomfortably aware of the shy looks and giggles of a
little girl about his own age, standing in line with her
parents at the next counter. He edges away from his mother...

ANGLE

As Samuel comes upon a figure garbed in a long black frock
coat and flat-brimmed hat... the man's back is turned, could,
from appearances, be an Amishman.

Samuel stares... A beat, the man turns to face Samuel and we
discover that he is a Hasidic Jew.

SAMUEL

As he reacts.

BACK TO TICKET COUNTER

As Rachel's turn arrives. The TICKET SELLER glances up and
she shows him her ticket.

RACHEL
We have a ticket to Baltimore. Where
is that train, please?

TICKET SELLER
Delayed three hours. You'll hear an
announcement when it's time to board.

He starts to go without his hat, but Rachel collars him and
puts it on his head.

ANGLE IN MEN'S ROOM

As Samuel enters.

It's a long row of sinks, urinals, and stalls... Samuel stops
before one of the urinals a long, trough-like affair with
water drizzling down the rear porcelain panel.

It's set a little high for Samuel, and it is making GLUGGING
FLUSHING NOISES that are, at least, intimidating. Samuel
stares for a moment, then turns, looks toward the stalls,
stoops to see which are empty.

HIS POV TOILETS

Beneath the row of doors we can see no feet visible. Samuel
is alone in the restroom.

BACK TO SCENE

As Samuel proceeds along the row of door, finally selects a
stall near the end. He enters. As he does so, a heavily
bearded youth in a dirty sweatshirt enters. With some urgency,
he removes small notebook from his pocket and places it behind
a paper towel dispenser. Suddenly he glances up.

Two other men have entered the men's room; one is a large
BLACK MAN in a three-piece suit under an expensive, overcoat.
His PARTNER is a Caucasian in designer jeans, half boots and
a short leather jacket.

They advance on the young man with unmistakable menace.

The young man whirls in terror; his two assailants lunge for
him... a savage, wordless struggle ensues in the close
confines of the lavatory.

ANGLE IN SAMUEL'S STALL

As the struggling men bounce off the door of his stall... he
can see their feet under the edge of the door.

BACK TO FIGHT

As the struggle builds to a climax... ends with the young
man stiffening with a grunt, his face draining of color.

The two attackers step away, the blade in the black man's
hand bloodstained. His partner stares at what they've
accomplished with a stunned expression:

PARTNER
Jesus...

The young man's hand comes away from his belly covered with
blood.

He stares at it, staggers toward the sinks. Finally his
bloodied hand reaches to smear at his face in the mirror.
Then he collapses to the floor.

The black man motions for his partner to watch the door,
then quickly reaches up and removes the notebook from behind
the dispenser.

ANGLE IN SAMUEL'S STALL

As he edges open the stall door a crack. Over his shoulder
we can see the black man, his BACK TO US, rifling the
backpack. But beyond him, in the mirror on the far wall, we
catch sight of the black man's face.

SAMUEL

As he stares out the narrow crack. A beat, then he closes
the stall door.

ANGLE IN STALL

Samuel tries to make the latch work, but it's warped and
won't fall closed.

BLACK MAN

As he checks the notebook before placing it in his pocket.
His partner is covering the door, an automatic in his hand.

The black man makes for the exit, then on second thought,
glances at the row of stalls.

HIS POV STALLS

All quiet, but...

BACK TO SCENE

The black man whips out a .38 caliber revolver, and, starting
at the near end, starts pushing open the stall doors.

ANGLE IN SAM'S STALL

As the black man approaches, Samuel working desperately on
the latch. At the last minute he finally wedges it in.

BLACK MAN

He elbows Samuel's stall... the door won't open.

ANGLE IN SAM'S STALL

Fighting back panic, Samuel has retreated as far as he can.

BLACK MAN

As he gives the door a kick. It holds. He swears under his
breath.

ANGLE IN SAM'S STALL

In desperation, Samuel does the only thing he can think of...
he slips under the partition into the neighboring stall the
black man just checked out. But he loses his hat in the
process. His hand snakes back INTO FRAME to snatch it just
as the black man gives the door a ferocious kick that
splinters the lock and nearly takes it off its hinges. He's
framed there, the big muzzle of the .38 revolver looking
down our throats.

ANGLE

As his partner snaps from the doorway:

PARTNER
Will you come on, for Christ's sakes!

A beat, then the black man holsters his weapon, turns to
follow the partner out.

BACK TO SAMUEL

As we hear the SOUND OF THE TWO MEN EXITING the lavatory. A
long beat, then Samuel opens the stall door a crack.

HIS POW THROUGH DOOR

Samuel's own face reflected in the blood-smeared mirror...
then PANNING DOWN to the still figure of the young man lying
in the crimson pool of his own blood on the floor.

BENCH WAITING ROOM LOW ANGLE NIGHT

Samuel sits close to his mother, his face pale, his eyes
staring.

Rachel holds his hand tightly in hers as the torsos of various
police and officials pass through foreground, occasionally
obscuring the lonely couple. There is considerable ECHOING
NOISE as commands and requests mingle with the CRACKLE OF
TWO-WAY RADIOS.

CUT TO:

DOOR MEN'S' ROOM

The diffused shape of faces behind the frosted glass of the
Men's room door, which is pushed open to reveal, JOHN BOOK,
who comes striding through to be momentarily lost in the
crowd of police, reporters and others. He is about 40, with
a rangy, athletic body. Behind him comes CARTER, Book's black
partner about five years younger than Book. Book is wearing
a suit, Carter is much more casually almost disreputably
dressed.

CUT TO:

BENCH

Little Samuel watching Book, back to crowd of police, as
Book questions an old black CUSTODIAN.

BOOK
You found the body?

CUSTODIAN
Uh uh. Not me, daddy, I just reported
it. It was the kid.

BOOK
What kid?

CUSTODIAN
How'n hell do I know what kid? The
kid in the funny black threads.

TIGHT SHOT SAMUEL

Worry-eyed, still staring straight ahead. Then his eyes move
suddenly to his left.

BOOK'S LEGS SAMUEL'S POV

Coming in at full stride, then stopping.

SAMUEL

He doesn't raise his eyes... just looks at the legs. And,
slowly, the legs begin to bend at the knees. We see Book's
belt buckle, then his big pistol in its holster, then his
face. He stares at Samuel for a moment, then...

ANGLE BOOK

As his face breaks into a big grin, and...

BOOK
Hi, kid.

RACHEL

Immediately alarmed, intervening.

RACHEL
What do you want of my son?

THE SCENE

As Book takes out his wallet, displays his shield.

BOOK
I'm a police officer. I'm going to
have to talk to the boy. What's his
name?

RACHEL
Samuel. Samuel Lapp.
(then, quickly)
But what happened here is none of
his affair. My sister is expecting
me... our train is leaving soon.

BOOK
There'll be another train.
(turns to Samuel)
The man who was killed tonight was a
policeman, Sam. It's my job to find
out who did it. I want you to tell
me everything you saw when you went
in there.

SAMUEL
(stammers)
I saw him.

BOOK
Who'd you see?

Sam looks at his mother.

BOOK
Who'd you see, Sam? The man on the
floor?

SAMUEL
No... I saw the man who killed him.

Book stares at him in surprise, speaks over his shoulder to
Carter.

BOOK
Anybody know about this?

CARTER
I didn't even know about it.

BOOK
(back to Sam)
Okay, Sam. Can you tell me what he
looked like?

SAMUEL
(groping, touching
his clothes and
pointing at Carter)
He was... like him.

BOOK
(nods)
Black... I understand. What else,Sam?

A beat, then Sam crosses quickly to Carter, Book's rather
slightly built partner:

SAMUEL
Not Zwartich, like him

Book frowns, puzzled:

BOOK
Try that one again, Sam

Samuel gives his mother a helpless look; exasperated, Rachel
intervenes with Book. She glances at Carter:

RACHEL
May I talk to you?

ANGLE

As Rachel takes Book aside, and in a low voice:

RACHEL
Zwartich. It's the way we say...
dwarf.
(glances at Carter)
Not like him... very big.

Book nods, starts to turn back to Sam. Just then a commotion
off screen catches his attention.

BOOK'S POV ONCOMING COPS

It's Capt. TERRY DONAHUE, Chief of Homicide, striding past
the crowd of journalists and TV crews... brushing off
reporters' questions and snapping orders to the aides he's
got in tow:

BACK TO SCENE

AS DONAHUE COMES ON BOOK:

DONAHUE
(to aides)
Close it all down... I want a man on
every exit... I want the lab in here
now!
(to Book)
And I want to talk to you, Captain.

ANGLE

As Book steps aside with Donahue... In the b.g. Rachel moves
protectively to Samuel's side.

BOOK
All right, talk.

DONAHUE
This is homicide not Internal
Affairs! So why are you behaving
like you own this case?

BOOK
We were running Zenovitch... That's
all I can tell you. But I want it,
Terry.
(then)
I've got a call into Schaeffer.

RACHEL / SAMUEL

They can't help but watch the confrontation between Donahue
and Book... although they're keeping the volume down, it's
obviously intense and angry:

SAMUEL
(alarmed)
Momma... are they angry with us.

RACHEL
(reassuring, but hardly
in her own mind)
No... No. It is just the English
way.

Donahue has lost the confrontation; he gives Book a smile:

DONAHUE
You ought to think about coming back
to Homicide, Johnny... Stick with
Internal Affairs and you're not gonna
have any friends left.

BOOK
(smiles right back)
I'll buy a dog.

EXT. 30TH ST. STATION NIGHT

Book emerges from the terminal, looks about him, then crosses
to a big Mercury Sedan which is parked nearby. Two men sit
in the front seat. Book crosses to the driver's side and
opens the door.

BOOK
Go get a cup of coffee, Stan.

The driver, a uniformed policeman, glances at the man beside
him who nods in agreement. He gets out and Book gets in behind
the wheel.

INT. SEDAN

Book sits next to SCHAEFFER, a surprisingly kindly looking
man of about fifty. Schaeffer is a Deputy Chief.

SCHAEFFER
How reliable is this kid?

BOOK
Oh, he's good.

SCHAEFFER
Amish.

BOOK
Yeah.

SCHAEFFER
What have you got?

BOOK
Zenovitch was about to deliver a
list of names tonight street
chemists... the guys processing this
P2P into speed.

SCHAEFFER
So one of them got to him.

BOOK
Maybe.

SCHAEFFER
You know who?

BOOK
Maybe.

SCHAEFFER
You're still convinced there's a
link to the department?

BOOK
If there isn't I've just wasted the
last six months.

SCHAEFFER
That's the problem. We need results.
The press is driving us crazy over
this P2P thing. Calling us the 'speed
capitol of the country'. You know
the sort of thing. It's getting
political. The Commissioner's getting
very uneasy.

BOOK
The Amish boy saw him, Paul. I'll
make it, but Set Donahue and the
Homicide Department off my back or
they'll blow the whole thing.

SCHAEFFER
When word gets out that Zenovitch
was a cop, all hell will break lose.
You've got 24 hours. That's all I
can give you. 24 hours on your own.
After that the case and the witness
go back to the Homicide Department.

SCHAEFFER
(shakes his head)
Tell you what... why don't you and
that blonde what's-her-name come
over for dinner Sunday. How 'bout
that.

BOOK
What's-her-name moved to Buffalo.

SCHAEFFER
(sighs)
Well, anyway, don't get crazy.
(dismisses him)
I'll do something for Zenovich's
wife.

INT. BOOK'S CAR (MOVING) PHILADELPHIA NIGHT

Book drives around 13th Street, a ravaged corridor between
neon lit restaurants, bars, porno shops and darkened
storefronts.

Carter sits beside him, Rachel and her son in the back seat
looking out at the assorted array of desperate characters
huddled in doorways or wandering aimlessly about. On the
POLICE RADIO a description of the cop killing is BROADCAST
EVERY FEW MINUTES.

CARTER
I got there late, John.

BOOK
Let's just find Coalmine.
(beat)
Listen, Zenovich made a mistake. You
didn't let anybody down. It happens


CARTER
(grimly)
It won't happen again.

RACHEL
Where are you taking us?

BOOK
We're looking for a suspect. We've
reason to believe he's still in the
area.

RACHEL
You have no right to keep us here.

BOOK
Yes I do. Your son is a material
witness to a homicide.

RACHEL
You don't understand, we have nothing
to do with your laws!

BOOK
Doesn't surprise me. I meet a lot of
people like that.

RACHEL
It's not a joke.

Book decides to try contrition:

BOOK
You're right. It's not a joke. Listen,
I know a little about the Amish. I
know this has to be an ordeal for
you; and I'm really sorry you an
Samuel got involved.

Samuel shoots a look at Book then mutters something to his
mother in German. She responds in the same language. Book
frowns.

BOOK
What was that?

RACHEL
He wants to know who you are. Your
name. I told him we don't need to
know anything about you.

Book eyes Samuel:

BOOK
Book. John Book

EXT. 13TH ST. STATION NIGHT

Book's car stops, and from out of the shadows darts a wizened
little MAN. He looks about before crossing to the driver's
side window.

INT. BOOK'S CAR NIGHT

Book lowers the window.

BOOK
Sammy, where's Coalmine?

The little man stares at the weird-looking couple in the
back seat.

SAMMY
What you got there, the Salvation
Army?

BOOK
Coalmine.

SAMMY
Try "Happy Valley".

EXT. HAPPY VALLEY BAR, SOUTH STREET NIGHT

Book's car pulls up outside the bar and he and Carter get
out, and move swiftly inside.

INT. HAPPY VALLEY NIGHT

Sixty black faces stare as the police enter. A hush falls on
the group. Book and Carter spot their man at the bar and
move up either side of him. They've moved carefully to this
point... no mistakes. From the back, the black man they've
approached certainly looks like he could be the man who did
the killing of Zenovitch. And, as Book and Carter make their
move...

EXT. HAPPY VALLEY NIGHT

As Book and Carter explode through the door of the bar,
violently propelling Coalmine along with them. Now we see
Coalmine is not the killer.

As Book and Carter escort Coalmine out of the bar a police
squad car pulls up, its headlights shining into Book's car.
An alarmed Rachel holds Samuel close as Book forces Coalmine's
face down next to the car window.

BOOK
Put some light on him.

A cop pulls out a flashlight, begins to play the beam over
Coalmine's face.

BOOK
(continuing; to Samuel)
Look at him.

Crazy as Rasputin on speed and booze, Coalmine glares at
Samuel inside the car:

Samuel, white-faced, finally shakes his head in the negative.

Coalmine tries to twist free of Book's grip. Book snaps, and
slams Coalmine's skull into the window edge, finally crushing
his face up against the front window. His face takes on a
grotesque shape against the glass. Carter restrains his
partner and Book cools down. Coalmine is led stumbling away
by the uniformed police. This sudden show of violence has
horrified and angered Rachel, and she glares at Book as he
gets back in the car.

RACHEL
John Book, you listen to me! I will
have no further part in this, nor
will my son! As God stands between
us!

Book sighs, starts the engine and moves off.

EXT. HOTEL PHILADELPHIA NIGHT

Book pulls up outside a hotel entrance as a uniformed DOORMAN
moves to open the rear door.

