"In writing fiction, the more fantastic the tale, the plainer the prose should be. Don't ask your readers to admire your words when you want them to believe your story." - Ben Bova [ more quotes ]

TWIN PEAKS

Episode 1003

by

Harley Peyton

FIRST DRAFT: September 26, 1989

REVISIONS: October 3, 1989



ACT ONE

FADE IN:

EXT. GREAT NORTHERN HOTEL - DAY

Morning breaks over the stately hotel.

CUT TO:

INT. GREAT NORTHERN DINING ROOM - DAY

DALE COOPER, at the corner table, takes a sip of coffee and
orders breakfast from waitress TRUDY.

COOPER
Shortstack of griddlecakes, maple
syrup, lightly heated and a slice of
ham. Nothing beats the taste of maple
syrup when it collides with ham.

TRUDY
Griddlecakes, side a' ham. Warmup?

Cooper nods appreciatively. Trudy refills his cup, exits.
Cooper takes a sip, nearly hums with approval. Then looks up
to find AUDREY HORNE standing before him. Audrey smiles,
beautiful, rubs a little sleep out of her eyes.

AUDREY
Good morning, Colonel Cooper.

COOPER
Just Agent, Audrey. Special Agent.

AUDREY
(caressing the words)
Special Agent.

COOPER
Please. Sit down.

AUDREY
(unsure)
I'm in a hurry.

COOPER
For what?

She doesn't know what to say or do. So she offers a nervous
shrug instead.

COOPER
Audrey, that perfume you're wearing
is incredible.

AUDREY
Do you really think so?

Cooper takes a pen from his pocket, hands it to her with a
napkin.

COOPER
Write your name down for me.

AUDREY
(eager)
Okay.

She takes the pen and writes carefully, hands it back to
Cooper. He looks at it.

COOPER
Audrey, there's something you'd like
to tell me.

AUDREY
(blushing)
There is?

Beat. All she wants is to be close to him. Cooper produces a
note from his pocket.

COOPER
You slipped this under my door night
before last.

AUDREY
I did?

Cooper nods. Audrey comes clean.

AUDREY
I wanted to help you. For Laura.

COOPER
Were you and Laura friends?

AUDREY
(simply)
No.
(beat)
But I understand her. Better than
the rest.

COOPER
What is "One-Eyed Jack's?"

AUDREY
It's a place up north. Men go there.

COOPER
What about women?

AUDREY
(blushing again)
Women work there.

COOPER
Did Laura work there?

AUDREY
I don't know. Laura worked at my
father's department store.

COOPER
"Horne's?"

AUDREY
He named it after himself.

COOPER
(on to something)
Where at Horne's department store?

AUDREY
(she thinks)
At the perfume counter.

COOPER
(making the connection)
So did Ronette Pulaski.

AUDREY
(it must mean something)
Really?

Cooper looks up, sees SHERIFF TRUMAN and LUCY MORAN coming
towards him from the far end of the dining room. Cooper looks
at Audrey's writing.

COOPER
The right-ward slant in your
handwriting indicates a romantic
nature, Audrey. A heart that yearns.
Be careful.

AUDREY
(a whisper)
I do?

COOPER
I'm going to have to ask you to leave
now.

AUDREY
(sees the Sheriff,
flustered)
Police business.

Cooper nods, winks. Audrey blushes, rises.

AUDREY
Thank you for talking to me.

She leaves as Truman and Lucy reach the table, eager to hear
Cooper's news: the identity of Laura's killer. The Waitress
arrives with Cooper's breakfast.

COOPER
Two more coffees please.
(re: Audrey as she
exits)
Pretty girl.
(back to Truman and
Lucy)
Hungry? The griddlecakes are
outstanding.

TRUMAN
(sits; hushed, urgent)
Who killed Laura Palmer?

Truman and Lucy lean in, the suspense is killing them. Trudy
pours coffee for them, as Cooper takes a bite of griddlecake,
then, finally:

COOPER
Let me tell you about the dream I
had last night.

Truman nods at Lucy. She whips our a steno, pad and pencil.

TRUMAN
Tibet?

COOPER
No. You were there, Harry. And so
were you, Lucy. Do you have a sketch
artist?

TRUMAN
Andy sketches from time to time.

COOPER
Interesting. I dreamed it was Deputy
Hawk. Find out if Sarah Palmer has
had any disturbing dreams. If she
has, there may be important clues in
her dreams as well.

TRUMAN
Clues.

COOPER
My dream is a code waiting to be
broken. Break the code, solve the
crime.

LUCY
(writing, whispering)
Break the code, solve the crime.

COOPER
In my dream, Sarah Palmer saw her
daughter's killer crouched at the
foot of her bed. Hawk sketched a
picture of the killer. I got a phone
call from a one-armed man named Mike.
The killer's name was Bob.

TRUMAN
Bob and Mike?

COOPER
Different Bob. Different Mike. They
lived above a convenience store.
Mike couldn't stand the killing any
longer so he cut off his own arm.
Bob vowed he would kill again. So
Mike shot him.
(takes another bite)
Do you know where dreams come from,
Harry?

TRUMAN
Not specifically.

COOPER
(very happy)
Acetylcholine neurons fire high,
voltage impulses into the forebrain.
The impulses become pictures, the
pictures become your dream. But no
one knows why we choose these
particular pictures.

TRUMAN
Was that the end of your dream?

COOPER
(back to business)
Suddenly it was twenty-five years
later. I was old, sitting in a red
room. There was a midget in a red
suit and a beautiful young woman who
looked exactly like Laura Palmer.
The little man told me my favorite
gum was coming back in style and
didn't his cousin look exactly like
Laura Palmer?

TRUMAN
Which cousin?

COOPER
The beautiful girl. Sometimes her
arms bend back. She's filled with
secrets. Where they're from birds
sing a pretty song and there's always
music in the air. Then the midget
did a dance. Laura kissed me on the
mouth. And whispered the killer's
name in my ear.

TRUMAN
Who was it?

COOPER
I don't remember.

TRUMAN
Damn.

COOPER
Harry, our job is simple: break the
code, solve the crime.

Cooper finishes his pancakes.

LUCY
(still fascinated)
What does the midget stand for?

COOPER
Just about everything, Lucy.

Just then: Sheriff Truman's walky-talky shrieks. He answers
it.

TRUMAN
Yeah... Uh-huh... Right away.
(turns it off)
That was Andy. There's a fight at
the morgue.

COOPER
(he knows why)
Albert.

CUT TO:

EXT. THE DOUBLE "R" DINER - DAY

Townsfolk finish breakfast, exit from the diner.

CUT TO:

INT. THE DOUBLE "R" DINER - DAY

NORMA JENNINGS and PAROLE OFFICER WILSON MOONEY occupy a
booth in the back. Mooney sips coffee, notes Norma's good
looks with a roving eye. In mid-conversation:

MOONEY
...in short, your husband has been a
model prisoner, an inspiration to
guard and inmate alike. He greets
the day with a smile and confounds
adversity with a kind word. He's a
credit to his serial number.

Mooney says it with a little come-hither grin. Norma just
stares, takes a drag off her cigarette, ignores him. Mooney
is forced to continue:

MOONEY
Hank's parole hearing is scheduled
for Wednesday. Barring unforeseen
circumstance, with your full support
before the board, he should be
released shortly thereafter. Any
questions?

NORMA
No.

MOONEY
Comments?

NORMA
(biting her tongue)
No.

MOONEY
I'm sure Hank appreciates your
unwavering devotion.
(to file)
Now, I'll need to check some
information. You and Hank have been
married for...

NORMA
Since high school.

MOONEY
There are no children.

NORMA
I can't have any.

MOONEY
How would you characterize your
current relationship?

NORMA
What do you mean, Mr. Mooney?

