"In writing fiction, the more fantastic the tale, the plainer the prose should be. Don't ask your readers to admire your words when you want them to believe your story." - Ben Bova [ more quotes ]

"FIVE EASY PIECES"

by

Carole Eastman and Bob Rafelson



TITLE SEQUENCE:

The Bach-Vivaldi A-Minor Concerto for Four Pianos PLAYS OVER
a series of family album photographs. Written in careful
penmanship beneath each are names identifying family members:

1ST PHOTO: A man stands in front of the raised sounding board
of a piano, playing the viola.

Seated on the piano bench, accompanying him, is a woman in a
maternity dress:

"Isabelle and Nicholas"

2ND PHOTO: A boy of 11, wearing conductor's tails and holding
a raised baton in his right hand as if about to gesture a
downbeat:

"Herbert Kreutzer Dupea"

3RD PHOTO: Another boy of approximately 9, in the act of
playing the violin:

"Carl Fidelio Dupea"

4TH PHOTO: The two boys are now poised behind the piano.
Seated on its bench is a girl of 6, her hands resting on the
keyboard. Written beneath:

"Elizabeth Partita Dupea"

5TH PHOTO: The above family group, seated on the porch of
the Dupea home. All eyes but Isabelle's are faced toward the
camera. She beams upon a 3 year-old asleep in her arms, his
head resting against her bosom. His figure is encircled by
the pen's marking and preceding his name is the configuration
of a small heart:

"Robert Eroica Dupea"

INT. MUSIC ROOM - DUPEA HOME - DAY

BACH-VIVALDI OVER:

A 7-year-old BOBBY sits in a chair, his feet dangling in
absent-minded rhythm to a chamber piece played by his father,
his two brothers and his sister.

CLOSE ON a metronome, marking a slow etude rhythm.

The CAMERA MOVES from it to Bobby, on the piano bench beside
his mother. As she patiently demonstrates the etude for him,
he places a thumb in his mouth and leans against her arm.

ON THE METRONOME at an andante rhythm. CARL and TITA, now in
their teens, are seated side by side on the piano bench,
playing four-hands with dazzling virtuosity.

The CAMERA MOVES from them to a framed newspaper article on
the music-room wall. Below a photograph of a 20-year-old
young man are the words: "Herbert Kreutzer Dupea - Seattle's
Youngest Guest Conductor."

INT. RECITAL HALL GREEN ROOM - NIGHT

BACH-VIVALDI OVER:

Bobby, at 10, wearing a dress suit. His mother combs his
hair with maternal concentration.

CLOSE-UP of a program announcing a Dupea family recital. The
CAMERA SCANS down the bill, over:

Sonata in C Major for Two Violins - Bach - Played by Nicholas
and Carl Dupea.

Like As a Lovelorn Turtle - Hendel - Sung by Isabelle Dupea.

Rondo Alla Turca - Mozart - Played by Elizabeth Dupea.

Piano Sonata, Opus 110 - Beethoven - Played by Herbart Dupea.

THE CAMERA COMES TO REST ON:

Five Easy Pieces - Grebner - Played by Robert Dupea.

INT. MORTUARY CHAPEL - DAY

Five Easy Pieces, played haltingly OVER the torsos of a line
of people moving slowly down the chapel aisle.

ANOTHER ANGLE

shows a solemn procession of the above, filing by an open
casket holding Isabelle Dupea.

ON THE FAMILY PEW

The CAMERA PANS from NICHOLAS, seated on the aisle, to the
four adult children seated next to him and COMES TO REST on
Bobby. His gaze is cast down to his lap, as he refuses to
look at:

The pale profile of his mother's face resting within the
satin folds of the casket lining, and...

...as the last of the "family friends" pay their respect:
Nicholas steps out into the aisle and, followed by Tita,
Carl and HERBERT, moves down toward the casket.

Bobby rises from his seat and makes his way toward the aisle,
where he hesitates briefly, then turns and walks up the aisle
and out the chapel doors.

TITLES END

EXT. SIGNAL HILL OIL FIELD - DAY

TAMMY WYNETTE'S "STAND BY YOUR MAN" OVER:

The toothed bucket of a back hoe trenches into the earth,
then lifts up into the air, revealing Bobby in hard-hat and
heavy gloves, operating the levers. As the hoe swings off to
the side and deposits a load of earth into the rear of a
truck...

...a SERIES OF SHOTS begins, showing Bobby and a fellow hard-
hat (ELTON) engaged in the dirty and dangerous task of working
"crew" with a team of TOOL-PUSHERS on the derricks of Signal
Hill.