INT. CAR NIGHT

Rachel and Sam recoil as the Doorman opens the door. He is
puzzled by the sight of the reluctant guests.

DOORMAN
Ma'am?

RACHEL
No! We do not stay in hotels.

Book and Carter exchange a glance.

EXT. / INT. FRONT DOOR, SUBURBAN HOUSE PHILADELPHIA
NIGHT

An attractive woman in her early thirties in robe and slippers
stares in disbelief as Rachel and Sam file into the house.
This is ELAINE, Book's sister. She stops Book as he tries to
follow Rachel inside.

ELAINE
How could you do this to me tonight?
I told you I had company

BOOK
Sorry. It's important.

BACK TO RACHEL

As she glances in a doorway.

HER POV ELAINE'S KITCHEN

It's a shambles, with dirty supper dishes piled sink, the
table littered with empty beer cans.

BACK TO RACHEL

As she hustles Samuel along.

BOOK / ELAINE

Book frowns:

BOOK
Where's Timmy and Buck?

ELAINE
Upstairs, asleep. Where'd you think?

BOOK
You've got a man here and the kids
are upstairs?

ELAINE
That's none of your goddamn business!
So keep your goddamn holier-than-
thou mouth shut!
(and)
Anyway, they like Fred.

BOOK
Oh sure, Fred.

Elaine looks like she's going to blow again, then decides
it's pointless.

ELAINE
Who are these orphans, anyway?

BOOK
They're Amish.

ANGLE IN GUEST ROOM

Samuel is asleep in one twin bed in a tiny, cluttered room.

Rachel, in a plain nightgown, is preparing to climb into the
other one.

Off screen we hear a DOOR CLOSE, presumably Book leaving. A
beat, then Elaine opens the door and looks in.

ELAINE
Everything okay?

RACHEL
Yes, thank you very much.

ELAINE
(a beat)
John said you're Amish.

RACHEL
Yes.

ELAINE
(blankly)
Oh.

She nods and goes.

Rachel crosses to Samuel, sits on the bed. Samuel looks up
at her bleakly.

SAMUEL
I don't want to stay here.

RACHEL
They are English. They don't
understand.

SAMUEL
I wish dawdie was with us.

RACHEL
(swallows)
I know. Sleep now, Liebchen.

She puts her hand on his forehead, closes his eyes. she
frowns, and...

EXT. DRIVE-IN FAST-FOOD JOINT PHILADELPHIA DAWN

Carter exits the cafe carrying burgers, donuts and a couple
of beers. Book wakes from a brief nap as Carter gets into
the car.

Book chews into his burger while Carter takes a doughnut.
Its clear they've worked through the night.

EXT. ELAINE'S HOUSE DAY

Elaine's house is situated on the corner of a row of terraces,
which stretch into the distance on both sides of the street.

INT. ELAINE'S HOUSE

As Samuel comes out of the guest room in his night-shirt,
turns up the hall and opens the door to the bathroom.

ANGLE

But it's not the bathroom; it's Elaine's bedroom. She and
FRED are tangled in the sheets, furiously making love. Elaine
gasps, Fred manages to grunt.

FRED
Wrong door, kid.

ANOTHER ANGLE

As Samuel quickly shuts the door. A straight-faced beat;
then, barely suppressing a giggle, he hurries on...

ANGLE IN LIVING ROOM

As Rachel appears in the living room entry. Samuel is sitting
on the floor with two boys of about his own age, watching
television.

They're eating cold cereal out of a box.

RACHEL'S POV TV SCREEN

Some artless Saturday morning cartoon.

BACK TO RACHEL

As she frowns, watching her son and the other two staring
hypnotically. And...

ANGLE IN LIVING ROOM

It's later in the morning now, as Elaine, a bit blearily,
appears in the entryway, stares in groggy disbelief.

HER POV KIDS

Her oldest boy and Samuel are busily washing the windows
while her youngest is pushing a carpet sweeper. The TV is
off.

BACK TO ELAINE

As she stares.

ANGLE IN KITCHEN

Rachel is standing in the middle of the now immaculate kitchen
finishing a brisk mop of the floor. The coffee is perking.
Elaine appears.

ELAINE
(mutters)
Jesus...

Rachel turns cheerily.

RACHEL
Good morning.

ELAINE
(helplessly)
You didn't have to...

RACHEL
I wanted to. you were kind to take
us in last night.
(and)
Anyway, I needed something to do. I
was so angry with your brother. He's
so... agaanisish!

ELAINE
Aganishish? Yeah, that sounds like
John.

She takes a seat at the table, still shaking her head.

RACHEL
Just a minute. I'll pour you some
coffee.

ELAINE
You're not carrying a bullwhip...
how'd you manage to put my kids to
work?

RACHEL
(smiles)
I made it a contest... the one who
does best gets his cereal back first.
(and)
Children like to help... they only
need to be kept after a little bit.

Rachel means no harm by this, but Elaine's eyes begin to
storm.

ELAINE
Oh, is that so?
(and)
No offense, lady, but I'm not so
sure I like the idea of your coming
in here and turning the place upside
down!

Rachel's smile fades at Elaine's trembling outburst:

RACHEL
Please, I didn't mean...

Abruptly Elaine rises and snatches the mop from Rachel's
hands.

She mops furiously as she Continues:

ELAINE
I know exactly what you meant! Listen,
maybe I'm not a world-class housefrau,
but maybe I don't have time to polish
the goddamn china and keep after the
kids!
(and)
It's none of your business, but I
don't happen to have a man around
here full time. So I sell cosmetics
in a goddamn drugstore and sometimes
I can even pay the rent on time! So
maybe I'm not Mary Poppins, but maybe
I don't need to have it jammed down
my throat like this.

She finishes the floor, hurls the mop aside with a CLATTER:

ELAINE
There is that clean enough for you?

Rachel is speechless, Elaine is on the point of bursting
into tears. At which point Fred appears at the entry in his
undershirt, taking in the sparkling kitchen.

FRED
Jesus, Elaine... Somebody die and
leave you a broom?

Not a politic observation on Fred's part.

ELAINE
(blurts)
Go to hell, Fred!

And, bursting into tears, she flees the kitchen. Fred stares
after her.

FRED
What's bugging her?

Unperturbed, he crosses to the counter and the coffee pot,
letting his eyes take in Rachel's full figure.

INT. ELAINE'S BEDROOM

As Rachel comes in with Elaine's coffee, closes the door
behind her. Elaine is lying across the bed, sobbing.

RACHEL
I brought your coffee.

She takes a seat next to the bed.

RACHEL
I'm sorry. I didn't mean it that
way.

After a moment, Elaine starts to pull herself together:

ELAINE
It's okay.
(and)
Look, I shouldn't have blown my top.
It's like... somehow... I've let
everything get away from me. And you
sort of made me face it.

She takes the cup, sips the coffee. Rachel smiles at a private
thought.

ELAINE
What's so funny?

RACHEL
Fred. The way he looked when you
screamed at him.

ELAINE
(disparing)
God, Fred...

RACHEL
At home you'd never hear a woman
scream at a man that way.

ELAINE
No? Why not?

RACHEL
You just wouldn't. It's not the Amish
way.
(then)
But I think it would have done me
good if I could have screamed at
your brother last night.

ELAINE
Listen, I don't know what's going on
or how you got mixed up with him,
but don't you let that self-righteous
son of a bitch push you around, okay?

Rachel smiles.

RACHEL
Okay.

INT. BOOK'S CAR (MOVING) DAY

Book glances irritably at Rachel:

BOOK
Now what's the problem?

RACHEL
The problem is I don't happen to
think my son should be spending all
his time with a man who carried a
gun under his coat and goes around
whacking people.

Book gives her a look:

BOOK
Whacking?

RACHEL
(firmly)
Yes. And I also want to leave this
city.

BOOK
Believe me, I'm trying to get this
over with as fast as I can. But Samuel
will probably have to come back and
testify.

RACHEL
We do not go into your courts.

BOOK
People who don't go into our courts
when they're told to sometimes go
directly into our jail.

Rachel glares at him and the ride continues on that chilly
note for a beat.

BOOK
Look, I'm genuinely sorry...

RACHEL
(snaps)
No you're not
(off his look)
You're glad, because now you've got
a witness.
(and)
I heard the other police talking
last night.
(and)
They don't seem to like you very
much.

BOOK
They kid a lot.

RACHEL
(glances at him)
I would not be too sure.

Samuel has been glancing at Book; finally he says something
to his mother in German. Book gives her an inquiring look.

RACHEL
He says you look very tired. I thought
the same thing.

Book says nothing.

RACHEL
But not a good tired.

BOOK
What's a 'good' tired. Tired is tired.

She doesn't bother to explain; Book settles even deeper into
his funk as Samuel glares at him with hostility.

INT. IDENTIFICATION ROOM POLICE H.Q. DAY

Samuel sits with Book at a desk, Rachel just behind. They
are looking at a police line-up of known black drug-dealers.
Samuel shakes his head another negative.

Book winks, slyly reaches into a pocket, produces a yellow
gumball. He surreptitiously shows it to Samuel, gives him an
inquiring look. It's a peace offering.

Samuel grins, nods imperceptibly.

ANOTHER ANGLE

As Book rolls the gumball down the table to Samuel. But just
as Samuel is about to cover it with his hand, Rachel reaches
over and plucks it off the table. She shakes her head at
Samuel.

BOOK
(to Rachel)
Just wanted to see if you were on
your toes.

EXT. CITY PARK DAY

Book, Sam and Rachel sit on a park bench eating a lunch of
hot dogs heaped with kraut.

Book watches with amusement as Samuel wolfs down his lunch.
Rachel eyes him a beat. then:

RACHEL
Your sister said you don't have a
family?

BOOK
No.

RACHEL
She thinks you should get married
and have children of your own. Instead
of trying to be a father to hers.
Except she thinks you're afraid of
the responsibility.

Book gives her a look:

BOOK
Oh? Anything else?

RACHEL
Oh yes. She thinks you like policing
because you think you're right about
everything. And you're the only one
who can do anything. And that when
you drink a lot of beer you say things
like none of the other police would
know a crook from a... um... bag of
elbows.

Book is staring at her. Rachel nods.

RACHEL
I think that's what she said.

Just then Samuel belches with huge satisfaction, drawing
looks from Book and a couple of passersby. Rachel smiles
proudly.

RACHEL
Good appetite.

CUT TO:

INT. OUTER OFFICE/WAITING ROOM, NARCOTICS DIVISION DAY

Rachel sits uneasily in the outer office, one or two police
clerks eyeing her curiously. A sign on the desk reads
"Narcotics Division."

Rachel cranes forward trying to peer through a partially
open door.

INT. DETECTIVES ROOM, NARCOTICS DIVISION, POLICE H.Q. DAY

A group of Narcotics Detectives are interrupted in mid
conversation by the opening of the main office door. They
stare in considerable surprise.

CUT TO:

JOHN BOOK

Standing in the doorway, holding little Samuel by the hand.

BOOK
Afternoon, gentlemen. I'd like you
to meet Samuel Lapp. We'd like a
little help.

INT. SMALL OFFICE, NARCOTICS DIVISION DAY

A Narcotics Detective enters the room laden with several
volumes of mug shots. He puts them on the desk beside a
similar book which Samuel is intently studying. Sam sits on
the chair cushions in a big swivel rocker.

The Detective, SGT. KAMAN, eyes Book a little suspiciously
internal affairs officers are not greeted warmly by the
working policemen in any department.

KAMAN
There's a Sgt. Carter on the phone
for you.

Book gets up and moves to the door.

KAMAN
And, Captain, don't want to rush
you, but I'm gonna need these files
back in a half hour. We got a lot of
work to do round here.

The two men leave. Samuel looks about before hopping off his
perch and following the direction taken by Book.

INT. DETECTIVES ROOM, NARCOTICS DIVISION DAY

Through glass partitions we can see Book on the telephone in
a cubicle of an office.

Samuel has drifted out of the office and is idling amid the
bustle of the squadroom.

He crosses to a glass case which holds a collection of plaques
and framed newspaper accounts which denote instances of
outstanding duty and achievement.

ANGLE THOUGH GLASS CASE

As Samuel moves along, only half interested in what his eyes
are taking in, not really old enough to comprehend anyway.

Until suddenly he freezes.

SAMUEL'S POV NEWSPAPER ACCOUNT

Enlarged, prominently displayed. The headline reads: "Division
Chief McElroy Honored For Youth Project". Accompanying the
item is a large sidebar mug-shot of McElroy clearly the
black man who murdered the young cop in the train station
men's room.

BACK TO SAMUEL

He stares, transfixed.

A long beat, then Book, lowering himself to one knee next to
Samuel, ENTERS FRAME.

He's watching Samuel, knowing from the boy's expression that
they've found their man. Samuel slowly raises his hand to
point at the photograph. Book gently takes the boy's small
hand in his, concealing the accusation from watchful eyes.
He smiles gently at the boy.

INT. BOOK'S CAR (MOVING) PHILADELPHIA DUSK

Rachel is curled tight in her corner of the front seat holding
Samuel close. Book glances at her:

RACHEL
Why don't you arrest that man? Are
you protecting him because policeman?

BOOK
(snaps)
Listen, I'm the cop that polices the
police. I'm not in the business of
protecting crooked cops.
(eases up)
I'll make an arrest when I know
everybody involved.

Rachel shakes her head.

RACHEL
But why would they murder...

BOOK
Because somehow they knew I was
getting close.
(and)
Look, it's narcotics... They make
dope out of chemicals... they sell
it on the street for millions of
dollars. They'll do anything.
(and)
And they can get away with it because
they're cops.

RACHEL
(beat, then)
I'm afraid. I'm afraid for Samuel. I
want to go home.

BOOK
You'll be safe. You don't have to
worry.

She says nothing.

Another beat, then:

BOOK
Look, they're thinking as long as
they keep the killer out of Samuel's
way, we can't make an I.D. There's
no way they can know Samuel saw that
photograph, so he's safe.

He glances at her, but she continues ahead.

BOOK
I mean it. You will be safe.

Suddenly Rachel explodes:

RACHEL
Oh yes! Of Course. Why shouldn't we
feel safe in a city where the police
are so busy killing each other!

CUT TO:

EXT. / INT. SCHAEFFER HOME, PHILADELPHIA SUBURBS NIGHT

The front door of Schaeffer's upper-middle class home is
opened by his wife MARILYN. She knows Book and is surprised
and delighted to see him. In the background daughter KATHY
is visible. Schaeffer himself appears and Book is welcomed
inside.

INT. SCHAEFFER'S STUDY NIGHT

Schaeffer passes Book a drink.

Book is excited, animated... the hunter, after a long chase,
closing on his quarry:

BOOK
It was McElroy, Paul.

Schaeffer gives him a sharp look:

BOOK
Last guy I would have figured. But
he's part of it.

SCHAEFFER
I hope you don't have any doubts
about that.