MOONEY
Are you planning a divorce, Mrs.
Jennings?

NORMA
Not a divorce, no.

Mooney hears the qualification.

MOONEY
Will you help Hank find the job he
needs to effect a successful parole?

NORMA
Yes.

MOONEY
How, exactly

NORMA
I own the Double "R", Mr. Mooney.

A beat. Norma can't stand him and Mooney knows it. Still, he
presses on:

MOONEY
You're quite a girl, Norma. You must
get all kinds of Romeos in here
begging for favors. How do you keep
them from your door?

It's his last attempt. Norma knocks it out of the ballpark:

NORMA
I usually tell them my homicidally
jealous husband is doing three-to-
five for manslaughter but expects to
become a productive member of society
real soon.

MOONEY
(all business)
Well. That should conclude our session
for today.

NORMA
Thank you.

MOONEY
No, no. Thank you, Mrs. Jennings--

Too late. Norma's already out of the booth, stepping back to
the counter. Mooney picks up his file, watches her leave
him.

ANGLE ON COUNTER

A pale and wan SHELLY JOHNSON, newly arrived, sets her purse
beneath the cash register.

NORMA
I didn't expect you till after the
funeral.

SHELLY
I figured you could use some help.

Norma pauses, looks beneath the register. She can SEE Shelly's
purse, slightly open. And she can see a brand new handgun
inside it.

NORMA
(lowers her voice)
Shelly, what're you doing with a gun
in your purse?

SHELLY
Nothin'.

NORMA
"Nothin'." Nobody does "nothin'"
with a gun.

SHELLY
I bought it. It's for protection.
Peace of mind, anyway. You know,
what happened to Laura.

NORMA
You'd be better off hiring a lawyer.

SHELLY
I can't afford one.

NORMA
Well watch yourself. Understand?

Shelly nods, pouts. Norma cases up a little.

NORMA
Careful you don't murder your makeup.

Norma grins, slips off toward hungry customers.

CUT TO:

INT. TWIN PEAKS MORGUE - DAY

SUDDENLY we are inside the Twin Peaks morgue in the midst of
a reeling argument. DOC HAYWARD squares off opposite ALBERT
ROSENFIELD, the impossibly rude pathologist. DEPUTY ANDY
BRENNAN stands to the side, mute, ineffectual. And BEN HORNE
physically separates the two men.

A white partition separates the men from the body of Laura
Palmer.

HAYWARD
I have never in my life met a man
with so little regard for human
frailty. Have you no compassion?!

ALBERT
I've got compassion running out of
my nose, pal. I'm the Sultan of
Sentiment!

Horne pushes them apart. Hayward and Albert pause, red with
fury. Finally:

ALBERT
"Doctor" Hayward--and I use the term
so loosely my gums are flapping--I
have traveled thousands of miles,
and apparently several centuries to
this forgotten sinkhole in order to
perform a series of tests. I do not
ask you to understand them. I am not
a cruel man. I only ask you to get
the hell out of my way so I can finish
my work!!

HAYWARD
We are here to escort Laura Palmer's
body to the cemetery. If you think,
for one minute, that we will leave
here without her, you are out of--

HORNE
All right all right all right. Dr.
Rosenfield. Please. You are not
dealing with the unsophisticated
here.

Albert rolls his eyes so hard they, nearly spin out of the
sockets.

HORNE
(the high road)
Leland Palmer could not be with us
today. I have agreed to appear on
his behalf. And I know I speak for
all of us, the Palmer family included,
when I say that we understand and
appreciate the value of your work.
But, as their representative, I must
insist we consider the feelings of
the Palmer family as well.

Deputy Andy clears his throat, figures he might assist:

ANDY
Dr. Rosenferd, we just got to get
Laura's body to the funeral on time.

Albert glares.

ALBERT
Did you speak?!

Andy wishes he was invisible. Albert turns calmly back to
Horne.

ALBERT
Mr. Horne. I realize that your
position in this fair community pretty
well guarantees venality, insincerity
and a rather irritating method of
expressing yourself. Stupidity,
however, is not a necessarily inherent
trait, so please listen carefully.
You can have a funeral any old time.
Dig hole, plant coffin. I, however,
cannot perform these tests next year,
next month, next week, or tomorrow!
I must perform them now. So please,
why don't you and the rest of the
Bumpkin Brigade return to porch
rockers and resume whittling. I've
got a lot of cutting and pasting to
do--

HAYWARD
That does it. I'm taking charge of
the body, you won't touch Laura again
from this moment on--

Hayward steps toward the partition, Albert grabs him by the
arm.

ALBERT
Nor so fast, Old-Timer--

They square off, ready to fight again. Horne tries pull them
apart. And, just in time, Agent Cooper and Sheriff Truman
step into the morgue, the fray.

COOPER
Gentlemen.

HAYWARD
Harry, thank God--

ALBERT
Cooper, this mindless old fool is
obstructing a criminal investigation.
Cuff him.

HAYWARD
He won't release Laura's body for
the funeral, he's not human.

ALBERT
Certainly has a way with an insult
though.

TRUMAN
Hey that's enough.

ALBERT
Zip it, Squarejaw.
(to Cooper)
I do not suffer fools gladly. Fools
with badges, never. I want no contact
with this hulking boob--

TRUMAN
I've had about enough of your insults.

Albert steps forward, grabs him by the lapels.

ALBERT
Oh yeah? Well I've had about enough
of morons and half-wits, cretins and
congenital idiots, dolts, dunces,
dullards, and dumbbells. And you,
Chowderhead, lummox with badge and
billy club, you, Sheriff Yokel you
blithering hayseed, you have had
enough of me!??

TRUMAN
(calm as ice)
Yes I have.

Truman levels Albert with a single punch to the jaw. Albert
tumbles backward onto his butt. A beat. Albert looks up at
Truman, shocked beyond measure. Cooper intervenes in a flash.
He turns to Truman, orders:

COOPER
Harry, wait in the car.

Truman starts to speak, sees the steel in Cooper's eyes. He
exits without a word.

ALBERT
Oh well. That's nice. How appropriate.
(gets to his feet,
yells after Truman)
The rustic sucker punch. Why not
gunplay? A hail of bullets would be
nice--

COOPER
That's enough. The Sheriff didn't
mean anything.

ALBERT
He hit me.

COOPER
Well. I'm sure he meant to do that.

Albert starts to rail, but Cooper shuts him up with a gesture.

COOPER
Albert, I want the girl's body
released to her family now. I want
to see your test results by noon.
Those are orders.

Albert weighs his options, nods assent, marches off. A tense
beat. Ben Horne clears his throat. Doc Hayward turns to
Cooper.

HAYWARD
Thank you, Agent Cooper.

Cooper nods. Hayward, Horne, and Andy follow Albert out of
the room. A beat. Cooper remains, looks at the white
partition. He steps toward it.

ANGLE ON PARTITION

Agent Cooper pauses for a moment. stares quietly at Laura
Palmer's body. HOLD ON Cooper. The sadness in his eyes.

FADE OUT:

END ACT ONE

ACT TWO

FADE IN:

EXT. LEO JOHNSON'S HOUSE - DAY

Truman and Cooper pull up to the Johnson house, park the
cruiser next to Leo's truck rig. They step out of the cruiser.
Truman stops, deeply troubled about the morgue altercation.

TRUMAN
I can't believe I decked him. It was
out of line, it was unprofessional,
it was probably illegal.

COOPER
Harry, there are many ways to handle
an insult. But sometimes there's
just no substitute for a stiff right
hook.

TRUMAN
Tell me I'm not going to get my butt
kicked by the Bureau.

COOPER
Albert's been hit before. He will be
hit again. You'll get your buttkicked
over my dead body.
(takes a deep breath,
enjoys)
Look at that, there's a duck on the
lake. Fill me in on Leo Johnson.