Functioning as servants of the well and its pumps, the PULL
rods, MAKE and BREAK joints on the rig floor, WELD tubing,
CARRY pipes, CLIMB the "tour," and PLAY THE DOZENS on beer
wagon breaks.

INT. BOBBY'S CAR - SIGNAL HILL - NIGHT

ABOVE SONG OVER:

Bobby, still in his hard hat, as he drives. Out through the
window, the derricks of the Hill can be seen, their night-
work lights on.

EXT. BOBBY'S CAR - NIGHT

SONG OVER:

FOLLOWING ON the car as it moves off the Hill into the seamy
districts adjacent to it, passing by fast food joints, liquor
stores, all-night porno parlors and neon-lighted bars.

INT. BOBBY'S CAR - NIGHT

SONG OVER:

ON BOBBY'S FACE:

as he stares out through the windshield, his eyes distant,
dwelling in an oblivion that blanks both the present and
past.

EXT. BOBBY'S CAR - NIGHT

SONG OVER:

The car pulls onto a low-rent residential street and comes
to a stop in front of a small bungalow.

Bobby exits the car, moves up the walkway to the house and
disappears inside.

INT. RAYETTE'S LIVING ROOM - NIGHT

SONG OVER:

Bobby, seated on the couch, a can of beer in hand, staring
morosely across the room, to:

A PORTABLE STEREO,

Playing the song:

WYNETTE (V.O.)
"And if you love him/Oh be proud of
him/For after all, he's just a man..."

RAYETTE DIPESTO,

in a waitress's uniform with a bowl of beer nuts.

After placing them on the coffee table in front of him, she
leans down and kisses him. Challenged by a less than
reciprocal response, she kisses him more fervently. As she
moves her lips from his ear to his neck, he lifts the can to
his mouth and drinks.

WYNETTE (V.O.)
"Stand by your man/And show the world
you love him/Keep giving all the
love you can/Stand by your man."

The song concludes, and setting aside her ardor for the
moment:

RAYETTE
(Arky accent)
I'm gonna play it again...

As she starts for the stereo, he takes hold of her hand.

BOBBY
You're not going to play it again.

RAYETTE
Well, lemme play the other side then.

BOBBY
No.

Again, he prevents her from moving to the stereo and pulls
her down onto the couch.

RAYETTE
Now quit, Bobby. You said you're
goin' a help me pick a song.

BOBBY
You said.

RAYETTE
Well, lemme sing the one I picked
an' see what you think...
(she sings)
"When there's a fire in your
heart/Break the glass/Sound the
alarm..."

He picks up one of the couch pillows and holds it over his
ear.

RAYETTE
Oh, you prick...

She pulls it from his hand.

RAYETTE
How 'bout if I just cut off your
damn water?

BOBBY
I'm too moved by your gentility to
speak.

She immediately softens and tries to become more "refined."

RAYETTE
Sugar, you know how I feel about
you, don't you? I'm just tryin' to
get you to take an interest in my
kind a things, an' what I'm tryin'
to do with myself...
(bringing her face
close to his)
You know, there id'n anything in the
world I wouldn't do for you, baby. I
started livin' the day I found you,
you know that?

BOBBY
You're playing the other side.

Very hurt, she sits up and looks away from him. He finishes
the beer and holds the can out to her.

BOBBY
Cerveza.

RAYETTE
(grabbing it from him)
Serveza yourself!

BOBBY
Now, now.

RAYETTE
(she stands up)
No, dammit, I would easy.

And, as she turns and goes toward the kitchen:

BOBBY
But you heal fast.

Through the open door to the kitchen, Rayette can be seen
opening the refrigerator. She takes out a can of beer and
returns to Bobby.

RAYETTE
(over the above)
You can play the piano, an' your
whole damn family can play on some
type a musical instrument. An' all
I'm askin' is for you to listen to
my singing for one single little
second...

She hands him the can and sits back down on the couch.

RAYETTE
But you think you would? No, you're
too damn selfish...

He gestures at the name tag on her dress, and, as we'll find
he often does, speaks in the Okie-Arky accent he's learned
from working the rigs:

BOBBY
Why'nt you take 'at sign off your
tit, Ray, an' let's go on out.

RAYETTE
Out where?

She sits down and begins removing the tag.

BOBBY
I don't know, I'll holler up Elton
an' Stoney...

She thinks about it, then moves closer to him and begins
unbuttoning his workshirt, as:

RAYETTE
I'll go out with you, or I'll stay
here, and do anything you'd like for
me to do... if you'll just do one
thing. If you'll tell me that you
love me.

BOBBY
You can sing the song.

RAYETTE
(annoyed)
You know what, you are never
satisfied.