BOOK
If I did, I'd have kept my mouth
shut...
(and)
It fits, Paul... Fifty-five gallons
of P2P confiscated four years ago...
Guess who was in on the collar? Mac.
(excited, explaining
the thing eagerly)
He salts it away somewhere... he
knows the stuff is potent, but the
street chemists haven't figured out
how to process it. But they do now.
(and)
And now the stuff is worth five-grand
a pint and there are a lot of pints
in a fifty-five gallon drum.

SCHAEFFER
(beat)
Who else knows?

BOOK
Just us.

SCHAEFFER
(shakes his head)
Okay, what are you going to need to
clean it up

BOOK
More people... Gotta pick up where
Zenovich left off. People from outside
the department.

SCHAEFFER
(nods)
Maybe the Bureau. Or those bastards
at Treasury. I'll take care of it.
(then)
I hate this shit, Johnny. You cut
their balls off for me. I'm counting
on you.

Schaeffer pours himself another drink.

SCHAEFFER
What's your first move?

BOOK
(expels a breath)
A hot shower... I haven't changed
clothes in two days.

EXT. PARKING LOT PHILADELPHIA NIGHT

Book slams the front door of his car, checks it for being
locked, glances at a roiled newspaper in his hand (the sports
section of the Inquirer), starts across the parking lot toward
his apartment, walking as he keeps glancing down at the sports
section. He comes to a sort of crosswalk, stops, reads, starts
to take a step... and looks up.

WHAT HE SEES

McElroy, smiling nicely, starting across toward him from the
other side of the parking lot crosswalk

BACK TO BOOK

Freezing, eyes widening. Utterly surprised and caught.

MCELROY

Still smiling, he brings up his right hand out of a shopping
bag (which he appeared to be carrying) letting the shopping
bag fall away as he does so revealing a five-inch barrel
Smith and Wesson .357 blue finish revolver with a silencer.
Without hesitating, coming right on, still smiling, he FIRES
once.

BOOK

Already starting to leap away to one side, he is hit, driven
into a half-turn. He clutches at the wound, as:

MCELROY

Coming right on, FIRING again... the pistol's report a
WHOOSHING, like the opening of a bottle of cheap champagne.
And McElroy still smiling as:

BOOK

Hit... a grazing near-miss this time, but enough to send
Book down hard and grasping.

MCELROY

Lowering the pistol alongside his leg, as two MEN, barely
taking notice of anything, cross with their backs to Book
toward McElroy.

He smiles at them.

BOOK

Down, muttering CURSES.

THE SCENE

As McElroy walks past Book, drops the pistol to the pavement,
keeps on going... and is gone.

BOOK

GROANING in pain, beginning to try to crawl crab-like. And
we HEAR from the agonized recesses of Book's Dream.

SCHAEFFER (V.O.)
Who else knows?

BOOK (V.O.)
Just us.

As the lights of an oncoming car going very slowly, on its
way to a parking space sweep over him and we HEAR it come
to a sudden, squealing stop. Book is already trying to get
to his feet... now succeeds, lurching into a swaying stance,
using an adjacent car for support. OFF SCREEN we HEAR a car
door slam, and footsteps hurrying in our direction,
accompanied by excited voices. Book HEARS, turns to face the
oncomers,

ANGLE

A fat, middle-aged MAN has approached to within some feet of
Book, looks on edgily:

MAN
Hey, buddy, what's the score? Little
too much to drink?

Book stares at him, then looks down at his belly.

BOOK'S WOUND

As Book removes his hand we can see one of the bullets struck
him low in the side, just below the ribcage... the other
just above it (but this one inflicting only minor damage).

THE SCENE

As the man stares:

MAN
Goddamn, buddy. You better get to a
hospital!
(and)
Here; I'll give you a hand.

He starts to approach, but Book shoves him away.

BOOK
No! No hospital!

By now the man's WIFE is hovering at a safe distance:

WIFE
Let him alone, Henry! If he wants to
die in the street, that's his
business!

But the man is not content:

MAN
Shut up, Romona! Will ya look at
that blood?

Book has tried to lurch toward his car; the man tries to
intercept him:

MAN
Come on, buddy... you're gonna bleed
to death!

Book whirls on him, his service revolver in his hand pointed
squarely at the fat man's face:

MAN
Shit!

WIFE
(quavering)
I told you, Henry!

Book doesn't trust himself to speak, but the .38 is
sufficiently eloquent for the circumstances, He stares at
the fat man another beat, then hesitates, turns, starts back
toward his car.

EXT. STREET PHILADELPHIA NIGHT

As Book's car wheels somewhat erratically through traffic.

INT. BOOK'S CAR (MOVING)

Book has a gym bag open on the seat next to him, is stuffing
a tshirt under his belt to staunch the blood. And...

INT. CARTER'S APARTMENT BEDROOM NIGHT

As he's awakened by the RINGING bedside telephone. He snaps
on a lamp... He's instantly awake, not unused to such rousing
in the wee hours. A woman sleeps beside him.

CARTER
Yeah...

INTERCUT BOOK

He's at an n.d. pay phone.

BOOK
Listen carefully, I wrote the Amish
woman's name and address on my desk
calendar, I want you to lose it for
me, Now. Tonight.

CARTER
What the hell are you talking about?
What's happening.

BOOK
Nothing. I'm not going to be around
for a while. I'll call you when I
can.

CARTER
(alarmed)
Johnny, what the fuck?

BOOK
(hard)
Listen to me Schaeffer's part of
it. Maybe at the top of it.

There's a stunned silence at the other end.

BOOK
Yeah... I can put it all together
when I get back, 'Til then, you know
nothing, understand? Business as
usual...

CARTER
(beat)
I hear you.

BOOK
(nods)
Good. Take care of that woman's name
for me. And watch your ass.

INT. GUEST ROOM, ELAINE'S HOUSE NIGHT

As the door opens and Elaine switches on the light, rousing
Rachel. Elaine looks haggard.

ELAINE
It's John. He says you have to leave
now. He says it's urgent.

She leaves the room as Rachel instantly awake, moves quickly
to rouse Samuel.

EXT. BATHROOM DOOR

Elaine is outside the bathroom listening to instructions
from her brother. From inside we hear the SOUND OF RUNNING
WATER. Elaine is puzzled but also senses the urgency.

BOOK (V.O.)
Put my car in the garage and close
the door.

ELAINE
John, I don't understand any of this.

BOOK (V.O.)
(snaps)
You don't know anything... borrowed
your car. Didn't say why. And you
never heard of that woman and her
boy.

ELAINE
John, why?...

BOOK
(shouts)
Just do it!

INT. BATHROOM

Book looks at himself in the mirror, his face is pale and
drawn.

He examines the wound, a cleanly drilled hole through his
right side, just under the rib cage. The wound continues to
bleed as he binds a towel tightly about him, before putting
his shirt back on.

He then carefully wipes away any traces of blood on basin
with tissues which he flushes down the toilet.

INT. BOOK'S CAR (MOVING)

As he drives across town. Samuel is curled up asleep, his
head on Rachel's lap.

RACHEL
Where are you taking us now?

BOOK
Home.

RACHEL
You couldn't wait until morning?

Book gives her a look.

RACHEL
(insistent)
What happened?

But Book, glancing in his rearview mirror, tenses.

HIS POV MIRROR

In it we can see a police car coming on fast, with lights
and SIREN.

BACK TO SCENE

Rachel eyes Book warily.

A beat, then the police car WAILS past. Book expels a breath.

RACHEL
You said we would be safe in
Philadelphia.

BOOK
I was wrong.

Rachel looks away, speaks almost sarcastically, MUTTERING.

RACHEL
Kinner un Narre...
["Kinner un Narre saage die Waahret"
"Children and fools say the truth"
Amish expressions]

INT. PHILADELPHIA POLICE HEADQUARTERS BOOK'S OFFICE
NIGHT

ANGLE PAST Book's desk calendar. Carter enters in the b.g.,
crosses quickly to the desk. He snaps on a light, thumbs a
page of the calendar. Frowns.

INSERT

Rachel's name and address scribbled on a page of the calendar.

BACK TO SCENE

ANGLE

A couple of plainclothesmen have paused outside the door to
give him a look. Meets their eyes. They move on.

Carter shakes it off, goes. And...

CUT TO:

INT. CAR (MOVING)

As light colors the eastern horizon, Book is crossing into
Lancaster County.

Book glances at Rachel; she's asleep. He coughs wrackingly,
hurting... cinches the belt of his overcoat even tighter.
And...

EXT. LAPP FARM

HIS POV BOOK'S CAR

Coming up the long drive.

BACK TO SCENE

As the car pulls up in the barnyard and Eli crosses to it.

Suddenly the car door flies open and Samuel jumps out, races
across the barnyard to hurl himself into the old man.

ANGLE AT CAR

As Rachel steps out of the passenger's side, Book remains
seated.

He lets his eyes travel around the farm.

RACHEL
Stay for awhile. Rest. I'll make
coffee and breakfast.

BOOK
I can't.

RACHEL
What about Samuel? Will you come
back to take him to trial?

Book starts the engine:

BOOK
(grimly)
There isn't going to be one.

Rachel stares at him, not sure what he means. Then backs
away, closing the door. Book begins to turn the car around
in the barnyard.

ANGLE

As Eli crosses to Rachel, his arm around Samuel.

ELI
Who was that man?

RACHEL
His name is John Book.

Eli is about to inquire further when Samuel cries:

SAMUEL
Momma look.

They glance in the direction Samuel is looking.

THEIR POV BOOK'S CAR

The car has failed to take a bend in the road and is now
bouncing across an adjoining ploughed field. It's knocked
over a tall birdhouse by the roadside. The car finally comes
to rest against a bank of earth.

BACK TO RACHEL

She stares...

CUT TO:

EXT. FIELD DAY

As Samuel races for all he's worth across the field,
negotiates the creek via a fallen log Rachel, now, also
running toward the car.

EXT. STABLES DAY

Eli works fast harnessing his mules to an open wagon. He
hops up to the front seat and urges them to trot.

ANGLE AT BOOK'S CAR

We see that Rachel has made Book as comfortable as possible
in the front seat of the car and is packing the wound under
his trenchcoat with material ripped from her apron.
Momentarily he comes awake:

RACHEL
But John... why didn't you go to a
hospital?

BOOK
No, no doctor...

RACHEL
(bewildered)
But why?

BOOK
Gunshot... they'll file reports...
they'll find me.

RACHEL
But

Book reaches up to grip her arm fiercely:

BOOK
And when they find me, they'll find
your boy!

He slips under again. Rachel stares at him, realizing the
price he's paid in returning them to safety.

She reaches out, touches him gently.

But the moment is broken by...

ANOTHER ANGLE

As Eli reins up in the springwagon. He climbs down, crosses
to glance into the car.

ELI
Is the English dead?

RACHEL
No...

ELI
Looks dead...

And together they begin to lift Book from the car and place
him in the back of the springwagon. And...

INT. LAMP FARMHOUSE

Where Eli is looking out a window.

HIS POV BUGGY

An Amish buggy coming up the drive, past Book' s car.

ANGLE IN BEDROOM

Where Book lies on a bed. Rachel is bathing his wound with
warm water from a pan.

Eli appears in the doorway.

ELI
Stoltzfus is coming.

Rachel looks at him, nods.

Eli frowns at Book's holstered pistol lying atop his neatly
folded clothes on a chair near the bed.

ELI
That has no place in this house.

RACHEL
I know.

She picks up the pile of clothes and the pistol and places
them in a chest.

RACHEL
It will go when he goes.

INT. LIVING ROOM

As Samuel comes in with old Stoltzfus and Stoltzfus's teenage
son, LEVI.

RACHEL
Thank you for coming, Stoltzfus.

Stoltzfus's eyes have gone to the bed:

STOLTZFUS
That's the English is it?

INT. SICKROOM TIGHT

As Stoltzfus runs his fingers lightly over the vicinity of
Book's wound:

STOLTZFUS (O.S.)
I feel... burning.

WIDER

As Stoltzfus, in his shirt sleeves and concentrating mightily,
moistens his fingertips with saliva, continues the
examination.

Finally he steps back.

STOLTZFUS
This man should be treated in town.
(indicates)
The bullet entered there... and came
out there. But there is the danger
of infection, and he has lost a great
deal of blood.

Rachel looks at Stoltzfus, then turns away, torn by her
dilemma.

Her eyes fall on Samuel. Gently she ushers him from the room:

RACHEL
Go help Levi with the car, Samuel.

She closes the door after him, then turns to face Eli and
Stoltzfus:

RACHEL
No, he must stay here.

Stoltzfus gives Eli a puzzled look. And:

ELI
Didn't you hear Stoltzfus? What if
he dies? Then the sheriff will come.
They'll say we broke their laws

RACHEL
We'll pray that he doesn't die! But
if he does, then we'll find a way so
no one knows!

ELI
Rachel, this is a man's life, we
hold it in our hands.

RACHEL
I know God help me, I know that,
Eli.
(then)
But I tell you that if he's found
here, the people who did this to him
will come for Samuel.

Rachel beseeches them helplessly:

RACHEL
What else can we do?

EXT. LAPP DRIVE

Levi has hitched Eli's mules to the rear of Book's car and
is towing it up the drive toward the barn, with Samuel
catching a ride on the bumper.

RACHEL

Where she's waiting with the big barn doors thrown open. As
the mules tow the car in, she closes the doors.

INT. LAPP FARMHOUSE LIVING ROOM

As Stoltzfus and Levi are about to go: Stoltzfus turns to
Rachel:

STOLTZFUS
Make a poultice... three parts milk,
two parts linseed oil... for the
infection.

I'll send Mary by with some teas I will brew myself.

RACHEL
Thank you.

Stoltzfus turns to Eli:

STOLTZFUS
Lapp, I'll have to speak with the
diener on this matter.

ELI
(nods)
As you see fit, Stoltzfus.

CUT TO:

INT. SICKROOM LAPS FARM NIGHT

As Rachel enters, turns up a kerosene lamp which is burning
low at bedside. She's carrying the poultice Stoltzfus ordered.

Book's brow is beaded with sweat.

Rachel seats herself next to the bed, strips away the sweat-
soaked sheet. Her eyes take in his bare torso, and we should
get the feeling that there's rather more male animal on
display here just now than she's quite comfortable with.

She begins to apply the poultice.

ANGLE

As Book rouses to semi-consciousness, in his delirium he
recoils with alarm.

RACHEL
It's all right! You have got to lie
still.

Book stares up at her without recognition, but some of what
she says seems to penetrate. He quiets.

RACHEL
(soothingly)
Yes, much better...

ANGLE

As Book lapses back into sleep. Rachel hasn't removed her
hand from his chest. Abruptly she does so.

She finds herself wondering about this man lying before her,
so suddenly a part of her life. She notices details; bruises,
scars, the knuckles are hard, grazed, a tattoo on one
shoulder. While lost in this reverie, the delirious
Philadelphia policeman begins to mutter. Incoherently at
first, then the words take shape swear words; curses; fuck
this and that; shit; etc. Rachel rises abruptly, her cheeks
coloring, as the barrage of language pours from his mouth.
She beats a hasty retreat closing the door swiftly behind
her.

INT. SCHAEFFER'S OFFICE DAY

He's on the phone:

SCHAEFFER
Looks like we're going to need some
help from you folks down there.