TRUMAN
Leo's one of those guys you keep on
your list and you keep an eye on,
but we've never caught him with his
hand in the cookie jar.

They turn a corner and come upon LEO JOHNSON, behind the
house, chopping wood. Leo glances at them, continues to chop
wood furiously. They advance.

COOPER
Excuse me. Leo Johnson?

LEO
Who the hell are you?

TRUMAN
This is Special Agent Cooper of the
FBI, Leo. He'd like to ask you a
couple questions.

LEO
So?

TRUMAN
So behave.

Leo stops chopping, glares at Truman. But he just returns
it. Leo mutters, resumes chopping.

LEO
So ask.

COOPER
Leo. Is that short for Leonard?

LEO
That's a question?

COOPER
Did you know Laura Palmer?

LEO
No.

COOPER
How well did you know her?

LEO
I said I didn't.

COOPER
You're lying.

LEO
I knew who she was, all right?
Everybody did.

COOPER
Do you have a criminal record, Leo?

LEO
Nothing. You can look it up.

COOPER
(he already did)
A speeding ticket. April, 1986. A
second moving violation, illegal U-
turn. September, 1988--

LEO
I paid my debt to society.

COOPER
(beat)
Where were you the night of Laura
Palmer's murder? Around midnight.

LEO
(pleased with his
alibi)
On the road. I called my wife Shelly
about that time. From Butte.

COOPER
She'll confirm that?

LEO
She will if you ask her.

Leo suddenly stops chopping, sticks the axe deep into the
wood. He looks at Cooper and Truman, unafraid. Cooper and
Truman look at each other.

CUT TO:

"INVITATION TO LOVE" - "NIGHT"

START CLOSE on a television screen, lush MUSIC over a robin's
egg blue background, the familiar voice intoning:

ANNOUNCER
...and every hour holds the promise
of an... INVITATION TO LOVE...

FADE UP ON insolent tough guy MONTANA in t-shirt and leather
jacket. Luscious EMERALD eyeing him like a cool drink of
water. And ineffectual CHET.

EMERALD
So, Montana, did you find that rainbow
you were looking for?

MONTANA
Lots of rainbows. No pot of gold.

CHET
I'm not sure how I'm feeling about
this.

EMERALD
Chet, get Montana a drink. He must
be thirsty after a year in the rain
forest.

Emerald sashays across the living room, steps lightly into
Montana's arms. She offers him a welcome kiss--a little too
ardently for Chet's liking.

CHET
How long are you planning to stay,
Montana?

Montana looks up from Emerald's beestung lips.

MONTANA
Long enough to see my ex-wife; how
is Jade, Chet?

Chet shivers. The music swells.

CUT TO:

INT. PALMER HOUSE LIVING ROOM - DAY

ANOTHER ANGLE reveals a television in the Palmer house. A
NURSE turns her eyes from the screen, withdraws a syringe
from Leland Palmer's arm. She discards the empty, carefully
draws medication into a second syringe, and places it on a
tray. Just then: the doorbell RINGS.

STAY WITH Leland as the nurse walks to the front door. Leland
watches television.

INTERCUT:

"INVITATION TO LOVE"

JARED, distinguished in smoking jacket and ascot, weeps,
finishes a suicide note addressed to Emerald and Jade. He
takes a gun into his hands, lifts it slowly. Suddenly: someone
knocks at the door, calls to him.

JADE'S VOICE
Daddy! Open up! Daddy it's jade!

Jared pauses, looks at the door, the gun. Music swells.

DURING ABOVE, we HEAR the Palmer's front door open, some
muted exchange, two sets of footsteps returning to the living
room. Finally:

MADELEINE'S VOICE
Uncle Leland?

Leland looks up, sees the Nurse and MADELEINE FERGUSON
standing before him. Madeleine is twenty, quite beautiful,
She wear glasses, has jet black hair worn long. She sets
down a suitcase. A closer angle REVEALS that she looks very
much like Laura Palmer.

Leland stares at Madeleine for a long beat. As if he didn't
recognize her. Then, with great difficulty:

LELAND
Madelaine?
(rises, steps closer,
takes her by the
hands)
Maddy?

MADELEINE
Uncle Leland, I'm so sorry, I...

Madeleine pauses, a sob catches in her throat. She begins to
cry. Leland carefully wipes a tear from her deep blue eyes.
Madeleine looks up at him, whispers:

MADELEINE
Oh Uncle Leland...

Leland takes her into a healing embrace. He's crying too.
HOLD ON them for a beat.

CUT TO:

"INVITATION TO LOVE" - "NIGHT"

Jared holds the gun in his hands, listens to his daughter's
tearful pleading.

JADE
Daddy! Daddy please!

Finally, Jared sets the gun on his desk, steps to the door.
He opens it. And JADE, his beautiful, compassionate, perfect
daughter leaps into his arms. She is Emerald's twin.

JADE
Oh Daddy. I was so afraid. I love
you Daddy.

HOLD on father and daughter for a beat.

CUT TO:

EXT. HAYWARD HOUSE - DAY

Establish.

CUT TO:

INT. HAYWARD HOUSE LIVING ROOM - DAY

Doc Hayward steps into the living room, dressed for the
funeral save for the tie which hangs undone around his neck.
Donna waits for him. She looks at his tie, manages a small
smile.

DONNA
Dad, you're hopeless.

Donna knots her father's tie. She does not speak. Her eyes
are red from crying. Hayward takes a look at his daughter,
consoles:

HAYWARD
Want to talk about it?

DONNA
Oh, Dad, I... I can't believe they're
burying Laura today. It's so... final.
I think and I think and it just
doesn't make sense.

HAYWARD
Death never does.

DONNA
(tearful)
So what are we supposed to do?

HAYWARD
(after a beat)
I live with death and dying every
day. There are times when it's
merciful, almost a relief. But often
it seems nothing but needless and
cruel. It made me furious, for many
years. Furious and helpless. As you
go through life, you learn to accept
it. Because we have to. Even when it
hurts bad enough to break your heart.

DONNA
My heart is breaking. And I don't
know how to stop it.

Donna looks up at her father. Her eyes are bright with tears.
Father and daughter embrace.

CUT TO:

EXT. BRIGGS HOUSE - DAY

Establish.

CUT TO:

INT. BRIGGS DINING ROOM - DAY

BOBBY BRIGGS sits at the dining room table, smoking a
cigarette. Quiet, seemingly downcast. But his eyes are angry
and cold. He wears dark funeral clothes, a tie. Bobby turns,
finds MAJOR BRIGGS standing across the room.

MAJOR BRIGGS
Robert, this may be a good time for
a brief discussion.

BOBBY
You want to talk about cigarettes?
Today?

MAJOR BRIGGS
No. But put it out. It's a filthy
habit, especially for a varsity
athlete.

Bobby grinds out the cigarette in an ashtray. He glowers.
Major Briggs sits next to him, places a hand on Bobby's knee.
He means well, but physical affection does not come naturally
to him. It feels a little forced.

MAJOR BRIGGS
I've attended my share of funerals.
Too many. Any man who dies in war
dies too soon. Laura died too soon
as well.

BOBBY
Yeah. She did.

MAJOR BRIGGS
But we have a responsibility to the
dead, Robert. Responsibility is the
linchpin that binds our society
together. Each man responsible for
his actions, each action contributing
to the greater good.

BOBBY
What's the good of putting somebody
in the ground?

MAJOR BRIGGS
It is man's way of achieving closure.
In ceremony begins understanding,
and the will to carry on without
those we must leave behind. And
Robert, in your life, you must learn,
will learn, to carry on without them.

BOBBY
(whispered)
Great.

MAJOR BRIGGS
I know you experience a certain
reluctance to enter fully into
meaningful exchange. That leads to
stalemate, and a desire on my part
to force certain wisdom upon you.
That's not necessarily a bad thing,
sometimes it is the best course
available.