BOBBY
That's right, hand.

The response makes her deeply insecure and she immediately
lays her body against his...

RAYETTE
Oh, now, baby...

...and initiates another round of kissing.

INT. BOWLING ALLEY - NIGHT

Bobby lifts his ball from the return rack, moves to the lane
and bowls a perfect strike. Making a self congratulatory
gesture of triumph, he turns back

TO:

Elton, seated at the scoring table. His wife, STONEY, is
seated beside Rayette on the horseshoe banquette. As he
addresses Rayette, we note that Elton's two front teeth are
missing.

ELTON
(Okie accent)
Your ball, Ray.

RAYETTE
(reluctant)
Is this suppose to be fun?

BOBBY
Go on, get up there...

She rises and moves to the rack.

BOBBY
...and stay relaxed this time.

Picking up ball, she moves to the head of the lane and slings
it down the alley, watching hopefully as...

...it rolls off to the right and takes only one pin.

ON BOBBY

as she moves to her second ball.

BOBBY
Now don't loft it, just release it
like I told you.

ON RAYETTE

as she bowls the ball down the right-hand rut and comes back
to the banquette, apologizing:

RAYETTE
The ball's too heavy for me, honey...

He looks past her to Stoney, about to bowl her ball.

BOBBY
It's not the damn ball.

And as Stoney bowls a strike, Rayette hugs his arm.

RAYETTE
I'm tryin', baby, so don't start
gettin' mad now.

BOBBY
No, I'm not mad at you, hand. It'll
be all right. Just spot and follow
through...

And as Elton bowls a strike...

BOBBY
(mumbling)
Shit.

He gets up and passes Elton on his way to the rack.

BOBBY
Nice ball, El.

Rayette, to Stoney as she watches Bobby prepare to bowl:

RAYETTE
Id'n he somethin' to see?

And as he makes another strike and returns to the banquette,
she gets up and throws her arms around him. He returns her
embrace, smiling over her shoulder at:

Two heavily made-up young women (TWINKY and BETTY) taking
possession of the adjacent lane. (Note that Betty is of
diminutive proportions, while Twinky is Amazonian.)

RAYETTE
Is it my turn again?

BOBBY
Right. Now show me a little somethin'
this time, okay? Give me some form...

He remains standing, watching as she throws another gutter
ball and then comes back toward him, alibiing:

RAYETTE
I can't help it, honey, the ball
just keeps goin' cocky wobbly on
me...

BOBBY
Will you just do what the hell I
tell you...

RAYETTE
I did, didn' I, El?

BOBBY
You got another ball comin'.

She moves to the rack and, concentrating hard, advances down
the lane and releases the ball. It rolls slowly down the
center, hits at precisely the right spot and clears the pins.

ELTON
Atta boy, Ray!

Ecstatic, she comes back to the banquette, seating herself
beside Bobby and trying to solicit a response from him.

RAYETTE
That was damn good, wad'n it? I
finally did it...

BOBBY
Yeah, great.
(begins removing his
bowling shoes)
Why don't you throw Z's for 19 frames,
and then roll a strike on the last
ball in the last frame of a losing
game? Just wonderful.

Turning to address the two young women over the back of the
banquette.

BOBBY
Wasn't it, ladies?

TWINKY
(pointing at herself)
Are you talking to us?

Rayette pulls off her rental shoes and throws them to the
floor.

RAYETTE
I'm gonna go wait in the car.

He stretches his arms out on the back of the banquette as
though he intends to reside there awhile.

BOBBY
Yeah, why don't you do that.

She grabs her sling-back and her purse and as she gets up:

STONEY
Wait an I'll I go with you, honey...

As she picks up her belongings and follows Rayette:

ELTON
(changing his shoes)
We gotta get on home an' relieve the
sitter. Why'nt you an' Ray come on
over.

BOBBY
Okay. Go ahead. I'll settle up for
the beers...
(hands him the bowling
shoes)
An' walk Rayette over with you, will
you.

Elton moves off and Bobby, now full of remorse, slumps into
a depressed reverie. Beyond him, Betty and Twinky, can be
seen, engaged in some discussion concerning him.

A WAITRESS with a tray approaches and leans down to him.

WAITRESS
Can I get you anything else?

BOBBY
No. How much do I owe you?

WAITRESS
Five'll do it.

He takes some loose bills from his pocket and lays them on
her tray. She thanks him and moves off. As he reaches down
and pulls on one of his boots, Twinky approaches behind him
and leans down over the back of the banquette.

TWINKY
We been wantin' to ask you something.
Are you the guy on TV?

BOBBY
Am I on TV?