INT. LANCASTER COUNTY SHERIFF'S OFFICE DAY

Where an UNDERSHERIFF is on the phone:

UNDERSHERIFF
...want to help any way we can, Chief,
but you got to understand we've got
upwards of seven thousand Amish over
here.

And that's just Lancaster County.

INTERCUT SCHAEFFER

Who is trying to control his impatience:

SCHAEFFER
I've got the woman's name, Sheriff.
Lapp. Rachel Lapp. That should
simplify your work.

The Undersheriff frowns. He doesn't like being talked down
to.

UNDERSHERIFF
How about an address?

SCHAEFFER
Ah... no.

UNDERSHERIFF
(frowns)
Maybe a road or route number?

SCHAEFFER
Sorry.

The Undersheriff is not impressed.

UNDERSHERIFF
Problem is, Chief, 'bout every third
Amishman around here is named Lapp.
That or Yoder. Or Hochstetler.
(and)
Chief, if the Amish have taken your
man in, I wouldn't want to hang from
a rope until you find him.

ANGLE

Schaeffer is tight-lipped with contained fury:

SCHAEFFER
Thank you, Sheriff. It's been an
education.

He hangs up. A beat; the man is a study in frustration. Then
he glances up.

ANOTHER ANGLE

Standing in his doorway are the two plainclothesmen who
spotted Carter in Book's office in the earlier scene. And...

CUT TO:

EXT. LAPP FARM DAY

A bright, sunny afternoon.

SAMUEL

Where he's leading a team of horses to the barn. In the b.g.
three buggies are parked in the barnyard, traces empty.
Visitors.

ANGLE IN SICKROOM

Where Book lies in the bed. His fever seems to have subsided.
He's coming awake, tries to focus on the room.

BOOK'S POV CLERGY

PANNING the four men in Amish black who are standing around
the bed looking down at Book, muttering among themselves in
German.

These include TSCHANTZ, the district bishop, a hawk-nosed,
sterneyed old fellow; Stoltzfus, a deacon as well as a healer;
and two preachers, ERB and HERSHBERGER. Eli stands somewhat
apart.

ANGLE

Another moment of silence, then Book opens his eyes.

Tschantz rumbles in German.

SUBTITLES OVER.

TSCHANTZ
Well, Stoltzfus, another Lazarus to
your credit.

STOLTZFUS
He was touched by God's hand.

Tschantz grunts, motions, for the other clergy aside with
him.

Rachel enters briskly with a steaming pot of tea and a cup,
smiles.

RACHEL
Hello.

Book stares at her, then at the old bearded gentlemen.

BOOK
(closing his eyes)
Who are they?

RACHEL
The leadership of our district...
the diener. Bishop Tschantz is the
one with no hair on top. They decided
to come and see you for themselves.
Except Stoltzfus, of course. He came
the first day. I think he saved your
life.

BOOK
Can I have something to drink?

Rachel brings him tea.

BOOK
Does anybody know I'm here?

RACHEL
Only the elders.

BOOK
How long?

RACHEL
What?

BOOK
How long have I been here?

RACHEL
Two days.

BOOK
(a beat)
Listen, thank you. Thanks for
everything. But I've got to go.

RACHEL
(frowns)
But you can't.

He tries to rise, falls back faint. Rachel rearranges the
sheet.

RACHEL
See. Anyway, you don't have any
clothes on. And besides that, Bishop
Tschantz wants to talk to you when
you feel better.

The elders appear to have concluded their conference, and
are filing out. Stoltzfus pauses at bedside.

STOLTZFUS
Rest, Mr. Book. That's the ticket.
And drink my of my tea.

He goes. Book is still fending off the dizziness. Rachel
puts the teacup to his lips.

BOOK
Tell him his tea stinks.

RACHEL
(smiles)
You tell him. When you're able.

He looks like he's about to drop off again. Rachel rises.

RACHEL
(from the door)
We're all very happy that you're
going to live, John Book. We didn't
quite know what we were going to do
with you if you died.

That penetrates for a moment just before Book slips into
sleep again.

INT. LAPP LIVING ROOM DAY

As the rather worrisome Hershberger frowns:

HERSHBERGER
...but a gunshot wound. Very serious.

TSCHANTZ
It is not the first time we have
done this. In the Englischer war of
the revolution, old Elmer Miller's
grandfather took in gunshot English
soldiers.
(a tad of pride)
Saved them, too.

They all nod. What Tschantz says is well known. Then:

ERB
Still, he should be among his own
people.

Rachel enters on this last.

RACHEL
He'll leave as soon as he is able.
He already wants to go.

Hershberger gives her a gloomy look, turns to Stoltzfus:

HERSHBERGER
How long will that be, Stoltzfus?

STOLTZFUS
(shrugs)
A month. Maybe less. With God's
healing love.

EXT. BOOK'S SISTER'S HOUSE PHILADELPHIA DAY

Schaeffer is knocking at the front doors. A beat, then Elaine
opens it cautiously, peers out.

ELAINE
(half fearfully)
Did you find him?

SCHAEFFER
Not yet.

Suddenly her eyes blaze, she starts to close the door:

ELAINE
Then go away, you bastard.

Schaeffer quickly but gently prevents her from shutting
it.

SCHAEFFER
Elaine, I've come to apologize for
Lt. McElroy. He overstated the
department's position.

ELAINE
(bitterly)
He accused John of taking kickbacks.
And you know anybody who knows
John knows that's a goddamn lie!

SCHAEFFER
(smoothly)
Of course, Elaine. But as long as
there's any question, better Johnny
should come back and clear his name.

ELAINE
(cuts in)
Better you should get off my front
porch before I get my mace!

SCHAEFFER
Elaine, I don't want to have to take
you in for questioning. You've got
his car, you were the last to see
him

ELAINE
(clipped)
I don't know where he is.

SCHAEFFER
But... if you had to guess?

ANOTHER ANGLE SCHAEFFER'S CAR

McElroy watching.

THEIR POV FRONT DOOR

We see a final exchange between Elaine and Schaeffer. Elaine
forces the door shut. Schaeffer turns, walks slowly to his
car.

INT. SCHAEFFER'S CAR

As Schaeffer opens the door, climbs in, sinks wearily into
the seat, beside McElroy.

MCELROY
She say where he is?

SCHAEFFER
I don't think she knows.

Schaeffer is staring grimly ahead.

SCHAEFFER
What about Carter?

MCELROY
Tight. But I'm working on him.

SCHAEFFER
Lean on him.

EXT. LAPP FARM LANCASTER COUNTY NIGHT

REESTABLISHING, and TIGHTENING to the upstairs sickroom window
where a lamp dimly burns.

INT. SICKROOM

As Samuel comes in with a fresh bedpan. Book is lying asleep
on the bed.

Samuel puts the bedpan down, checks to make sure Book is
indeed asleep, then quietly crosses to the foot of the bed
and opens the clothes chest.

ANGLE

Book's big .38 revolver lies holstered atop his folded
clothes.

Fascinated, Samuel picks it up, admiring the heavy burled
pistol grips. Unable to resist, he starts to remove the weapon
from the holster, then pauses to steal a look. OFF SCREEN...

BOOK

His eyes are open and watching Samuel icily, which gives the
boy something of a jolt.

BOOK
Give me that.

Mutely, Samuel hands Book the pistol from arm's length. He
looks on as Book takes the pistol out of the holster, shoots
the boy another look, then snaps open the cylinder and shakes
out the heavy, copper-jacketed bullets into his palm. He
snaps the cylinder closed again, then nods to Samuel.

BOOK
Come here.

The boy edges closer.

BOOK
You ever handle a pistol like this,
Samuel?

SAMUEL
(swallows)
No pistol. Ever.

BOOK
Tell you what I'm going to let you
handle this one. But only if you
promise not to say anything to your
momma. I've got a feeling she wouldn't
understand.

SAMUEL
(grins)
Okay, Mr. Book.

Book smiles. Then he gives the boy a playful, John Wayne-
tough guy wink as he cocks and uncorks the pistol,
demonstrating the action.

He finally hands it over to Samuel, butt first.

BOOK
Call me John.

The boy tries to imitate Book's one-handed expertise, but
his hands are too small. Book smiles.

Samuel finally manages to get the thing cocked, using two
hands, and Book reaches over to guide the muzzle away so
that it's not pointed at him.

BOOK
You don't want to point that at people
you just started calling by their
first name.

Samuel levels the pistol at the door and, just as he snaps
the trigger, Rachel enters, pulls up short in some dismay to
find her son has a gun pointed at her. Samuel blanches and
Book winces, knowing there's heavy weather ahead.

RACHEL
(snaps)
Samuel!

Samuel quickly hands the pistol back to Book, who holsters
it:

RACHEL
Wait for me downstairs.

Samuel quickly exits, and Rachel angrily advances on Book.

RACHEL
John Book, I would appreciate it if,
during the time you are with us, you
would have as little to do with Samuel
as possible.

BOOK
Nobody meant any harm. The boy was
curious. I unloaded the gun -

RACHEL
It's not the gun. Don't you
understand... It's you. What you
stand for.
(and)
That is not for Samuel.

Book looks at her thoughtfully.

Rachel softens a bit:

RACHEL
Please, it has nothing to do with
you personally.

He hands her the holstered gun and the loose bullets.

BOOK
Put it up someplace Samuel can't get
it.

A beat, then Rachel, takes the pistol and starts to go. Book
stops her:

BOOK
Friends?

Rachel glances back at him, smiles and nods. And...

CUT TO:

INT. KITCHEN LAPP FARMHOUSE NIGHT

Book's holstered gun and bullets at center table. Eli sits
on one side, a chastened Samuel on the other. Rachel looks
on from the b.g.

Eli knows that this is as important a dialogue as he will
ever have with his grandson: at issue is one of the central
pillars of the Amish way.

ELI
The gun that gun of the hand is
for the taking of human life. Would
you kill another man? Eh?

Samuel stares at it, not meeting his grandfather's eyes. Eli
leans forward, extends his hands ceremonially.

ELI
What you take into your hands, you
take into your heart.

A beat, then Samuel musters some defiance.

SAMUEL
I would only kill a bad man.

ELI
Only a bad man. I see. And you know
these bad men on sight? You are able
to look into their hearts and see
this badness?

SAMUEL
I can see what they do.

Now he meets Eli's eyes:

SAMUEL
I have seen it.

Eli expels a deep sigh; then:

ELI
And having seen, you would become
one of them?
(intent... gesturing)
Don't you see...? The hand leads the
arm leads the shoulder leads the
head... leads the heart. The one
goes into the other into the other
into the other... And you have
changed, and gone amongst them...

He breaks off, bows his head for a moment. Then he fixes the
boy with a stern eye and, driving he heel of his palm firmly
into the tabletop with enormous intensity:

ELI
"Wherefore come out from among them
and be ye separate, saith the Lord!"

ELI
(indicating pistol;
continuing from
Corinthians 6:17)
"And touch not the unclean thing!"

His intensity tinged with righteous anger, he is hugely
impressive.

EXT. WASHHOUSE NEAR KITCHEN NIGHT

Book stands near the door to the kitchen, and has heard most
or all of Eli's words. He turns, and painfully makes his way
into the washhouse, moving quietly, hoping no one will come
out from the kitchen.

EXT. BARN LAPP FARM DAY

Samuel harnesses up the family mare, and backs her into the
traces of the buggy.

INT. BOOK'S BEDROOM DAY

Book stands at the window in a worn robe. Below, through the
window, we can see Samuel and Eli in the barnyard. A beat,
then Book crosses impatiently back to his bed, sits down,
picks up a dog-earred copy of The American Dairyman. There's
a stack of well-thumbed farm magazines and copies of The
Budget (the Amish newspaper) on the bedside table.

There's a knock. Rachel enters carrying a pile of clothing.
She smiles.

RACHEL
Enjoying your reading?

BOOK
Very interesting. I'm learning a lot
about manure.
(eyes the clothing)
What's that?

RACHEL
Your shirt and jacket are still
stained with blood. I have them
soaking.You can wear these.

She passes the clothes to Book.

BOOK
Your husband's?

RACHEL
Yes. It's good that someone can have
the use of them. Besides, in your
clothes you'd stand out to strangers.

She continues, cheerfully.

RACHEL
I should tell you these do not have
buttons.
(shows him)
See? Hooks and eyes.

BOOK
Something wrong with buttons?

RACHEL
Buttons are Hochmut.

BOOK
Hochmut?

RACHEL
Vain. Proud. Such a person is
Hochmutsnarr. He is not plain.

BOOK
(nodding)
Anything against zippers?

RACHEL
(almost blushing)
You make fun of me. Like the tourists.
Driving by all the time. Some even
come into the yard. Very rude. They
seem to think we are quaint.

BOOK
Quaint? Can't imagine why.

She smiles.

BOOK
Where's the nearest telephone?

RACHEL
Telephone? The Gunthers across the
valley. They're Mennonite. They have
cars and refrigerators and telephones
in the houses even.

BOOK
No. I'd want a public phone.

Rachel's face clouds.

RACHEL
Well... the store at Saltzburg...
(then briskly)
But you won't be going to Saltzburg
for a while.

BOOK
I'm going this morning.

RACHEL
But Stoltzfus said...

BOOK
(cutting in)
I know what he said.

RACHEL
You can go with Eli. He's taking
Samuel to school. But you'll have to
hurry.

Rachel turns to leave when Book calls her back.

BOOK
Rachel.

She turns to look at him. It's the first time he's used her
name.

BOOK
Thanks.

She smiles and leaves.

EXT. FARMHOUSE DAY

Eli calls impatiently from the buggy. Samuel sits beside
him.

ELI
Hurry up now, John Book!

INT. KITCHEN DAY

Rachel washing dishes turns on hearing Book enter. She laughs
out loud at the sight of him in his Amish gear, and rightly
so the pants are highwater, the hat low-rise, the jacket
ill-fitting.

Book looks self-conscious, even a little sheepish.

Outside another SHOUT from Eli.

RACHEL
You'd better go.

Book looks embarrassed.

BOOK
My... eh... gun?

The smile fades from Rachel's face as she reaches up into a
cupboard. She passes the gun in its holster to Book. He
fastens it about him. The contradiction of an "Armed Amishman"
increases the awkwardness between them. Book turns his back
to her and checks the weapon. He turns back to her smiling
in an odd way.

BOOK
The... bullets?

RACHEL
Oh. The bullets.

She takes them out of a disused coffee jar, passes them to
Book.

BOOK
(attempting a joke)
Not much good without them.

INT. BUGGY COUNTRY ROAD DAY

Samuel sits between Eli and Book. Both men stare straight
ahead.

Eli looks particularly stern. It's pretty clear he doesn't
like this Englishman wearing the clothes of his faith.

EXT. AMISH ONE-TEACHER-SCHOOL DAY

With awave Samuel runs into the schoolyard to join his
friends. A teacher begins ringing a bell.

INT. STORE SALTZBURG

Book on the telephone waiting for his call to be answered.
He looks about him several Amish and Dithers mingle in the
shop.

Book-has gotten a coke from a machine, seems a bit self-
conscious shout it sips at it surreptitiously... A voice
comes on the line; it's that of Book's partner.