Briggs pauses, rethinks. Then, a direct emotional statement...

MAJOR BRIGGS
Son. Don't be afraid. We'll all be
there together.

Bobby takes a closer look at his father. These are words he
understands. But they have absolutely nothing to do with the
way he's feeling.

BOBBY
Afraid of what?

MAJOR BRIGGS
The funeral.

BOBBY
I'm not afraid of any damn funeral.
Afraid? I can hardly wait. Afraid?
I'm gonna turn it upside--down.

The anger pours out of him. For once Major Briggs is
speechless. But no matter, just then BETTY BRIGGS steps into
the room, and, with a too bright smile...

BETTY
Everybody ready?

Father and son turn jaundiced eyes her way.

CUT TO:

EXT. TWIN PEAKS POLICE STATION - DAY

Establish.

CUT TO:

INT. POLICE STATION RECEPTION AREA - DAY

Cooper and Sheriff Truman step through the station reception
area. DEPUTY TOMMY THE HAWK appears, keeps pace beside them.

COOPER
Deputy Hawk.

HAWK
Agent Cooper. No sign of the man
with one arm.

COOPER
Keep trying, Deputy. He's out there
somewhere.

Cooper and Truman continue towards the conference room.

TRUMAN
If anyone can find him, Hawk can.

COOPER
Tracker?

TRUMAN
The best.

CUT TO:

INT. INTERROGATION ROOM A - DAY

Cooper and Truman enter. Albert Rosenfield sits at the table,
with a huge file of test results. He refuses to acknowledge
Truman's presence. Not even a glare.

COOPER
Okay, Albert, what've you got?

ALBERT
Enough evidence to save your butt
and get mine out of this godforsaken
berg.

COOPER
We're all ears.

Albert considers hurling an insult, instead tosses a glassine
envelope on the table.

ALBERT
Contents of envelope found in Palmer
diary. Cocaine. Toxicology results
also positive. The little lady had a
habit.
(throws a second
envelope)
Fibers of twine embedded in her wrists
and upper arms. Two different kinds
of twine.
(another envelope)
Fibers of twine found in the railroad
car, a match to the sample from the
wrist. The same twine was used to
bind the wrists of the Pulaski girl.
My conclusion, she was tied up twice
at different locations on the night
of her death. Once here.
(he points to his
wrists)
Once here. Like this.

He gestures to his upper arms, pulls them back into an
uncomfortable position. Like in Cooper's dream.

COOPER
(quietly)
Sometimes my arms bend back.

Truman glances at him, intrigued. Albert reveals another
glassine.

ALBERT
Traces of pumice in standing water
outside the railroad car, suggesting
soap. The kind used for heavy
cleaning. Same pumice particles appear
on the back of Laura's neck. Not her
home-use brand. My conclusion: the
killer washed his hands and leaned
in for a kiss... like this.

He demonstrates. Truman is disturbed by the implication.

TRUMAN
Lord...

Albert shows them a photo.

ALBERT
Distinctive wounds on Laura's
shoulders and neck. Appear to be
claw marks, bites of some kind.

TRUMAN
An animal?

ALBERT
It's trying to think. How quaint.

Cooper silences Albert with a stern look. Albert produces
another envelope.

ALBERT
A small plastic fragment from her
stomach, partially dissolved by
digestive acids. I'm taking it with
me back to the lab for reconstruction,
as the local facilities give new
meaning to the word 'primitive.'
(closes the file with
some fanfare)
Those are the highlights. I'm not
entirely displeased, but a couple
more days with the body and who knows
what I might have come up with--

COOPER
Good work, Albert.

Just then, Deputy Andy enters, dressed in funeral blues.

ANDY
Sheriff. Time to go?

COOPER
Albert, you'll excuse us. We've got
to get to a funeral.

Truman and Andy head out. Cooper moves to follow. But Albert
calls after him:

ALBERT
Cooper? May I have a word with you?
Alone?

Cooper nods to Truman and Andy. They exit. Albert pulls out
a document.

ALBERT
One more item.
(he slides it across
the table)
A report concerning the physical
assault on my person which you
witnessed this morning. I think you'll
find it accurate. It requires your
signature.

Cooper reads through the report with amazing speed. A beat,
then:

COOPER
Albert, I'm not going to sign this--

ALBERT
(shocked)
What?

COOPER
Albert, I hope you can hear this.
I've only been in Twin Peaks a short
time. But in that time, I have seen
decency, honor, and dignity. I have
seen grief to break your heart. Murder
is not a faceless event here. It's
not a statistic to be tallied up at
the end of every day. Laura Palmer's
death has affected each and every
man, woman, and child. Because life
has meaning here. Every life. And
that's a way of living I thought had
vanished from this earth. It hasn't,
Albert. It's right here in Twin Peaks.

ALBERT
Sounds like you've been snacking on
some of the local mushrooms.

Cooper sets the report on the table, carefully pushes it
back to Albert.

COOPER
With your behavior towards these
good people, count yourself lucky I
don't file a report of my own that
could bury you so deep in a building
in Washington you'll never see the
sun.

Albert turns pale, collects his papers, exits without another
word. Cooper looks out the window, produces his miniature
tape recorder, speaks into it.

COOPER
Diane, it's 12:27 PM. I'd like you
to check into my pension plan options
regarding outside real estate
investment. I'm thinking of purchasing
some property at what I assume will
be a very reasonable price.

Cooper stops recording, pauses to ponder.

FADE OUT:

END ACT TWO

ACT THREE

FADE IN:

EXT. BLACK LAKE CEMETERY - DAY

OPEN ON a lovely smalltown cemetery, the usual weathered
headstones. ANOTHER ANGLE reveals Laura Palmer's burial site.
The freshly dug grave. A hydraulic frame used to lower the
casket. And two WORKERS testing the hydraulics, one sitting
on the coffin bed, the other raising and lowering it.

CUT TO:

EXT. BLACK LAKE CEMETERY - DAY

A gleaming hearse in the cemetery parking lot. A mortician
supervises the unloading of Laura's casket, for transfer to
the grave. MUSIC over.

CUT TO:

EXT. ED HURLEY'S HOUSE - DAY

Establish.

CUT TO:

INT. ED HURLEY'S HOUSE - DAY

ED HURLEY steps into the living room wearing an ill-fitting
dark suit. He takes but three strides before Nadine appears
in a flurry, leaps into his arms. She nearly knocks him off
his feet. Ed endures an embrace of lengthy duration, Nadine
snuffling about his ear. Finally, she steps back, beaming,
out of her mind:

NADINE
Love me?

ED
(wildly uncertain)
Why sure, Nadine.

NADINE
How do I look?

Nadine's wearing a faded black dress. Her idea of funeral
clothes. The buttons are incorrectly fastened. Ed looks at
the dress, Nadine's manic smile.

ED
You look fine, Nadine.

NADINE
Last night was wonderful, Ed. You
came back to me. Now we're together
again. Not that we weren't, but now
I feel like we're really together.

Nadine leaps back into his arms. Ed receives her with stunned
expression.

NADINE
At high school, I used to watch Norma
and you at those football games? She
was so pretty. You were such a
handsome couple, but I knew, I always
knew once you got to know me that
we'd be together. Even though I was
just a little nobody, a little brown
mouse, I was always hoping... and
wasn't I right? Wasn't I right?

Nadine pauses, the memories come and go. She looks up at Ed,
back in the moment:

NADINE
Do you remember?

Nadine's mind spins and shifts, it's slowly slipping away.
And Ed doesn't know what the hell to do about it. So he
reaches out to her, carefully redoes the top two buttons on
her dress. Nadine's got them reversed.

ED
(gently)
Sure, Nadine. I remember.

NADINE
(smiles, a blank)
What's that?