TWINKY
(pointing to Betty)
She says you're the one that sells
all the cars on TV.

BOBBY
Well, I don't claim to have sold 'em
all. They still have some left, I
believe.

Betty appears on the other side of the banquette.

BETTY
See, I told you it was him...
(then to Bobby)
Your name's Donnie something, right?

BOBBY
I leave it to you.

BETTY
My name is Shirley, but they call me
Betty, and her name's Twinky.

BOBBY
(looking to Twinky)
Twinky?

BETTY
(explaining)
Yeah, 'cause she's so "twinky"...

BOBBY
(looking from one to
the other)
Well, Betty and Twinky, it sure is
nice talking to you girls. I just
wish I had more time...

BETTY
That's a wig you wear, isn't it?

BOBBY
(touching his hair)
A wig?

BETTY
Yeah, I told her it was you, but
that you're wearing a wig, 'cause on
TV you're mostly bald in the front.

BOBBY
(to Twinky)
Your little friend's real sharp
there...
(to Betty)
Yeah, I don't like to wear the wig
on TV, because with two and a half
million people watching you, you've
gotta be sincere. I just like to
wear it when I'm out slippin' around
bowling alleys an' things like that.
I think it gives me a little more
class, don't you?

TWINKY
Oh, definitely...

BETTY
(looking at his
hairline)
Yeah, but I can see a little bitty
of the net up there, that's what
give it away.

TWINKY
It's so weird to see you in person,
but that's who she says you are.

BETTY
(to her)
It is him, he said it's him.
(to Bobby)
Aren't you.

BOBBY
Yeah, you could say it's me.

Twinky reaches over to the scoring table, picking up a pencil
and a score sheet.

TWINKY
I'm gonna give you our number, Donnie,
just in case...
(as she writes)
We're both professionals, if you
didn't guess.

BOBBY
Well, you seem very professional...

TWINKY
(handing the score
sheet to him)
I always tell everyone the same thing.
I got rolled and beat up real bad
recently, and since then it's two
for one, an' I work strictly in tandem
with Betty...

He glances at the dwarfish Betty.

BOBBY
Yeah, I can see how she'd come in
handy.

EXT. BOWLING ALLEY PARKING LOT - NIGHT

Rayette sits sulking in Bobby's car. He comes up to the
passenger window and leans down to her.

BOBBY
Come on. We're goin' over to Elton's.

RAYETTE
I'm not.

BOBBY
You just going to sit there?

RAYETTE
Yes.

BOBBY
Okay. Hope no one hits on you.

RAYETTE
I hope they do.

He casually slaps the outside of the door.

BOBBY
See you later, then...

He walks off through the lot.

ON RAYETTE

staring out through the windshield.

ON BOBBY

as he stops and comes back to the car.

BOBBY
No one would want to hit on you, you
look too pathetic.

No response.

BOBBY
Come on, DiPesto. We can still have
a good time.

RAYETTE
You're the pathetic one, not me.

BOBBY
I'm going on over there...

RAYETTE
I'm not some piece a crap.

BOBBY
I know you're not.

RAYETTE
You treat me like I was.

BOBBY
I'm sorry.

RAYETTE
(close to tears)
You go slippin' around in front a my
face, an' in front a Elton an' Stoney.
What do you imagine they think a
someone you treat that way...

BOBBY
Now, hand...

He opens the door and gets inside, putting his arm around
her.

BOBBY
Elton and Stoney know how I feel
about you. An' they're just goin' to
think I'm not too nice a guy, which
I'm not, an' that you're a hell of a
person puttin' up with me, that's
all.

RAYETTE
You're goin' a find me dead one time.

BOBBY
Sssh, come on now...
(he kisses her)
Be a good girl.

RAYETTE
If you really want a get up an' leave
me, you can read about it in the
newsprint.

BOBBY
I'm not going to get up an' leave
you.
(kisses her again,
then:)
Now let's go over to El's an' have a
good time.

RAYETTE
Do you love me, Bobby?

He hesitates briefly, then:

BOBBY
Well now, what do you think?

Though hardly an undying declaration, it's close enough to
fill her with forgiveness. Reaching over, she pulls him into
her arms.

EXT. SIGNAL HILL DERRICK - DAY

KALEIDOSCOPIC SERIES OF SCENES, showing Elton and Bobby
WORKING THE RIG as part of a four-man team. The DRILLER stands
back, giving them directives, while the prestigious
DERRICKMAN, the "star" of the team, lounges around in the
b.g. Though he has been working the fields for some months,
it is apparent that Bobby is still somewhat of a novice in
the operations of the rig.