CARTER
Yeah?

A silence.

BOOK
It's me.

CARTER
Johnny! Where the hell have you been?

BOOK
Never mind. I'm coming in to take
care of business. How hot am I?

CARTER
(low, urgent)
Too hot. Don't do it. Don't come in.

BOOK
I'm coming.

CARTER
Listen, Johnny, don't do anything
stupid. You couldn't get within a
mile of Schaeffer right now. So stay
put... Stay in touch I'll let you
know when maybe it makes sense.

A beat as Book considers that.

CARTER
(edgily)
You hear me?

BOOK
(finally)
I hear you. I'll stay in touch.

CARTER
That's more like it.
(and)
Where are you at, anyway?

Book allows himself a small smile, regarding his Amish image
reflected in the window of the store.

BOOK
Where I'm at is maybe 1890.

CARTER
(uncomprehending)
Say again?

BOOK
Make that 1790.

He hangs up. A beat, then he stares toward the door of the
store.

INT. BARN DAY

Book works on his car. The battery has gone flat and he's
trying to charge it up by running wires to a battery mounted
under the front seat of the Lapp buggy.

Eli stands at the barn door staring at him, again the
disapproving look.

ELI
If you are well enough to do that
thing, you can do work for me.

Book is genuinely apologetic.

BOOK
Sure, I'm sorry. Hope you don't mind
me plugging in to your battery. Mine's
dead... How can I help? What can I
do?

ELI
Maybe milking.

BOOK
(eyes Eli)
Milking?

ELI
Cows. You know, cows?

BOOK
I've seen pictures.

ELI
Good, you start tomorrow.

INT. BOOK'S ROOM LAPP FARM NIGHT

Where Book lies asleep. A beat, then Eli comes in carrying a
lamp.

He pauses a moment to peer at the sleeping figure with
undisguised anticipation. Then he gives him a jarring thump:

ELI
(briskly)
Veck oufl. Time for milking.

Book comes groggily awake as Eli exits. He gropes for his
watch.

INSERT WATCHFACE

It reads 4:30 a.m.

BACK TO BOOK

As he stares at it in disbelief.

INT. BARN

As the milk herd of half dozen or so cows ambles in with
Samuel prodding them along, headed for the milking stalls.
Book looks on in the lamplight, nonplused.

SAMUEL

Where he's pitching hay into the cow's feed-troughs.

BOOK, ELI

Where the old man is showing Book how to milk a cow by hand.
We see Rachel watching from the milkhouse door (steam from
scalding milk cans rising behind her).

ELI
Good, firm twist and pull, eh?
(and)
Right. Now you try it.

Book gives him a look, takes over the milking stool. The cow
shoots him a rather skeptical look over her shoulder. Book
bends to his task.

ELI
Didn't you hear me, Book? Pull! You
never had your hands on a teat before?

BOOK
(grimly)
Not one this big.

Eli unexpectedly finds this hilarious, cackles, gives Book a
comradely, man-of-the-world thump on the shoulder that jars
him.

Then he moves off. Book bends to his task, and...

ANGLE RACHEL

Grinning, giggling, covering her mouth with one hand.

As he pours a pail full of milk into a large, stainless steel
milk can.

EXT. BARN

As the milk herd is released back into the pasture. Book
crosses into the f.g., stares OFF SCREEN.

BOOK'S POV HORIZON

And dawnfire etching the hilltops. The BELLHOUSE behind the
house, the sun reflecting from the heavy bell beneath its
small roof.

BACK TO BOOK

Something in him can't help but respond to the beauty.

A beat, then he blows on his hands, rubs them briskly together
against the morning chill, and turns back to the barn.

EXT. LAPP FARMHOUSE DAY

It is later in the morning. Rachel comes out onto the porch,
tosses a pan of dirty dishwater off onto the grass, looks
toward the barn.

ANGLE THE BARN

Eli and Book standing in one of the open doorways, looking
in.

INT. THE BARN

ANGLE FAVORING Luke, one of Eli's team of fine mules as Samuel
opens the stall gate. The beast is skittish, obviously
afflicted with something of a behavioral problem.

But he allows Samuel to lead him out.

BOOK, ELI

As Samuel brings Luke out. Eli is now harnessing the other
mule of the team to a large manure-spreader. But as Luke
nears Book, his eyes widen and he shies, almost hauling Samuel
off his feet.

BOOK
(alarmed)
Careful, son

Book moves to Samuel's aid; a gesture which proves a serious
mistake. Luke erupts into a SCREAMING, bucking cyclone. Samuel
who no doubt has been here before dives nimbly for cover
as a flying hoof nearly takes Book's head off.

Then Eli hustles into the fray, pushing Book aside as he
BELLOWS belligerently in German at the rearing animal. Finally
he gives Luke a swat upside the head that seems, somehow, to
have the effect of quieting the beast instantly.

ANGLE

Samuel gives the shaken Book a look:

SAMUEL
That's Luke. He doesn't like
strangers.

BOOK
(still shaken)
You don't say.

Eli leads the pacified mule back to the traces, grunting at
Book.

ELI
Have to teach you mules, too, I guess.

CUT TO:

EXT. FIELD NEAR FARMHOUSE DAY

Book collects the pieces of the birdhouse which his car
knocked down the day of his attempted departure. He pauses
as a figure approaches. We recognize Daniel Hochstetler,
Rachel's would-be suitor. He heads for Book with an outgoing
smile and outstretched hand. Here's a likable man who likes
people.

HOCHSTETLER
Good morning. Book, is it? You are
the Yankee they talk about?

BOOK
I thought I was the English.

HOCHSTETLER
English, Yankee. It's the same. My
name is Daniel. Daniel Hochstetler.
(sizes up his clothes)
You look plain, Book.
(grinning)
Very plain.

Book is not particularly amused.

HOCHSTETLER
I came to see Rachel Lapp.

BOOK
Try the house.

Hochstetler gives Book a powerful clap on the shoulder.

HOCHSTETLER
(genially)
You bet. you take care of yourself.

Hochstetler heads for the house. Book stares after him with
some interest.

ANGLE

As Rachel emerges from the house to greet him. She also
catches sight of Book and she pauses, a shadow of confusion
crossing her expression for an instant.

And Hochstetler doesn't miss it either.

Then she gives her suitor a genuine smile of welcome.

HOG PENS

Book, having gathered up the pieces of the bird house, is
headed toward the outbuildings, passing by hog pens. He
glances toward the house:

HIS POV THE BACK PORCH

Where Rachel and Hochstetler are sitting in a porch swing,
sharing a pitcher of lemonade.

BACK TO BOOK

Thoughtful... He glances at the hog pen as a huge sow SQUEALS
and angrily noses her young ones away from the trough so she
can feed.

BOOK
Pigs.

INT. CARPENTRY SHOP, LAPP FARM DAY

Book works on repairing the broken birdhouse when Rachel
enters.

BOOK

He uses a drawknife on a piece of 2x4, with some obvious
expertise.

RACHEL
Eli is a fine carpenter. Best in the
district. He and his father built
the big house themselves forty years
ago.

BOOK
Oh?
(and)
What happened to Hochstetler?

RACHEL
We had some lemonade and he left.

BOOK
A real fireball.

Rachel smiles. Book crosses to a workbench and selects another
tool.

RACHEL
You know carpentry?

BOOK
I did some carpentry summers when I
was going to school.

RACHEL
What else can you do?

BOOK
(really annoyed)
I can whack people. I'm hell at
whacking.

RACHEL
Whacking is not of much use on a
farm.

BOOK
Now hold on. There's a lot of people
who think being a cop is a legitimate
job.

RACHEL
I'm sorry. I'm sure it is.

She turns, starts to go. Then turns back, eyeing his makeshift
garb:

RACHEL
Tonight I'll let out those trousers
for you.

Stifling a smile, she goes. HOLD on Book a beat, then...

CUT TO:

INT. LAPP FARMHOUSE DINING ROOM

Eli is seated at the head of the table, Book opposite Samuel
and Rachel. The table is piled high with an incredible amount
of food.

Eli eyes Book cagily, waves his fork at him:

ELI
Eat up, Book. What's the matter with
your appetite?

BOOK
Guess I'm not used to so much.

ELI
(snorts)
Not used to hard work. That's what
makes an appetite.

Book swallows that one. With difficulty. Rachel intervenes:

RACHEL
Eli, John is a carpenter.
(conciliatory
afterthought)
As well as being a fine policeman.

ELI
Eh? Well then, maybe he can go to
Zook's barn-raising, eh? See how
good a carpenter.

Book can't refuse the challenge.

BOOK
Sure.

RACHEL
But... You may not be well enough.

BOOK
I'll drink some more of Stoltzfus'
tea.

EXT. / INT. BARN NIGHT

As Rachel, lamp in hand, walks up to the barn. She looks in
to find Book tinkering with the battery hookup to the Lapp
buggy.

He glances up as she enters:

BOOK
Hi...

As she sets her lamp down near the one he's using.

RACHEL
(beat)
When will you be going?

BOOK
Not long... A few days.

Another beat as Rachel watches him... Book, checking out the
battery power, hits the radio and suddenly from the
Twentieth Century comes the sound of one of its major
inventions rock and roll.

It fills the barn, but Book turns up the volume a click more
even and, eyeing Rachel, starts moving with the beat. It's
his culture, coming through loud and clear, as incongruous
as it all might seem with the tough Philly cop decked out in
Amish.

Rachel can't help but laugh... Sensing her response, Book
sweeps her up and they boogie in the lamplight, Rachel
alternately protesting and laughing.

BOOK
You like it... Don't you?

Rachel, confused, protests:

RACHEL
No... You just stop

But she doesn't really want to. Book grins:

BOOK
(mock alarm)
Next thing you know you'll be off
drinking beer and racing motorcycles.

And it goes on... Rachel alternately protesting and laughing.

ANGLE THE BARN DOOR

As Eli suddenly appears. He glowers for an instant,
thunderstruck, then BELLOWS:

ELI
Rachel!

THE SCENE

As Book and Rachel's dancing comes to a sudden halt. Both
turn, look at Eli. Rachel regards him level-eyed, without
discernible alarm. Book, looking a bit sheepish, goes over,
turns off the radio, as:

ELI
(in the dialect)
What is this? This Myusick?

Book hesitates, then starts to say something:

BOOK
It's not her fault. I

But he gets such a look from Eli that he turns, goes out.

ELI
(in the dialect)
How can this be? How can you do such
a thing? Is this plain? Is this the
ordnung?

RACHEL
I have done nothing against the
ordnung.

ELI
(in the dialect)
Eh? Nothing? Rachel, you bring this
man to our house. With his gun of
the hand. You bring fear to this
house. Fear of English with guns
coming after. You bring blood and
whispers of more blood. Now English
music... and you are dancing to
English music! And you call this
nothing?

RACHEL
I have committed no sin.

ELI
(in English)
No sin? Maybe. Not yet. But, Rachel,
it does not look...
(tone softening... in
the dialect)
Don't you know there has been talk?
Talk about you, not him. Talk about
going to the Bishop. About having
you... shunned!

RACHEL
That is idle talk.

ELI
(in English, pleading)
Do not make light of it, Rachel.
They can do it... quick! Like that!
And then... then I can not sit at
table with you. I can not take a
thing from your hand. I... I can not
go with you to meeting!
(the old man almost
breaks down as, in
the dialect)
Rachel, good Rachel, you must not go
too far! Dear child!

Rachel is annoyed also touched, no doubt, by the old man's
plea but irked by his condescending tone.

RACHEL
I am not a child.

ELI
(suddenly stern again)
You are acting like one!

RACHEL
I will be the judge of that.

ELI
(fierce as a prophet)
No! They will be the judge of that!
And so will I... if you shame me!

RACHEL
(blinking a tear now,
but meeting his gaze)
You shame yourself.

And shaken but proud and erect she turns and walks out.

INT. SCHAEFFER'S OFFICE NIGHT

Carter sits, Schaeffer prowls... slowly, letting silences
grow before he strikes again with another softly-snarled
question or statement.

SCHAEFFER
You know where he is.

CARTER
Wrong.

SCHAEFFER
You'd lie to protect him.

CARTER
(cool)
Probably.

Schaeffer snaps around, glares at him.

SCHAEFFER
You admit you're lying?

CARTER
(shakes head)
I admit I don't know where he is.

SCHAEFFER
You're the first one he'll contact.

CARTER
(sighing)
He's got my number.

Schaeffer stops, stands in front of Carter, takes a deep
breath... suddenly smiles. And is abruptly (as he is capable
of being) the man of charm and gentlemanly reason. He even
CHUCKLES as he begins:

SCHAEFFER
It's funny. I know he's hiding
somewhere with the Amish, I know it.
(a quick glance at
Carter)
Can you imagine John Book at a prayer
meeting? Our John Book?

Schaeffer CHUCKLES again, looks hopefully again at Carter.

Carter looks back, stony-eyed. Schaeffer makes another abrupt
shift in form... but still speaks softly.

SCHAEFFER
Either you're a member of the club
or you aren't, Elton.
(he nods his head, as)
Tell me what you know...

CARTER
What I know, Paul, is...
(nodding his head)
He's going to take you out...

EXT. LAPP FARM LANCASTER COUNTY DAY

As Book pauses by the barn door, glances over his shoulder.

HIS POV BUGGY

With trace horse harnessed... Samuel and Eli loading
provisions into the buggy, standing down by the house.

BACK TO BOOK INT. / EXT. BARN

As he goes into the barn.

Book approaches Luke's stall warily... and as he does so the
temperamental mule, reacting to form, starts to skitter, his
hooves CRACKING against the walls of the stall. Book flinches.

Book starts to talk gently to the animal:

BOOK
All right, you nasty son of a bitch,
we're going to be friends whether
you like it or not.

Then, summoning his resolve, he carefully opens the stall
gate.

ANGLE

As Luke eyes him balefully, Book reaches into his pocket,
brings out some lumps of sugar.

BOOK
See... Sugar. You like sugar, don't
you for Christ's sake?

Finally, keeping a mistrustful eye on Book, Luke condescends
to eat. Book nods with satisfaction.

ANOTHER ANGLE

Rachel has entered the barn, is watching Book with a puzzled
expression.

RACHEL
(surprised)
Well...

Book turns, grins with some pride of accomplishment!

BOOK
Won him over just like that.

RACHEL
I see.
(and)
But I hope you have a lot of sugar.
(then, going)
Eli is ready to go to Zook's.

Just then Luke skitters impatiently... Book gives him a
nervous look; one last tentative pat as Luke eyes him
skeptically, then closes the stall gate and turns to go:

BOOK
Later.

And we...

EXT. ZOOK FARM LANCASTER COUNTY DAY

BIG SHOT... it's early morning as the Amish buggies are
arriving at the Zook farm for a barn-raising.

In the b.g. we can see big stacks of lumber all around the
construction site where a couple of dozen men have begun
raising the main supports on the already laid foundation.

Elsewhere, long tables have been set up and women are
spreading them with cloths, setting out big tanks of hot
coffee and cold lemonade for the men,

LAPP BUGGY

As Eli, Book, Rachel and Samuel step down, Book eyes the
construction site.