Just then: the sound of a motorcycle outside. Not knowing
what else to do, Ed goes to the window.

ED
James.

A beat. James enters. But he's wearing jeans and a leather
jacket. Ed frowns.

ED
You ready? I don't want to be late.

JAMES
I'm not going.

ED
What do you mean you're not going.
It's Laura.

JAMES
I'm not going. I can't.

ED
James--

Too late. James turns and walks out the door. Big Ed makes
no move to follow.

CUT TO:

EXT. GREAT NORTHERN HOTEL - DAY

Establish. A limousine waits our front.

CUT TO:

INT. GREAT NORTHERN CORRIDOR - DAY

Dressed for the funeral, Audrey moves down a corridor in the
hotel residence wing, STOPS to peak into...

INTERCUT:

AUDREY'S POV - INT. BEN HORNE'S OFFICE - DAY

JOHNNIE HORNE sits on the floor, attired in an expensive
suit. DR. LAWRENCE JACOBY kneels at his feet, whispers
urgently to the boy, trying to convince him to remove the
familiar Indian headdress.

Audrey watches from outside the doorway, listens to Jacoby
whisper and cajole. She can see tears glistening in the
doctor's eyes.

CUT TO:

EXT. BLACK LAKE CEMETERY - DAY

A flowered trellis stands at the entrance from the parking
lot to the burial grounds. The LOG LADY arrives wearing a
surprisingly appropriate funeral dress, clutching her log to
her breast. She steps among mourners as they emerge from
automobiles. Cooper, Sheriff Truman, and Deputies Andy and
Hawk get out of the police cruiser, join the throng.

CUT TO:

EXT. BLACK LAKE CEMETERY - DAY

Mourners step through the trellis into the cemetery proper.
Doc Hayward escorts Donna onto the green grass, she pauses,
sees Mike waiting for her nearby.

MIKE
Hi.

DONNA
(to father)
Just a sec.

Donna steps away from her father, walks to Mike. She looks
at him, says nothing. An awkward beat, then:

MIKE
Hey. I'm sorry about the other night.
I didn't mean anything.
(reaches for her, she
pulls away)
Hey, I said I was sorry...

DONNA
I don't want to see you anymore,
Mike. Please don't bother me again.

Mike watches, shellshocked, as she walks away.

CUT TO:

EXT. BLACK LAKE CEMETERY - DAY

Ed escorts Nadine through the cemetery. He sees Donna
returning to her father.

ED
Go on ahead, Nadine. I'll catch up.

Nadine seems uneasy, a little lost.

ED
I promise. It'll be fine.

Nadine nods, reassured, moves off. Ed steps toward Donna,
intercepts.

ED
Hello, Donna.

DONNA
Where's...?

ED
He's not coming. He wouldn't.

DONNA
Why?

Ed can only shrug. Donna sees her father waiting, there's no
rime to talk. She's upset, tries to hide it and walks on.

NORMA'S VOICE
Ed?

Ed turns, finds Norma standing behind him. She's troubled.

NORMA
Hi.

ED
(an uneasy glance
around)
Not the best place to talk.

NORMA
I know. Hank's parole hearing is
tomorrow. He could be out next week.
Maybe sooner.

Ed nods. He doesn't want to talk about it here. She sees
Nadine standing nearby and realizes why.

NORMA
(not catty)
Nadine looks nice.

ED
Yeah. She's feeling good today.

There's sympathy in his voice, sadness too. Norma understands.
Ed manages a smile and moves off.

CUT TO:

EXT. BLACK LAKE CEMETERY - DAY

Lastly, Ben Horne escorts Leland and SARAH PALMER into the
cemetery. Mourners stop and stare. Sarah squints in the
sunlight, clutches Leland's hand. And Madeleine Ferguson
walks behind them, wearing dark glasses.

Ben spots Catherine nearby. He nods to Madeleine, allows her
to escort Leland and Sarah ahead. Ben remains, waits for
Catherine to join him.

CATHERINE
(as they walk, aside)
Taking care of the Palmers, are we?

BEN
It's the only decent thing to do.

CATHERINE
Had to shut down the mill again. All
that grief. 'Few more tragedies it'll
roll over and play dead.

BEN
See you at the funeral.

Ben and Catherine separate, poker-faced.

CUT TO:

EXT. LAURA'S GRAVESITE - DAY

Mourners gather around the grave. Laura's burnished casket
sits on its hydraulic bed, the dark hole beneath it. And
FATHER CLARENCE prepares his oration. Father Clarence is an
old man, red-faced; he fumbles with a number of prayer books
and hymnals. This is no ordinary service for him. He is as
deeply saddened as those who wait for him to comfort them.

FATHER CLARENCE
I am the resurrection and the life,
saith the Lord; he that believeth in
me, though he were dead, yet shall
he live; and whosoever liveth and
believeth in me shall never die.

In the distance, a lone figure steps through headstones toward
the grave. James Hurley. He walks closer, eyes locked on
Laura's casket. Bobby sees him coming, darkens, scowls. Donna
sees James too. She finds Bobby in the throng, notes his
fury. And so begins, as Father Clarence continues, a CHAIN
OF GLANCES.

CLARENCE'S VOICE
For none of us liveth to himself,
and no man dieth to himself. For if
we live, we live unto the Lord; and
if we die, we die unto the Lord.

Donna looks to Sheriff Truman for help.

But Sheriff Truman is looking at Josie.

Josie meets his gaze. Then looks away, as if too shy to stare
at him here.

Josie turns to Pete Martell. Pete nods, ever sociable.

CLARENCE'S VOICE
(over glances)
Whether we live, therefore, or die,
we are the Lord's. Blessed are the
dead who die in the Lord; even so
saith the Spirit, for they rest from
their labors. The Lord be with you...

ALL
And with thy spirit.

CLARENCE'S VOICE
Let us pray.

Pete turns from Josie, looks to his wife.

But Catherine is leering at Ben Horne.

Ben returns her gaze, but is jostled by Bobby shoving past
him toward the grave.

CLARENCE'S VOICE
0 God, entrust this child Laura to
thy never-failing care and love, and
bring us all to thy heavenly kingdom;
through the same thy Son Jesus Christ
our Lord, who liveth and reigneth
with thee and the Holy Spirit, one
God, now and forever. Amen.

Father Clarence clears his throat. But before he can continue,
Johnny Home brays out a rather ill-timed:

JOHNNY
Amen!

FATHER CLARENCE
Thank you, Johnny.

THE CHAIN OF GLANCES CONTINUES:

Shelly spots Bobby, sees his anger, follows his stare to
James.

James is looking at Donna, seeking comfort, approval.

But Donna, having witnessed Bobby's fury, now looks to Big
Ed for help.

CLARENCE'S VOICE
I baptized Laura Palmer. I instructed
her in Sunday school. And like all
of you, I came to love her with that
special love we reserve for the
headstrong and bold. Laura was bright,
beautiful, charming. But most of all
she was, I think, impatient. Impatient
for her life to begin, for the rest
of the world to catch up with her
many dreams and ambitions.

Big Ed doesn't notice Donna's distress. He's busy trying to
get Norma's attention.

Norma doesn't see him. She's looking at Nadine.

Nadine, oblivious as always, is gazing intently at Leland
and Sarah Palmer, Madeleine beside them. Nadine wipes tears
from her eye.

CLARENCE'S VOICE
If we appear to put those dreams to
rest today, do not believe it. For
those of us who loved her, those
dreams will never die. They live on
inside each of us.

JOHNNY'S VOICE
(as ill-timed as before)
Amen!

Madeleine looks up, sees Nadine peering at her from across
the grave.

Madeleine looks away, only to find Audrey staring at her
from the other side.

Audrey notes the resemblance to Laura, reacts.

Audrey looks to find Agent Cooper in the throng, she wants
him to see it too.

And as for Cooper, he's been watching this chain from the
start, fascinated by all the connections and clues it offers
him.

Suddenly Cooper frowns. He sees Bobby Briggs plowing through
the crowd, stepping quickly toward Father Clarence, the grave.

CLARENCE'S VOICE
Laura used to tell me that I talked
too much. I won't make that mistake
here. It is enough to say that I
loved her, and will miss her for the
rest of my days.

JOHNNYS VOICE
(getting into his own
call and response
rhythm)
Amen!!

Bobby steps to the front of the gravesite, nearly howls the
repetition:

BOBBY
AMEN!!!

Everything stops. Bobby confronts the grave and the gathered
mourners with grief and rage.

BOBBY
What are you looking at? What are
you waiting for? You make me sick.
You damn hypocrites make me sick.
Everybody knew she was in trouble.
But we didn't do a thing. Who killed
the Prom Queen?! You did. We all
did. And pretty words won't bring
her back. Keep your prayers. Laura
doesn't need them. She would've
laughed at them anyway

Bobby's cracking up, tears pool in his eyes. James moves to
stop him. Mike hurries forward, ready to fight. Bobby sees
James approaching, he leaps in his direction.

But Cooper gets there first, Truman, Andy, and Hawk close
behind. They pull the boys apart, stop the fight before it
happens. Amidst the shouting and commotion, Johnny Horne
lifts his head toward the sky, lets out an atavistic howl:

JOHNNY
Ahoooooooooooh!!

Audrey rushes to comfort him. The howl, the brawl, all
contribute to a growing sense of chaos, trouble and grief in
the air. Major Briggs grabs his son and drags him away from
the grave as Bobby screams at James:

BOBBY
I'll get you! You're dead! I'll get
you!

And now, unnoticed for the moment, Leland Palmer lets go of
his wife's hand, steps quietly toward the casket. He stares
at it for a long beat, the tumult erupting all around him.
Then, quite suddenly, without warning...

Leland Palmer leaps onto the casket, shouting and wailing...

LELAND
Laura! Laura!

Gasps of shock. Truman and Cooper step forward immediately,
but Leland's jump has activated the hydraulics, the casket
begins to sink from view. A CARETAKER frantically reverses
the controls, brings Leland and the casket up again. But
just as Truman and Cooper seem about to grab him, the casket
begins to descend, remains beyond their grasp.

LELAND
Laura! My baby!

And so it goes, the casket rising and falling, Truman and
Cooper now enlisting the deputies to form a human chain, the
mourners reacting with shock and dismay.

And now, at long last, Sarah Palmer takes tentative steps
forward, her eyes seem to clear, and she shouts, roars at
her husband:

SARAH
DON'T RUIN THIS TOO!!

A sudden silence descends upon the gravesite. Sarah Palmer
remains frozen, Madeleine at her side. Mourners glance at
each other, begin to disperse. The funeral of Laura Palmer
has concluded.

FADE OUT:

END ACT THREE

ACT FOUR

FADE IN:

EXT. DOUBLE R DINER - NIGHT

Nightfall at the Double R.

CUT TO:

INT. DOUBLE R DINER - NIGHT

OPEN ON a pair of hands, female, acting out a pantomime on
the Double R counter. One hand, palm down, held out straight,
suggests a coffin/platform. The other, two fingers pointed
down, skips across the counter, suggesting leaping feet. In
this manner, accompanied by buzzing lips approximating the
sound of hydraulics, Shelly Johnson reenacts the funeral
imbroglio. Her fingers skip across the counter, leap upon
the coffin, and BZZZZZ, the hydraulics go up and down and up
and down...

ANOTHER ANGLE reveals Shelly in the Double R. She's
entertaining several old coots at the counter, demonstrating
Leland Palmer's leap onto the casket--and into local lore.
Norma passes by, frowns.

Shelly puts her hands behind her back as if to promise no
more finger puppets. But the moment Norma moves on, she's at
it again, fingers flying, lips buzzing, much to the delight
of the crusty old regulars.

CUT TO:

INT. DOUBLE R DINER - NIGHT

Sheriff Truman, Big Ed Hurley, and Deputy Hawk share a booth
in the back, drinking coffee and eating pie. They speak just
above a whisper. They're trading secrets, not funeral gossip.
In mid-conversation:

TRUMAN
Maybe we should tell him.

HAWK
Why?

TRUMAN
I feel bad keeping him in the dark.
What the hell, he's going to figure
it our sooner or later anyway.

ED
Don't be so sure.

TRUMAN
(looking over Ed's
shoulder)
Want to bet?

Truman SEES Cooper enter the diner, step toward their booth.

TRUMAN
Right on time.

ED
(sotto voce)
Careful who you trust, Harry. He's
not one of us.

COOPER
Evening, Harry. Ed, Hawk.

Truman gestures to the space beside him. Cooper sits down.

COOPER
I got your note. What's up?

Ed signals to Norma, she steps over to take Cooper's order.

TRUMAN
Agent Cooper, how would you like
some fresh huckleberry pie?

COOPER
I would love some huckleberry pie.
(for Norma's benefit)
Heated. Vanilla ice cream on the
side. Coffee.

NORMA
Coming right up.

Norma steps away. Cooper turns to Ed.

COOPER
How long have you been in love with
Norma?

Ed blanches, says nothing. Truman turns to him.

TRUMAN
See what I mean?

Ed nods. Cooper takes note of the exchange, looks to Hawk,
Sheriff Truman.

COOPER
There's something you fellas want to
tell me.

ED
(a convert)
Better tell him.

Hawk nods assent. A beat. Sheriff Truman begins:

TRUMAN
Someone's running drugs into Twin
Peaks from over the border. We've
been working undercover, trying to
set up a bust: top to bottom. Nobody
walks.

COOPER
Who's targeted?

TRUMAN
Jacques Renault, bartender at the
Roadhouse, we figure him for the
middleman. Ed was staking him out
the night you got into town. Renault
slipped something into his drink.

ED
Felt like somebody hit me on the
head with a hammer.

COOPER
I didn't know you were a deputy, Ed.

TRUMAN
He's not.

COOPER
A little outside your jurisdiction,
isn't it?

ED
Somebody's sellin' drugs to high
school kids. That's in everybody's
jurisdiction.

TRUMAN
I call on Ed when I need him. He's
not the only one I call.

Just then: Norma arrives with Cooper's pie and coffee.

TRUMAN
Thank you, Norma.

NORMA
Enjoy.

Cooper digs in, gives Norma a hearty thumbs-up. Norma smiles,
walks away.

COOPER
This must be where pies go when they
die.

Cooper takes another bite. Sheriff Truman waits for some
reaction to all he's told him. Finally, Cooper sets down his
fork, begins:

COOPER
Someone's bringing, drugs into Twin
Peaks. Laura Palmer was on drugs.
You call on Ed to help you out. Ed's
a good man. Local bartender's a mid-
level player, okay, it's hard to get
by on minimum wage. Now Harry, please.
What is it you really want to tell
me?

Sheriff Truman looks at the others. They encourage him to
continue

TRUMAN
You're going to have to trust me. No
matter how it sounds.

COOPER
I trust you, Harry.

TRUMAN
(after a beat, looking
for words)
Twin Peaks is different. A long way
from the world. You've noticed that.

COOPER
Indeed I have.

TRUMAN
And that's the way we like it. But
there's a back end to that that's
different too. Maybe that's the price
we pay for all the good things.

COOPER
What is it?

TRUMAN
(lowering his voice)
There's a sort of evil out there.
Something strange in the hills. It
takes different forms, but it's been
there for as long as anyone can
remember. And we've always been here
to fight it.

COOPER
"We?"

TRUMAN
Men before us. Men before them. More
after we're gone. We protect our
own. We have to.