ELI
Wait here 'til I find a gang you can
work with.

He goes. Book glances around as even more buggies arrive and
more workmen and their families climb out.

Eli appears with Hochstetler in tow. Hochstetler's broad
face breaks into a grin:

HOCHSTETLER
Book! Good to see you!

He pumps Book's hand with his usual vigor, smiling a greeting
and pleasantry to Rachel. She looks on, amused.

Hochstetler gives Rachel a look, and we realize that his
showing up just now to appropriate Book was no happenstance.

And Book realizes it as well.

HOCHSTETLER
Eli says you're a carpenter, Book.

BOOK
It's been a while.

HOCHSTETLER
No matter. Come with me. We can always
use a good carpenter.

With that he throws a huge arm around Book's shoulder and
ushers him away. Rachel calls after them:

RACHEL
Good luck.

BOOK / HOCHSTETLER

As they move off.

HOCHSTETLER
Your hole is healed, then?

BOOK
(gives him a look)
Pretty much.

Hochstetler nods with satisfaction:

HOCHSTETLER
Good. Then you can go home.

DISSOLVE TO:

CUTS

As the morning progresses:

...Book and Hochstetler sawing and augering out heavy timbers
on big sawhorses. There's an unmistakable atmosphere of
competition between the two men, which doesn't go entirely
unnoticed by the half-dozen or so other young men on the
gang.

...or, indeed, by Rachel; in fact, she seems without leaning
on it too heavily to be measuring the two men as the morning
progresses, and she occasionally passes within proximity of
them.

...Eli and a couple of other elders prowling the job with
sheaves of hand-drawn sketches under their arms, supervising
the construction. All around them the structure is rising
with remarkable rapidity.

...Rachel, where she's helping the women set out the huge
noon meal. Other women are sitting on benches in the b.g.,
knitting or doing quiltwork.

...Samuel, where he's banging away with a hammer, with a
group of boys his own age. Elsewhere we see little girls
"botching" (a hand-clapping game played to German rhymes).

...The very elderly; sitting on the grass or in wheelchairs
in the sunlight, looking on the old men kibitzing in German,
the women gossiping.

Until...

BIG SHOT

Of the barn-raising with the noon sun high overhead... at
least a hundred and fifty men are swarming over and about
the barn framework...

...some aid the rafters, some hauling lumber to the job,
others sawing, hammering, drilling, joining, planing and
what-all... so many that the barn seems almost to be rearing
up before our very eyes. And there isn't a power tool in
sight.

WOMEN'S AREA

As Rachel crosses near the benches... we can see other women
eyeing her, whispering among themselves, some tittering.
Rachel ignores them.

She joins the stoutly amiable Mrs. Yoder from the funeral
sequence earlier. The older woman is emptying a big pan of
fried chicken into serving platters. She smiles, obviously
liking Rachel.

MRS. YODER
Everyone has an idea about you and
the English.

RACHEL
All of them charitable, I'm sure.

MRS. YODER
Hardly any of them.

ANGLE THE ROOFBEAM

Book and Hochstetler astride the roofbeam studs, holding
them together prior to nailing them to the roof-beam. They
are, therefore, crotch to the mast and facing one another,
way out at the far end of the roof.

Suddenly, as Hochstetler raises his hammer, the studs start
to part, threatening to de-ball the both of them.

Hochstetler drops his hammer, grabs both sides of the roof
with incredible brute strength, and, literally, pulls it
back together.

Book stares at Hochstetler with nothing short of awe.

Hochstetler, straining and grinning, looks to Book:

HOCHSTETLER
Nail it!

BOOK
Yes, sir.

And he does nail it while Hochstetler, grinning and holding,
looks on.

DISSOLVE TO:

BIG SHOT

The barn is done, the workmen climbing down from the rafters.
It's late afternoon.

ANGLE ON BOOK

He hesitates. His face is pale and covered with sweat. The
exertion of the day has taken its toll. He's in danger of
fainting and is some forty feet above the ground. But he's
determined it won't happen, determined that he won't fall,
nor will he humiliate himself by calling for help. Hochstetler
guesses the situation. He moves beside Book, claps an arm
about him, says nothing, doesn't even look at Book. From
below, someone TELLS them to hurry up.

Hochstetler shouts:

HOCHSTETLER
We admire our work!

The moment passes for Book, and he's okay. Hochstetler removes
his supporting arm. Book looks him in the eye, nods his
appreciation almost imperceptibly. Hochstetler wants no
thanks, and Book knows it. Hochstetler gives him a resounding
SLAP on the back, and starts climbing down. Book follows.

EXT. ZOOK FARM LANCASTER COUNTY EVENING

The gathering has congregated to hear Bishop Tschantz offer
up a blessing on the new barn.

CONGREGATION

PANNING the faces as they listen to the heavy German words
rolling out over the still evening air.

Book stands a little to one side of the Amish. The prayers
he cannot share with them. Rachel is aware of this, feels
something of his emotion. She looks toward him, then she too
closes her eyes and drifts away from him, into the soothing
prayer.

CUT TO:

EXT. LAPP FARM NIGHT

Book stands outside, listening to the NIGHT SOUNDS. He turns,
walks up toward the porch.

EXT. PORCH TARP FARMHOUSE NIGHT

Book takes a seat in a chair, SIGHS, looks toward the night
sky.

There is a SOUND, but it's a moment before he turns his eyes
toward the door.

ANGLE THE DOOR

Samuel standing there in his nightshirt.

BACK TO SCENE

As Book leans forward in his chair.

BOOK
Hey, Sam...

SAMUEL
...I want to say a thing.

BOOK
(sitting up)
What's that, Sam?

The boy hesitates, holds for a time, then suddenly darts
across to Book, wraps his arms around him, hugs him tightly...
then breaks away, turns and runs hack into the house, leaving
the door open behind him.

ANGLE BOOK

Looking after the boy, genuinely moved. After a moment, he
speaks softly:

BOOK
Same to you, Sam.

After another moment, he gets up, moves to close the door
that Samuel has left open behind him.

ANOTHER ANGLE BOOK

From the lighted/shadowed area outside the door. He comes to
the door, starts to close it, then hesitates, looks into see
where the light is coming from. He looks down the corridor.
The light is obviously coming from the kitchen. He speaks
softly:

BOOK
Sam?

No answer. Book steps inside, pulls the door shut behind
him, moves down-the corridor toward the kitchen.

INT. LAPP WASHHOUSE NIGHT

Where Rachel, dressed only in a plain cotton camisole, is
pouring a pail of steaming water into a tub.

She replaces the pail on the stove, turns and slips out of
her camisole. Naked, she folds the garment across the back
of a chair.

Then she pauses, containing a startled intake of breath.

RACHEL'S POV FRYING PAN

The gleaming bottom of a large copper skillet hanging over
the stove with other cookware, we can see Book's image
reflected there, framed in the kitchen doorway.

BACK TO SCENE

Rachel hesitates for a moment and in that moment she makes
a choice.

Slowly she turns, to face him, without shame, meeting his
eyes.

And for a moment she attempts something: a look, a flash of
eve... a lovely, heartbreakingly innocent effort to become,
for an instant, a woman of Book's world.

BOOK

As he stands in the doorway, willing himself to leave, unable
to make it happen.

And suddenly the moment has passed. Rachel lowers her eyes,
picks up the camisole, covers herself with it without putting
it on, looks away.

BOOK

TIGHTENING to him, and...

CUT TO:

EXT. LAPP FARM DAWN

REESTABLISHING...

ANGLE HEN YARD

Where Rachel is scattering feed to the chickens.

A beat, then Book approaches from behind her. A moment, as
she senses his presence.

Book watches as Rachel begins to gather the eggs, placing
them in the fold of her apron.

When he speaks, he speaks softly, and she pauses in her work.

BOOK
Last night.

She goes very still, but keeps her back to him.

BOOK
If... we'd made love, then, I couldn't
leave.

She lowers her head slightly, but remains turned away from
him.

Book continues to stare at her.

EXT. RURAL ROAD LANCASTER COUNTY DAY

The Lapp carriage on a winding lane.

INT. BUGGY (MOVING)

Rachel is driving, Book sitting next to her. Samuel is in
the back, looking out the rear window and not paying any
attention to the adults.

A beat, then a large produce truck roars past them. It's all
Book can do to keep from flinching.

Rachel stares straight ahead. Book glances at her.

BOOK
Maybe I ought to learn to drive this
thing.

Rachel says nothing.

BOOK
(beat)
Pick myself up another useful skill.

Now Rachel can't help but smile. She looks at him. And...

EXT. ANGLE

We can see the Lapp buggy approaching a rural intersection,
another buggy approaching at right angles.

INT. LAPP BUGGY

As Rachel eyes the other buggy through the windshield.

RACHEL
Samuel, who is that?

Samuel checks out the buggy.

SAMUEL
It looks like Hochstetler's mare.

EXT. ANGLE

As the Lapp buggy passes the intersection and the Hochstetler
buggy swings in behind them. Then the Hochstetler buggy,
coming on at a faster clip, starts to pass the Lapp buggy.

INT. LAPP BUGGY

As Rachel waves at the occupants of the other buggy; Daniel
returns her greeting:

BOOK
(teasing her)
Uh oh, they're leaving us behind.

Rachel gives him a look, and... gives the reins a flick
the race is on.

RACE MONTAGE

Hochstetler has a couple of older folk on board, together
with his young sister at first they're not aware of the
race, until Daniel can contain his excitement no longer and
gives his horse a couple of whoops. The buggies are neck and
neck, and the older people are not protesting loudly.

It's all Book can do to refrain from grabbing the reins off
Rachel, but she's something of a horsewoman and finally she
gains the edge and pulls ahead of Hochstetler, to the cheers
of Samuel and Book.

EXT. SALZBURGSTORE DAY

It's a Saturday afternoon in the tourist season, and they're
everywhere taking shots of anything Amish. There's a ROWDY
YOUNG ELEMENT amongst them who are making their presence
fast, and generally making a nuisance of themselves.

Book and Rachel get out of the buggy. Samuel stays inside;
the crowds make him nervous. A huge tourist bus billowing
smoke pulls up nearby.

Rachel enters the store, but before Book can follow he's
stopped by a TOURIST LADY with an instamatic camera... She
waggles the camera at him...

TOURIST LADY
Could I... ah, you know?

BOOK
(smiling)
Lady, if you take my picture, I'll
rip your brassiere off and strangle
you with it.

The Tourist Lady stares at him in stunned disbelief, her
grin frozen on her face. Then she begins to scuttle back
from whence she came.

INT. STORE

Rachel is browsing among the stocked shelves in the company
of a young Amish woman, Ellie Beiler. Rachel is carrying
Ellie's tiny baby, and the infant is getting as much attention
as the shopping.

Book is standing at a wall pay phone in the b.g. We TIGHTEN
to him, and...

BOOK
Lieutenant Elton Carter, please.

A beat, then we hear the FILTERED VOICE of the Philadelphia
Police Department switchboard:

VOICE
Are you a member of the family?

BOOK
What? I'm a friend of his.

VOICE
I'm sorry. Last night Sergeant Carter
was killed in the line of duty...

Book hangs up. His breathing is thrown out by the shock of
the news and he takes a couple of deep breaths to regain
control. He hesitates, unsure of his next move. He makes to
move away, then he turns back, finds more coins and dials a
second number.

INT. HALLWAY, SCHAEFFER'S HOME DAY

Schaeffer's wife answers the phone; she is momentarily
shocked.

She calls for her husband, then makes polite conversation.

MRS. SCHAEFFER
How are you, John?

Paul Schaeffer appears, slightly irritated at being called
away from the Saturday afternoon game.

MRS. SCHAEFFER
(covering mouthpiece)
John Book!

SCHAEFFER
I'll take it in the study.

INT. STUDY / STORE DAY

Schaeffer takes the phone.

SCHAEFFER
You can hang up, dear.

We HEAR the click of the other phone,

BOOK
You made a mistake, Paul. You
shouldn't have taken Elton out.

SCHAEFFER
(beat)
How bad did Mac get you? We figured
pretty bad.

BOOK
I'm fine. I'm going to live a long
time. That's what I called to tell
you.

SCHAEFFER
(quickly)
Johnny

BOOK
You might want to pass it along to
Mac.

SCHAEFFER
(urgently)
Listen to me, Johnny. Come in! You're
out there all alone... We're getting
close... real close... Maybe if you
listen to me for a minute we can
work something out so you can come
in

BOOK
I've already got something worked
out.
(and)
Be seeing you.

Book hangs up the phone and the dead CLICK registers on
Schaeffer.

Book has gripped the phone so tightly that it takes a second
to unclench his fist. Then it takes something else to resist
his first impulse, which is to smash out at something...
Training. Get it under control. Deal rationally with the
situation.

He straightens his jacket, wipes the sweat/tears from his
eyes, turns and walks stiffly out of the Saltzburg General
Store.

INT. BUGGY MAIN STREET SALTZBURG DAY

Book, as Rachel eyes him. She has noticed his changed mood,
but doesn't ask about it. He stares straight ahead, oblivious
to the surroundings of the street, now crawling with tourists
and traffic.

EXT. NARROW SIDE STREET SALTZBURG DAY

The buggy turns into the side street. Some hundred yards
ahead another buggy is stopped in the middle of the road
several youths gathered about it. A pickup truck is stopped,
facing the buggy.

INT. LAPP BUGGY DAY

As Rachel approaches the scene, slowing down and finally
stopping.

Rachel is at first puzzled, then makes a small face, looks
at Book.

Rachel puts a restraining hand on Book's arm.

RACHEL
Do nothing. This happens from time
to time.

She senses him about to get out, grips his arm tightly.

RACHEL
It's not our way, John. We'll have
nothing to do with violence! John!

Book shakes free, gets out and slowly walks toward the...

EXT. HOCHSTETLER'S BUGGY DAY

Hochstetler and his family sit, impassive, ignoring various
jeers and taunts from the English lads various jokes about
them being dirty etc. One jabs an ice cream cone into
Hochstetler's forehead, which leaves a curious white circle
on his forehead. Another fools about with the horse causing
it to shy. A third notices the slow, sure, approach of John
Book.

YOUTH
Here comes another one!

Book stops, his path blocked by the third youth. The youth
flicks off Book's hat.

BOOK
(quietly)
You're making a mistake.

Hochstetler calls from his buggy.

HOCHSTETLER
Everything is all right, John.

BOOK
(to the youth)
Pick up the hat.

The youth momentarily unsure something about Book's tone
of voice. The youth does pick up the hat, crumples it, stamps
on it, and puts it back at a crazy angle on Book's head. A
pause, then Book explodes.

The kid never knew what hit him or where it came from, he
hits the road surface already unconscious. A second youth
grabs Book from behind. A mistake. Book is smashing into
him, spatters of blood from his nose flying in all directions.
He's hitting too hard, too often. It's Schaeffer he's hitting.
Hochstetler is pulling him away, Rachel is there too. A crowd
is gathering, but as suddenly as it began it's over. Book
shakes Hochstetler off him, straightens his hat, and in a
kind of daze, begins walking past the scene in the direction
of the Lapp farm.

The youths are picking up their wounded, helping them back
to their truck, aided by none other than Hochstetler. An OLD
LOCAL addresses Rachel.

LOCAL MAN
Never seen anything like that in all
my years.

RACHEL
(covering)
He's from... Ohio... My cousin.

LOCAL MAN
We'll, them Ohio Amish sure must be
different.
(addresses a gathering
crow)
Our Lancaster brethren, they just
don't have that kind of fight in
them.

RACHEL
John, lost control of himself. He...
will be repentant.

LOCAL MAN
(to Rachel)
You're Rachel Lapp, aren't you?

RACHEL
Yes. Samuel! We're going.

A second man calls from the pickup.

SECOND MAN
Kid's nose is broken!

LOCAL MAN
We'll take him up the hospital. Good-
day to you, Mrs. Lapp.
(he shouts after her)
This ain't good for the tourist trade,
you know! You tell that to your Ohio
cousin!

But Rachel is already steering past the scene and following
the by now distant figure of John Book.

EXT. BARN / CARPENTER'S SHOP DUSK

Book comes out of the carpenter's shop carrying the repaired
birdhouse on its pole in one hand, a shovel in the other.

Rachel is shepherding the milking cows toward the barn.

RACHEL
You should not bother with that
birdhouse.
(a beat)
If you're leaving tomorrow.

BOOK
I'm leaving tonight.
(and)
I'm going to need my clothes. And my
gun.

She nods, looks away... looks back at him twice in glances.
There is a moment when it appears she might either bark at
him or begin to weep. He waits. When she does turn to him,
she speaks softly:

RACHEL
There was a time when I thought you
might have stayed.

BOOK
(hesitating... then)
There was.

RACHEL
There was a time when I would have
welcomed it.

BOOK
(after a beat)
I know.

RACHEL
(asking)
I was being foolish?

BOOK
No.
(and)
I was being unrealistic. Even thinking
about living this life.

RACHEL
You're so sure of that?

BOOK
Aren't you? After today?

RACHEL
(almost conceding it,
but... her voice
rising a bit, annoyed)
I'm not so sure of anything as you
are, John Book. You could live this
life if you wanted to bad enough.
(a beat)
Just as I could live yours!

BOOK
(almost groaning)
Oh, come on, Rachel. No way.

RACHEL
There is always a way! But you are
such a... a Glotzkopp you cannot
see! You'd rather go back to that
city! To nothing! No woman! No
children! No land!

BOOK
(now getting annoyed)
Land! Are you crazy? I'm no Amishman
and I'm no farmer! I'm a cop. That's
what I know and that's what I do!

RACHEL
What you do is take vengeance! Which
is a sin against heaven!

BOOK
That's your way, not mine.

RACHEL
That's God's way!

BOOK
Well in the City of Philadelphia,
God needs a little help!

He has offended her, immediately knows it, but can't bring
himself to make an instant apology. But he's chewing on it
when she takes the moment unto herself. She pulls herself
up, speaks with great dignity:

RACHEL
I could never love a man who was
so... little.

He looks at her, sad-eyed, his anger ebbing and gone,
realizing that he'll never meet a finer woman... never even
get close to such a one. He appears to start to speak, but
then does not.

She turns, moves away a few steps, stops, looks back at him.
she holds for a moment, blinking tears, then speaks with
some difficulty, emotion welling in her words.

RACHEL
The other night... when you saw me
after my bath... I... I tried to
look as I thought you would want a
woman to look.
(sadly... but with a
slight, proud lift
of chin)
I am sorry... that I did not.

She holds for an instant, then turns and walks off.

BOOK

Looking after her. A face full of loss.

INT. KITCHEN DUSK

Eli is lighting the lamps. Samuel reads a book at the kitchen
table. Rachel moves slowly to the sink and begins washing a
few dishes. She looks out the window.

CLOSE on her face, a strange expression.

INT. / EXT RACHEL'S POV DUSK

The distant figure of Book working on the birdhouse.

INT. KITCHEN

CLOSE on Rachel's hands, lifting items slowly up and of the
water to the draining board, where she places them carefully
down. She shakes the water off her hands.

CLOSE on her face, still staring fixedly out the window. She
speaks without turning around.

RACHEL
Eli, would you see Samuel to bed?

The old man glances at her; this is not their routine.

EXT. DRIVEWAY DUSK

In the rapidly fading light, Rachel walks slowly toward Book.

CLOSE on her face, staring straight ahead toward Book.

ANGLE on Book, CLOSE. He turns and watches Rachel's approach.

BIG WIDE ANGLE

The light now nearly gone, the NIGHT SOUNDS beginning, as
Rachel reaches Book and they embrace.

EXT. FIELD BY ROAD NIGHT

Book and Rachel in a passionate embrace, sink to the still
warm earth and make love.

EXT. SOUDERSBURG CAFE LANCASTER COUNTY NIGHT

ESTABLISHING an all-night cafe in the early hours of the
morning.

TIGHTENING to the bleakly lighted windows.

INT. CARE

A booth, where Schaeffer and McElroy and Fergie, a Lancaster
County Undersheriff and his SHERIFF an expansive politician
type are seated.

The Undersheriff eyes Schaeffer narrowly. The Sheriff has a
county map spread out on the table, amid breakfast dishes,
pointing directions to Schaeffer:

SHERIFF
There... White Oak Road a couple of
miles before it ties into two-twenty-
two. Got it?

SCHAEFFER
Got it. We owe you one, Sheriff.

SHERIFF
My man Holmes here put it together.
Fine officer, Chief. He spoke to the
doctor at the hospital.

SCHAEFFER
Undersheriff Holmes and I have talked
on the phone.
(nods at Holmes)
Good work.

UNDERSHERIFF
Sure you don't want us to post some
backup units?

SCHAEFFER
If we need any help, we'll give you
a shout. I'd like to slip in there
quiet, then get out before we attract
any attention.

EXT. CAFE PORCH DAY

As Schaeffer and his men are climbing into their car. Holmes
and the Sheriff watch after them.

HOLMES
Maybe I'll take a drive over that
way.

SHERIFF
Let 'em be. It's their dirty laundry.

But Holmes pauses to watch Schaeffer's car pull out.

EXT. RURAL LANE LANCASTER COUNTY DAWN

With the first light of dawn on the eastern horizon,
Schaeffer's car approaches along the lane, pulls into the
Lapp driveway and comes to a halt.

In the b.g. we can make out the farmhouse and outbuildings.

HOLD as Schaeffer, McElroy and Fergie step out of the car.
They break out short-barreled twelve-gauge pumps, start TOWARD
CAMERA, spreading out as they turn up the long driveway...
figures of ominous intent striding through the misty dawn.

ANGLE

GOING WITH the trio of gunmen... McElroy, breath smoking in
the chill, eyes the terrain:

MCELROY
Weird, man. No fuckin' electricity.
What do you figure they plug all
their shit into?

SCHAEFFER
They don't have any shit.

INT. KITCHEN DAWN

Where Eli is getting into a heavy coat, preparing to go out...
the remains of the hearty morning breakfast are on the table.
Rachel is beginning the dishes.

INT. BARN DAWN

Book and Samuel are starting the morning milking...

INT. KITCHEN DAWN

Eli is preparing to extinguish the lamp when suddenly the
kitchen door is kicked open and McElroy and Fergie weapons
leveled, burst in. Eli reacts with angry shock as Schaeffer
enters: Rachel is, for a moment, terrified.

SCHAEFFER
(to Fergie)
Outside
(to Mac)
Check out the rest of the house.

He turns to Eli, who is standing in the middle of the room.

Schaeffer flashes his badge:

SCHAEFFER
We're police officers. We're looking
for a fugitive, John Book. He's living
here?

ELI
I have nothing to say to you. Get
out of my house!

SCHAEFFER
You speak English. Good. Now listen


RACHEL
(recovering)
No, you listen. Get out!

SCHAEFFER
Lady, I'm here to help you. This man
is very dangerous. An armed criminal.
(ingratiating)
He's got a gun, hasn't he?

RACHEL
You have no right here!

McElroy re-enters.

MCELROY
He's not in this building.

SCHAEFFER
(to Eli)
All right, where is he?

Suddenly Eli SHOUTS: It's deafening. Probably the loudest
noise Eli has ever made:

ELI
John Book!

McElroy whips around, smashes Eli on the temple with the
butt of his shotgun. Eli crumples to the floor. Rachel
SCREAMS, runs to Eli.

INT. BARN DAY

Book and Samuel in the milkhouse. They've heard Eli's outcry.
Book moves to the window, looks out.

BOOK'S POV FERGIE

About halfway between the barn and the house. He turns from
glancing back toward the house (having heard Eli's shout)
and starts again toward the barn. Gun at the ready.

INT. BARN DAY

As Book REACTS.

INT. KITCHEN DAY

Rachel kneeling next to Eli, wiping at his bruise with a
damp cloth. Schaeffer looks on.

SCHAEFFER
He'll live.

RACHEL
You might have killed him!

SCHAEFFER
(to McElroy)
Find Fergie, check the barns. I'll
watch these two.

McElroy nods, moves outside, turns toward the barns.

INT. BARN DAY

Book still at the window, Samuel now beside him, trying to
get a look.

SAMUEL
Is it them?

BOOK
(turning, mind racing)
It's them, Sam.
(he bends to the boy,
takes him by the
shoulders)
Now, Sam, listen to me and listen to
me carefully. Listen to me as you
never listened before.

SAMUEL
(interrupting)
Are they going to kill you?

BOOK
Listen to me, Sam! I want you to go
across the new corn to Stoltzfus'.
Run as fast as you can. And stay
there!

SAMUEL
What are you going to do?

BOOK
I'll be all right. You just do as I
say.

He takes Samuel by the hand, leads him to the side door. He
bends, holds the boy close.

SAMUEL
Don't let them hurt you.

BOOK
(rising, pushing Samuel
toward door)
I won't. Now run.
(as Sam looks back)
Fast as you can!

Sam turns, takes off.

EXT. REAR DOOR DAY

Samuel running.

EXT. BARN DAY

Fergie almost to the upper barn, McElroy well back and
moving slowly, circumspectly headed toward the lower barn.

INT. BARN DAY

Book, at another window in the lower barn, sees McElroy
heading for the milkhouse door. He can't see Fergie. He turns,
crosses the cowpen area, climbs an inner ladder leading to
the upper barn.

EXT. BARN DAY

Fergie at the door to the upper barn, moving very cautiously,
gun up. He eases around the doorpost, looks within.

INT. BARN ANGLE PAST BOOK

Beyond Book, now at the top of the ladder, we see Fergie
easing into the barn. Book pulls himself up, crawls behind
the wall of the mule stalls, opens gate, eases in beside
Luke, urgently whispering and patting the animal to calm
him. He gets to the animal's head, crouches, strokes Luke's
nose. The mule's huge flanks quiver, his nostril's and eyes
widen, but he makes no untoward sound. Book closes the gate.

BACK TO FERGIE

He comes on warily, muzzle first, eyes darting.

DOLLYING WITH him as he reaches the first mule's stall, opens
the gate. An edgy mule turns, eyes him, shuffles nervously.
Fergie backs off, moves on.

BOOK

As he listens, tenses, hearing Fergie's feet in the fresh
straw.

Book eases back alongside Luke, waits.

BACK TO FERGIE

As he approaches Luke's stall, reaches for the gate-latch.

BOOK FLASH CUT

As the gate swings open, Book shouts and gives Luke a whack
on the back. The mule's pent-up nerves and feral energy
explode in an horrendous SCREAM.

FERGIE

Bowled backwards by the rearing animal as the gate flies
open, involuntarily FIRING, suddenly finding himself under
the lethal hooves of a twelve-hundred pound beast. Staggering
backwards, he SCREAMS, FIRES again, the load striking the
mule in its heaving chest as a flailing hoof smashes into
Fergie's head and the other hoof snaps his shotgun in half
like a matchstick.

BOOK

As he slips out of the stall, ducks toward the rear of the
barn.

FERGIE

Fallen, skull smashed... and now the dying Luke's legs buckle
and he collapses atop Fergie.

EXT. BARN DAY

McElroy standing still, shock-eyed, looking toward the sound
of the shots. Then starting slowly forward.

SCHAEFFER

On the porch of the house, looking toward the barn.

EXT. FIELD DAY

Some distance from the barn, Samuel's hearing the shots,
stops dead in his tracks... the sound of the shots still
REVERBERATING across the quiet fields.

SAMUEL
(stricken)
Mr. Book?

He hesitates, then turns, starts trotting back toward the
barns.

EXT. / INT. KITCHEN PORCH DAY

Rachel has moved into the open kitchen door, glances anxiously
toward the barns. Starts out. Schaeffer pushes her back.

SCHAEFFER
Get back in there.

RACHEL
My son is out there!

SCHAEFFER
Nobody's going to hurt your son...

EXT. BARN DAY

As McElroy, checking the safety on his twelve-gauge, steps
into the barn.

INT. BARN DAY

McElroy flattens himself against the wall, looks around
fearfully.

MCELROY
(softly)
Fergie?

Only silence.

EXT. FRONT PORCH DAY

Schaeffer staring toward the barn, SHOUTS:

SCHAEFFER
What the hell happened?

He listens, hears nothing, snorts, starts toward the barn
checking his gun, not hurrying.

INT. KITCHEN DAY

Eli now seated at the table, holding a cloth to his head.

Rachel at a window, peering out. Schaeffer on the porch

EXT. FIELD DAY

Samuel running as fast as he can trips as he crosses a small
muddy stream, falls full length, scrambles up, runs on.

INT. BARN DAY

McElroy, moving very cautiously, comes around the mule stalls,
stops short, stares off screen.

HIS POV FERGIE

Where he lies half buried beneath the huge bulk of the mule,
his head crushed like an eggshell.

BACK TO MCELROY

As he moves on around Fergie and the dead mule, planting
each foot as if he were walking in a mine field.

BOOK

Standing in shadow at the back of the barn next to a hay
mow.

HIS POV MCELROY

Moving toward the center of the barn.

BOOK

As he starts to move even further back, he nudges into a
rope fastened to the wall behind him, He looks at it, looks
up.

HIS POV THE ROPE

It runs from where it is fastened to the wall straight up to
the center roofbeam of the barn to a trolley fixed to a track
that runs the length of the roofbeam. Attached to this trolley
is a big hayfork (Paul Krantz has one), U-shaped, sharply-
pointed at each end of the U. the points hanging toward the
floor. The thing weighs about eighty pounds, and is suspended
in place by the rope anchored at the wall next to Book.

BACK TO BOOK

Keeping one eye on McElroy, he carefully begins to un-tie
the trip rope.

MCELROY

Moving out toward the center of the barn, almost under the
suspended hay fork. He stops short, listens. Then, either
spotting a moving shadow or hearing a SOUND, he FIRES. His
shot rattles off the side of a manure spreader. He SHOUTS:

MCELROY
Book, you sneaky bastard, I know
you're here! Come out and fight!