COOPER
(relishing this)
A secret society.

The others exchange looks.

TRUMAN
Let's take Agent Cooper for a little
ride.

COOPER
Where to?

TRUMAN
The Book House.

CUT TO:

EXT. THE ROADHOUSE - NIGHT

A dusty parking lot surrounds the slightly seedy honky tonk.
Behind it, another, smaller structure. The Book House. Sheriff
Truman and the others arrive in a cruiser and a patrol car,
exit. Cooper takes a deep breath of cool night air.

TRUMAN
This way.

Truman leads Cooper towards the Book House.

COOPER
How long have you been Sheriff, Harry?

TRUMAN
Five years.

COOPER
How long have you been meeting here?

TRUMAN
Longer than that.
(they, reach the door)
It's a funny thing. Seems like every
time you solve a mystery, there's
another one right behind it.

Cooper smiles. He can appreciate that sort of thinking.

CUT TO:

INT. BOOK HOUSE NIGHT

They enter. It is a clubhouse of sorts, chairs and tables, a
comfortable atmosphere. And walls lined with bookshelves,
tomes on every imaginable topic. Cooper stops, reacts. There's
a burly hirsute MAN, wearing a gag, tied to a chair at the
center of the room. James Hurley and JOEY PAULSON stand guard.

TRUMAN
You know James. Joey Paulson.

JAMES
Hello, Agent Cooper.

COOPER
Hello, James. Joey. Who's this?

TRUMAN
Bernard Renault. Jacques' brother.
Janitor had at the roadhouse. Bernard
had an ounce of cocaine in his kit
bag. Thought we'd ask him a couple
questions.

Cooper nods, getting into the spirit. Truman removes Bernard's
gag.

COOPER
(after a beat)
Did you ever sell drugs to Laura
Palmer?

BERNARD
(French-Canadian)
I don't sell drugs.

TRUMAN
How much does Jacques pay you to be
the mule?

BERNARD
Jacques don't pay me nothing, I'm no
mule.

TRUMAN
So that ounce we found, that was for
personal use?

BERNARD
That's right.

TRUMAN
Where's your brother been? Not at
work the last few days.

BERNARD
I don't know. He got business.

COOPER
With who?

BERNARD
I don't know.

TRUMAN
Who else does Jacques work with?

BERNARD
Why don't you ask him yourself? He
be back tonight. Any minute.

TRUMAN
He's coming to work?

BERNARD
(stating the obvious)
He the bartender, isn't he?

Bernard grins, triumphant. Cooper looks at Truman, steps
closer.

COOPER
Bernard, we have you tied up in a
chair. You're mixed up in a wide
variety of felonies with your brother.
What I want to know is, why in the
world would you tell us when and
where to find him?

That wipes the grin off his face. Bernard looks at his feet,
says nothing. Cooper doesn't mind. He already knows the
answer.

CUT TO:

EXT. COUNTRY ROAD - NIGHT

JACQUES RENAULT walks down a country road, peers through the
dark at the Roadhouse in the distance. Jacques stops suddenly,
reacts.

JACQUES' POV - THE ROADHOUSE

There's a redlight on top of the honky-tonk, it shines and
blinks a warning. Jacques takes one look at it, knows what
it means. He turns and runs as fast as he can in the opposite
direction.

CUT TO:

INT. LEO JOHNSON'S HOUSE - NIGHT

Leo stands over the kitchen sink, carefully cleans and
polishes a pair of heavy boots. The phone rings. Leo sets
the boots on a towel, answers it.

LEO
Yeah?

INTERCUT:

EXT. PHONE BOOTH - NIGHT

Jacques is calling from a phone booth, breathless, sweating
from the run.

JACQUES
The bust light's on. Bernard's in
trouble.

LEO
You sure?

JACQUES
I saw it. You gotta get me out of
here, Leo. Border run.

LEO
Where are you?

JACQUES
Phone booth by the Cash and Carry. I
don't like waitin', man.

LEO
Shut up. I'm on my way.

Leo hangs up, grabs his jacket and a small bag. Shelly enters,
wonders.

SHELLY
Where you goin'?

LEO
You don't need to know.

He exits. Shelly grabs her purse, kneels down in the kitchen
near a cabinet. Without hesitation--she's done this before--
Shelly carefully removes some of the cabinet's slats,
revealing a hiding place. She reaches into the hole, pulls
out Leo's bloody shirt. Satisfied, she returns it, then digs
into her purse, removes her brand new Colt .32, looks at it
for a beat. Then puts it with the shirt below and replaces
the slats.

CUT TO:

EXT. ROADHOUSE - NIGHT

Cooper, Truman, Ed, and Hawk exit, Truman heads for his
cruiser, gets on the radio.

TRUMAN
(to Cooper)
You and Hawk wait inside the
Roadhouse. Ed and I'll watch the
road, I'll call for some back-up.

COOPER
Jacques' half-way to the border by
now.

TRUMAN
We don't know that yet.

Cooper directs their attention to the blinking red light on
top of the Roadhouse.

COOPER
I don't remember seeing that blinking
red light before, do you?

The others look up. Truman realizes what's up. Hangs up his
radio.

TRUMAN
I'll take Bernard in and book him.

ED
I'll give you a hand, Harry.

TRUMAN
Hawk, why don't you run Agent Cooper
back to the Great Northern?

COOPER
(as they start off)
Buy you a drink, Hawk?

Hawk nods.

DISSOLVE TO:

INT. GREAT NORTHERN BAR - NIGHT

A short time later. A sad song plays on a jukebox. Couples
gather on the small dance floor, a few GUESTS mingle at the
bar. Cooper and Hawk sit at small table near the fireplace.
Their mood is quiet, contemplative. It's been a long day.

COOPER
(after a beat)
Did you know her, Hawk?

HAWK
Laura? Caught her speeding a couple
times. Let her talk me our of the
ticket. That wasn't hard.

COOPER
Laura Palmer didn't have to die.
It's wrong. It makes me mad.

HAWK
Everything dies.

A beat. Cooper takes a pull from a longneck beer. He quietly
wonders:

COOPER
Do you believe in the soul?

The question takes Hawk by surprise. He takes a closer look
at Cooper.

HAWK
Several.

COOPER
(curious)
More than one?

HAWK
Blackfeet legend. Waking souls that
give life to mind and body. A dream
soul that wanders.

COOPER
Where does it wander?

HAWK
Faraway places. The Land of the Dead.

COOPER
Is that where Laura is?

HAWK
Laura's in the ground, Agent Cooper.
That's all I know for sure.

Cooper reacts, takes a closer look. Tommy 'The Hawk' Hill,
agnostic Blackfoot. There's more to him than meets the eye.
A beat. Cooper lifts his glass into the air, proposes a toast:

COOPER
To Laura. Godspeed.

They touch glasses, toast. That's when Cooper sees Leland
Palmer stepping between tables to the dance floor.

ON LELAND

Leland walks onto the dance floor, stands quite still. The
juke selects another title. Big band music pours into the
room. Leland listens intently. He looks up, his eyes bright
with tears. A beat. Leland Palmer begins to dance.

At first his actions go unnoticed. But gradually couples
turn to regard him, this sad man dancing across the floor.
Some giggle, others look with sympathy. Most begin to
disperse. But Leland keeps dancing, he pleads With those who
remain:

LELAND
Dance with me. Please. Dance with
me.

As his pleadings grows more desperate, Cooper and Hawk step
quickly to the dance floor, mean to lead him away.

COOPER
Mr. Palmer. Leland?

HAWK
Mr. Palmer?

Gradually, Leland hears them, finally focusing on them.

COOPER
It's time to go home.

Pause. He nods weakly, Cooper and Hawk gently lead Leland
between them out of the room.

DISSOLVE TO:

EXT. BLUE PINE LODGE - NIGHT.