EXT. BARNYARD DAY

Samuel, at the top of the barnyard, stops at the SOUND OF
THE SHOT, wide-eyed. He listens for an-instant, starts a
step toward the barn, then stops again, looks to a large
bell suspended in a cupola by one of the outbuildings. He
moves quickly to the bell, seizes the rope, pulls. The bell
CLANGS loudly, Sonorously.

SCHAEFFER

On the front porch, looking around for the location of the
sounding bell. He takes a step toward the barn, the stops,
looks back toward the house... frustrated.

INT. BARN DAY

Book watches as McElroy starts to move again looking back
toward the SOUNDING of the bell.

HIGH ANGLE HAY FORK

Looking down we can see McElroy almost directly beneath the
hay fork. The bell SOUNDING throughout. BOOK Waiting... trip
rope in hand. Then:

BOOK
(shouting)
Hey, Mac!

And he lets go the trip rope.

MCELROY

As he turns toward the SOUND of Book's voice.

HAY FORK

As it plummets down, causing a RATCHETING SOUND that fills
the barn, even drowns out the SOUND of the bell.

MCELROY

Eyes darting wildly, looking up.

HIS POV HAY FORK

Plunging straight for him.

MCELROY

Diving to one side.

ANGLE HAY FORK

THUDDING into the barn floor like a great trident fork.

Quivering there, not a foot from McElroy's head.

MCELROY

Staring at the fork pop-eyed.

BOOK

Sprinting toward a ladder thrust up through an opening in
the barn floor just in front of his parked car.

MCELROY

Spotting Book, coming up to one knee, quick-aiming, FIRING.
The shot smashes the windshield of the car.

BOOK

Diving, rolling, slamming into the top of the ladder, flailing
down out of sight.

MCELROY

FIRING AGAIN, then again. Emptying the gun, cursing as he
begins to reload, gets to his feet, starts toward the ladder.
The BELL still SOUNDING outside. The hood of the car SLOWLY
POPS UP.

ANGLE

As McElroy wheels at the movement of the car's hood, FIRES
twice.

MCELROY'S POV LAPP BUGGY

The buckshot virtually blows the dashboard off.

EXT. BARNYARD DAY

Samuel RINGING the bell. The bell rope is short, and so is
Samuel and his feet go off the ground with every swing of
the rockerarm.

He hangs on grimly, his black hat clinging to the back of
his head, his face set against the tears that move down his
cheeks.

SCHAEFFER

Comes hesitantly down the path toward the barn, looking toward
the sound of the bell, but also looking back in glances toward
the house to make sure Rachel and Eli stay where they are.
He still can't see Samuel.

HIS POV THE PORCH

As Rachel starts off the porch, takes a few steps.

SCHAEFFER

Turning, SHOUTING:

SCHAEFFER
You stay put!

RACHEL

She stops. She is also unable to see Samuel.

SCHAEFFER

Moving out toward the barn, rounding a corner... and there
is Samuel at the bellrope. He starts toward him.

EXT. FIELDS DAY

Beyond Samuel, well out in the fields of the Stoltzfus farm,
Stotlzfus and others including Hochstetler and his brothers
are baling the first cutting of June hay.

But the operation has come to a halt. All are looking in
toward the Lapp farm, hearing the RINGING OF THE BELL (the
Amish cry for help), wondering, hesitating.

But now, as we watch, led by Hochstetler, they start in toward
Samuel.

EXT. BARNYARD DAY

As Schaeffer reaches Samuel, SHOUTS:

SCHAEFFER
Cut that out!

Samuel looks at him, keeps on pulling.

Schaeffer quickly crosses to him, grabs him by the back of
the neck, tries to pull him off the bell rope. Samuel hangs
on grimly.

Schaeffer yanks hard, succeeds in yanking Samuel free, shoves
him roughly aside. Then Schaeffer turns, FIRES a shotgun
blast into the top of the bellrope. It still hangs by several
threads, so he FIRES again.

The rope drops to the ground. Schaeffer reloads, turns to
look at Samuel, just getting to his feet. A moment... when
Schaeffer, recognizing Samuel as the Amish kid who saw McElroy
kill Zenovich, perhaps thinks of disposing of the witness
right then and there.

But a glance toward the oncoming Amish gives him pause. He
SNARLS at Sam:

SCHAEFFER
Get down to the house and stay there!

Samuel gets to his feet, turns, trots off.

RACHEL

Already halfway out to the barn, running to gather Sam in
her arms... then to lead him back toward the house.

SCHAEFFER

Turning, starting very slowly toward the barn.

INT. BARN DAY

McElroy at the top of the ladder, looking down. Then easing
over, placing his feet on the rungs.

BOOK

He stands below in a cowpen, using the cows for cover. The
cows stare balefully at him. A large goat nuzzles him, hooks
at him with its horns. Book waits, watches.

HIS POV MCELROY

Visible to his knees as he eases down the ladder. He stops
at every rung to scrape his shoes free of the cowshit covering
the rungs.

BACK TO BOOK

He turns now to a door at the back of the pen. He un-hooks
it, pulls it open, moves inside.

ANOTHER ANGLE BOOK

He is now in a small passageway giving on to the entrance to
a nearly-empty silo. Above the entrance, a ladder (interior)
rises to the top of the structure.

Book looks in, and up. We should get the impression that
Book's been here before, expects what he sees.

WHAT HE SEES

Forty feet up, a patch of blue sky through an open hatch.

BACK TO BOOK

He steps through to the base of the ladder, then ducks beyond
it into the silo. There is about two feet of old silage
covering the floor. He turns, looks up the white walls.

HIS POV INSIDE SILO

An inside ladder runs to the top.

HIS POV KICKBOARD

Standing against the wall next to the entrance... . obviously
to be inserted as the silo is filled.

BOOK

Now, quickly, he ducks back out through the entrance, crosses
to the door to the cowpen, very cautiously peers out..

WHAT HE SEES

McElroy at the bottom of the ladder, looking in the other
direction (toward the milkhouse).

BACK TO BOOK

Very carefully he shoves the cowpen door (which opens outward
into the cowpen). It begins to swing very slowly open. Book
immediately turns, darts back into the silo.

MCELROY

Turning slowly toward the cowpen... then FIRES twice as his
eye catches the motion of the swinging door. His shots blow
half a row of Eli's precious tools off an adjacent wall.
McElroy reloads, starts across toward the door.

INT. KITCHEN

Old Eli, at the sight of Samuel, rises from the table.

ELI
Praise Gott!

Rachel stands aside as the old man embraces Samuel long and
hard.

She watches as he turns to the cupboard, takes down the big
family Bible. He crosses to the table, sets the book down,
places his hand on its pulls Samuel to the table beside him.

Rachel holds another beat as she stares at the old man
helplessly, then she rushes to where she hid Book's gun,
takes it down... her trembling hands take the bullets out of
the coffee jar. She drops several as she tries to figure out
how to open the chamber to load it.

In the b.g., Eli glances up, sees what she is about... he
rises and crosses to her. Samuel watches from the table.

ELI
(fiercely)
No, Rachel...

RACHEL
I have to help him!

Rachel somehow manages to open the chamber and begins to try
to load the bullets. Eli's callused hand closes over hers,
halting the action:

ELI
It is not our way!

Bullets are already CLATTERING to the floor from her trembling
fingers as she raises her eyes to Eli's.

A long beat as Rachel looks at him... Finally her fingers
release the pistol and it CLATTERS to the floor. She closes
her eyes.

Samuel, who has gotten up, moved to a window, watches Eli
and Rachel silently.

Eli leads her to the table, places her hands on the Bible
beneath his. They stand there and they pray.

INT. SILO DAY

Book finishes putting the kickboard into the entrance.

MCELROY

Moving among the cows, stepping cautiously between the
cowflops.

The goat nudges him once, then butts him rather firmly.
McElroy swats at him with the gun butt, moves to the door.
As he arrives, he HEARS a noise very slight from the
direction of the silo.

He enters the passage way, looks in toward the silo entrance,
He hesitates. Another slight noise. He steps in to the base
of the inner ladder, looks up.

HIS POV THE HATCH

The patch of blue sky, forty feet up.

BACK TO MCELROY

He frowns, reaches out, grabs a rung.

INT. BARN DAY

Schaeffer, easing toward the mule stalls, MUTTERS, CURSES
under his breath. Then he rounds the corner of the first
stall... and there is Fergie with Luke the mule on top of
him. Schaeffer stares, blinks... moves on spotting a spent
shotgun shell near the hayfork...

INT. SILO DAY

Book listening at the kickboard. SOUNDS of feet, shotgun
rattling against metal rungs, Book moves to the ladder on
his side, starts silently up.

MCELROY

Climbing with difficulty, shotgun clutched in one hand.

BOOK

He climbs up to the second kickboard, pauses, checks the
distance to the floor, starts upward again.

BARN YARD DAY

The Amish beginning to arrive. Sam comes running, pulls
Stoltzfus toward the door of the milkhouse as the other Amish
look at the shot-shattered bellrope. Rachel and Eli come
rapidly up the path toward the group.

INT. BARN DAY

Schaeffer finds another spent shotgun shell, crosses to the
ladder, looks down. He sets his shotgun down, takes out his
service revolver, starts down.

INT. SILO DAY

Book has reaches the third kickboard, about thirty feet from
the ground. He checks it, turns the thumb-screws that hold
it in place, places his hand on the handle, moves to one
side as best he can... hangs there, listening.

MCELROY

Rattling up the other ladder, approaching the third kickboard.

BOOK

Listening tensely, hearing McElroy arrive on the other side
of the kickboard. Then, deliberately, Book makes a fist,
raps on the board smartly once.

MCELROY

Startled, REACTING. He sets his feet, leans back against the
back wall of the ladder well, brings the shotgun up, puts
the muzzle against the kickboard, clicks off the safety.

BOOK

We HEAR with him the thump of the muzzle, the CLICK... and,
with marvelous speed, Book pulls the kickboard and drops it
to the floor.

McELROY FLASH CUT Staring in, stun-eyed, already falling
forward (having leaned his weight on the shotgun) as Book
seizes the shotgun by the barrel, pulls inward.

ANOTHER ANGLE

As McElroy pitches forward through the opening, SCREAMS and
GRABS as he plunges past Book. The shotgun FIRES as McElroy
manages to hold onto Book, and both men plunge thirty feet
to the bottom of the silo.

BOOK

He falls almost straight down, lands on his back, lies
stunned.

MCELROY

His forward motion has carried him across the silo. His head
bounds off the white brick wall about five feet up... and he
falls in a heap, blood gushing from his head, as...

TIGHT ON BOOK

Blinking, groaning, just beginning to stir... and, suddenly,
into the frame comes a hand with a pistol in it. The muzzle
is placed firmly against Book's temple.

WIDER

Schaeffer holding the pistol. He cocks the pistol, tenses as
if to FIRE (and he is actually about to)... when there is a
SOUND behind him. He snaps around.

WHAT HE SEES

Old Stoltzfus and Samuel standing in the kickboard opening
(Schaeffer having kicked the kickboard in when he heard the
shot from within the silo). They stand solemnly, looking on
as:

SCHAEFFER

He eases the hammer down on this pistol, speaks softly:

SCHAEFFER
Okay, Johnny. On your feet.

THE SCENE

As Book struggles to his feet Schaeffer holding the pistol
tight to Book's head. Book turns, sees Samuel and Stoltzfus,
blinks.

Schaeffer shoves Book toward the opening. As Book moves toward
Samuel, he speaks quietly:

BOOK
It's okay, Sam.

ANOTHER ANGLE

As Book and McElroy move out of the silo, down the passageway
toward the milkhouse, Stoltzfus and Sam (after a glance in
at the inert McElroy) follow and...

EXT. BARN DAY

As first Stoltzfus and Samuel, then Book and Schaeffer emerge
into the barnyard. Schaeffer has the muzzle of his pistol
pressed firmly against Book's throat, just below his jaw.

Schaeffer pulls up, frowning:

SCHAEFFER
Hold it.

WHAT HE SEES

The Amishmen gathered the Stoltzfus family, the Hochstetler
brothers, et al. All staring hard at Schaeffer and Book.

EXT. BARN / DRIVE DAY

From a high wide angle the final scene is played out.
Schaeffer and Book, now moving again slowly up the drive,
the Amish following along closely on both sides.

CLOSE ON BOOK

As Schaeffer prods Book forward, warily eyeing the Amish.

SCHAEFFER
Get back, you people!
(prodding)
Keep moving, Johnny...

Book takes a couple of steps further, then abruptly stops.
The Amish stand about close, staring, no one moving. Book
now slowly turns his head, looks at Schaeffer.

BOOK
You're going to have to do it right
here, Schaeffer.

SCHAEFFER
Don't try me, Johnny!

Eli steps forward, bloody cloth held to his head.

ELI
So... will you kill us all, then?

ANGLE

As Schaeffer's eyes waver between Book and Eli, Book slowly
turns until he is facing Schaeffer... the gun now leveled
and almost pressing against Book's chest. Book locks eyes
with Schaeffer.

Quietly:

BOOK
It's all over, Paul.

SCHAEFFER
Move! Or you die right here!

Book's right hand snakes out, grabs Schaeffer by the gunhand
wrist, twists viciously, Schaeffer SCREAMS in pain, the gun
falls out of his hand, he starts to his knees under the force
of Book's grip.

ANOTHER ANGLE

As Book bends, picks up the pistol, releases Schaeffer, pushes
him away. Schaeffer staggers against Hochstetler, who partly
to keep him from falling, and partly (it appears) to
congratulate him on his surrender wraps one brawny arm
around Schaeffer's shoulders, gives him a short approving
nod... holds Schaeffer as:

BOOK

Turning, looking into the crowd, finding Rachel. Their gazes
meet, hold for a long MOMENT. In the eyes of both we read
resignation... whatever there was between them has been
terribly damaged. It is almost certainly over for them, too.

EXT. BARN DAY

HIGH SHOT holding the moment.

EXT. LAPP FARM LATE AFTERNOON

The door opens and Book steps out, looking somehow strange
in his working suit. He looks about him, sees Samuel down by
the pond.

EXT. POND

He eases down beside Samuel. They both stare into the pond.

SAMUEL
Are you really ever coming back?

BOOK
Got to, Sam. You and I are going to
a courthouse together, put some people
behind bars.

SAMUEL
Have you got your gun on now?

BOOK
Sure have, Sam.

Sam grins. Book takes him in his arms, holds him.

EXT. HOUSE DAY

Book opens the door of the car, turns to find Rachel standing
there with his Amish hat in hand.

RACHEL
I want you to take this... to remember
by.

BOOK
Where's my baggy pants?

RACHEL
Here. Whenever you want them.

He wants to kiss her, but does not. Their eyes say it all.
Eli has a final word, SHOUTING from the porch.

ELI
You be careful, John Book! Out among
them English!

Book gets quickly into the car.

INT. /EXT. DRIVEWAY LAPP FARM DAY

As Book drives, he sees an open buggy coming down the hill
toward the farm, He slows as he passes, It's Daniel
Hochstetler. A long beat, and as they pass, Hochstetler gives
Book an expansive tip of his hat.

INT. BOOK'S CAR

Book turns to look back at his rival, a doubt in his eyes.

FREEZE FRAME.

FADE OUT

THE END

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