Establish. A full moon sailing overhead.

CUT TO:

INT. BLUE PINE LODGE KITCHEN - NIGHT

Lights are low, a small table has been set with silver,
candies, and white linen. A romantic supper for two. Josie
wears a silk robe, something sheer beneath it. Sheriff Truman
wears the ardent expression of a man in love.

Pete steps into view carrying dinner on a large platter.

PETE
Pan-fried Rainbow. Caught 'em this
morning.

Pete serves the trout to each.

JOSIE
Thank you, Pete.

PETE
It's nothing. Old family recipe.

Truman pours a little wine, offers:

TRUMAN
Pour you a glass, Pete?

PETE
No, no. You kids enjoy. Never mind
the dishes. We'll get 'em later.

He intends to leave them alone. Truman smiles appreciatively,
thanks Pete with a wink. He watches Pete step from the room.
A beat. Josie toys with her food, silent, preoccupied.
Something is troubling her. And Truman knows it.

TRUMAN
Heart a' gold, old Pete.

JOSIE
Yes, he is.

TRUMAN
Josie, what's wrong?

JOSIE
Nothing.

TRUMAN
'Nothing.'

Josie looks up from her dinner. Candlelight shimmers all
around her.

TRUMAN
God you're beautiful.

Josie tries to smile. But her eyes are full of fear. Truman
leans closer.

TRUMAN
Josie something's wrong, I want you
to tell me.

JOSIE
(after a beat)
They want to hurt me. I know they
do. Something horrible is going to
happen, Harry.

TRUMAN
Who? Who's going to hurt you?

JOSIE
Ben and Catherine.

CAMERA MOVES from the table, finally REVEALS an intercom
speaker on the wall, nearly out of sight, a silent ear
listening.

CUT TO:

INT. MARTELL BEDROOM - NIGHT

Catherine Martell sits at a small desk, car pressed close to
an intercom console/speaker. She manipulates the volume knob,
listening to every word they say.

JOSIE'S VOICE
Catherine keeps the mill account
books in her safe. Two books. Two
accounts.

TRUMAN'S VOICE
(alert)
Two? Can you show me?

CUT TO:

INT. BLUE PINE LODGE OFFICE - NIGHT

Josie leads Truman into the office, trips the hidden catch,
releases the false bookshelf, and reveals the wall safe. She
inserts the key, tugs at the handle.

JOSIE
Why would she keep two sets of books?

TRUMAN
The usual reasons would have something
to do with stealing. Maybe more.

Josie opens the safe, both look inside, react. There is only
one ledger inside.

JOSIE
But there were two.

Truman removes the ledger, thumbs through it.

TRUMAN
Nothing unusual here.

JOSIE
(whispered, trembling)
There were two.

CUT TO:

INT. MARTELL BEDROOM - NIGHT

Catherine smiles. She's holding the other ledger in her hand.
Just then: footsteps, Pete enters. She slips the ledger in a
drawer and turns down the intercom. Pete catches this last
action.

PETE
(all innocence)
Have you seen my tackle box?

CATHERINE
The next time you and the merry widow
want a peek in my safe, don't go to
so much trouble. Be a man about it,
Pete. Ask me to my face.

Pete stares at her for a beat. He'll fight another day.

PETE
Maybe I'll check the truck.

Pete exits. Catherine gloats.

CUT TO:

INT. BLUE PINE LODGE KITCHEN - NIGHT

Truman and Josie sit before the wood-burning stove. Josie
burrows into Truman's arms, shivers, speaks just above a
whisper, revealing her deepest fears:

JOSIE
When Andrew died I was so alone. I
couldn't think, I didn't know what
to do. Catherine said she would help
me. And Ben would help me too.

TRUMAN
(figuring)
Ben and Catherine...

JOSIE
They lied to me. They didn't care
about Andrew. They didn't care about
me. All they want is to take the
mill away from me.
(beat)
I have never said this before to
anyone. Harry, I believe Andrew's
death was not an accident. And I
believe they will try to kill me
too.

A tear runs from her eye. Truman pulls her closer, trying to
make some sense of this.

TRUMAN
Josie, Josie. Nothing's going to
happen to you. Not now, not ever.
I'll make damn sure of that.

JOSIE
Oh, Harry.

Truman kisses her gently. Josie sighs, returns his kiss with
greater fervor. They settle into a long embrace, whisper
between kisses.

TRUMAN
You don't have to be afraid.

Josie places her head against his chest, holds on tight.

TRUMAN
(softly continues)
Days like today, death feels like
the biggest thing in the world. But
it's not, Josie. Nor for us.

JOSIE
I'm not afraid of death. I'm afraid
of losing you.

A beat. Josie begins to recite while trembling in his arms:

JOSIE
All things howsoever they flourish
Return to the root from which they
grew. This return to the root is
called Quietness; Quietness is called
submission to Fate; What has submitted
to Fate has become part of the always-
so. To know the always-so is to be
Illumined; Not to know it, means to
go blindly to disaster.
(beat)
He who knows the always-so has room
in him for everything; He who has
room in him for everything is without
prejudice. To be without prejudice
is to be kingly; To be kingly is to
be of heaven; To be of heaven is to
be in Tao. Tao is forever and he
that posssess it, Though his body
ceases, is not destroyed.

HOLD ON Josie for a beat. Safe in Truman's arms.

CUT TO:

EXT. BLACK LAKE CEMETERY - NIGHT

Cooper stands watch at the cemetery, a night wind howling
about him. He peers into the dark, Laura's grave in the
distance. The Land of the Dead. A beat, then:

CARETAKER'S VOICE
Can you hear 'em?

Cooper turns to find an old CARETAKER at his side, gazing
out into the night.

CARETAKER
It's the metal and the wood, I guess.
Some caskets, you stick 'em in the
ground, and the wood starts to expand,
starts to rub against that metal.
And if it rubs just so, you get a
strange sort of sound. If the night's
just right, and the wood--teak and
brass are the best--well, it's like
music. You can almost hear the caskets
singin'.

Needless to say, it's a notion Cooper finds fascinating.

DISSOLVE TO:

EXT. BLACK LAKE CEMETERY - NIGHT

Minutes later. CAMERA STARTS AT GROUND LEVEL, green grass,
dark graves. Suddenly Cooper LOWERS INTO FRAME, presses his
ear to the ground. As if to listen for the casket's singing.
That's when he hears another sound. Footsteps, someone walking
toward Laura Palmer's grave.

Cooper slips into the shadows. He watches a lone figure step
to Laura's grave. But he can't make out the face. At least
until the mystery man lights a cigarette.

COOPER'S POV

It is Dr. Lawrence Jacoby. He inhales deeply, stares down at
Laura's grave. He holds a bouquet of flowers in his free
hand.

CUT TO:

EXT. BLACK LAKE CEMETERY - NIGHT

Jacoby sets the flowers by the headstone. Cooper steps into
view, speaks gently.

COOPER
Dr. Jacoby?
(silence)
I didn't see you at the funeral.

A long beat. Jacoby finally turns to Cooper, seems to notice
him for the first time. Then, eyes bright with tears, he
whispers:

JACOBY
I'm a terrible person, Agent Cooper.
I pretend that I'm not. But I am.

Cooper says nothing. He'll let the man talk.

JACOBY
I listen to their problems all day.
I give them advice, solutions that
are supposed to "improve" their lives.
These people think of me as a friend.
(beat)
But the truth is, I... I don't really
care. When I'm not working I wear
ear plugs so I don't have to hear
them talk. Nothing... ever... touches
me.
(beat)
Except for Laura.
(beat)
I couldn't come today. I just
couldn't.
(a whisper)
I hope she'll understand...

HOLD ON them for a beat. Jacoby's sad tears in the dark.

FADE OUT:

THE END

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