FADE OVER ABOVE ACTIONS, TO:

INT. SIGNAL HILL DOGHOUSE - DAY

An impromptu card game, taking place on a lunch break.

(IMPROVISED) Bobby, in a buoyant mood, lays down a winning
poker hand and rakes in a pile of bills and change lying on
the table. The participants include Elton and THREE OTHER
TOOLPUSHERS. In the b.g., as the game continues, other "HANDS"
can be seen changing clothes.

INT. TWINKY'S APARTMENT - NIGHT

Bobby sits morosely on the couch beside Twinky. One of his
arms is around her, the other holds a can of beer. Both he
and Twinky are looking at...

...Elton, who rides Betty on his leg as both sing "Ride a
Cockhorse To Banbury Cross." She begins to laugh with the
hysterical abandon of a child, and Elton, nearly beside
himself, looks over to Bobby.

ELTON
God, id'n she the cutest damn thing
in your life!

EXT. SIGNAL HILL FIELD - DAY

(ELTON SINGING A RANK DOGHOUSE SONG OVER:)

REMOTE ANGLE ON BOBBY AND ELTON

Having been up all night, drinking, they move unsteadily
toward a derrick and are intercepted by the driller as they
climb the stairs to the rig floor. He informs them they are
unfit to work and "impolitely" eighty-sixes them for the
day.

EXT. BOBBY'S CAR - FREEWAY - DAY

(ELTON SINGING OVER:)

Bobby's car slows as it moves into a freeway jam.

INT. BOBBY'S CAR - FREEWAY - DAY

He gestures out at the traffic as Elton, strumming a ukelele,
concludes his song.

BOBBY
Can you believe this shit?

He takes a drink from a half pint of hard liquor, then angrily
hits at the steering wheel.

BOBBY
Goddamned freeway... Jesus Christ...

THROUGH THE WINDSHIELD

A few cars ahead, a truck can be seen carrying several
furniture pieces protected by padded covers.

ELTON
Give 'em the horn, Bob.

BOBBY
Look at these assholes! What the
hell are they doing?!

EXT. FREEWAY JAM - DAY

The assholes are going nowhere and other cars close up behind
and to both sides of Bobby's car.

INT. BOBBY'S CAR - FREEWAY - DAY

He suddenly throws the car into "park"...

BOBBY
I can't take this shit anymore.

...opens the door and gets out.

EXT. FREEWAY - DAY

ON BOBBY

moving down the freeway, away from his car. Behind, Elton
can be seen sliding over into the driver's seat.

ANOTHER ANGLE

as Bobby steps up onto the fender of a car, looking for the
cause of the jam.

DRIVER
Hey, get off my car!

INT. BOBBY'S CAR - FREEWAY - DAY

ON ELTON

ELTON
Where the hell's he goin'?

EXT. FREEWAY - DAY

Bobby cuts in front of another car and climbs up into the
rear of the truck. Moving to the front of it, he looks out
over the cab.

POV of the glut of cars in all four lanes.

ELTON
Hey, Bob! Come on! Quit foolin'
around!

EXT. TRUCK - FREEWAY - DAY

On his way out of the truck, Bobby pauses to look beneath
one of the padded protectors, then pulls it off to reveal an
upright piano. He leans down to the keyboard and plays a few
notes.

INT. BOBBY'S CAR - FREEWAY - DAY

Elton, amused.

ELTON
Shit, what's he doin'?

EXT. TRUCK - FREEWAY - DAY

Bobby has pulled the bench out from beneath the piano and,
sitting himself, begins to play a Chopin prelude.

EXT. BOBBY'S CAR - FREEWAY - DAY

THROUGH THE WINDSHIELD

Elton can be seen applauding him.

EXT. TRUCK - FREEWAY - DAY

ON BOBBY

playing as the traffic begins to move and the truck with it.

INT. BOBBY'S CAR - FREEWAY - DAY

Again, Elton leans out the window, yelling at him:

ELTON
You better get your butt off there,
Bob! Come on, now!!

EXT. TRUCK - FREEWAY - DAY

The right-turn indicator is flashing and the truck begins to
work its way across the lanes.

INT. BOBBY'S CAR - FREEWAY - DAY

ELTON'S POV

of Bobby playing, as the truck heads for an off ramp.

ON ELTON

honking the horn and flailing his arm out the window as he
tries to cross lanes. The traffic closes on his right,
preventing him from following.

EXT. FREEWAY - DAY

ANGLE INCLUSIVE OF ELTON

hemmed into the left-hand lanes, and the truck, with Bobby
still playing, pulling away on the off ramp.

EXT. TRUCK - LONG BEACH STREETS - DAY

(CHOPIN PRELUDE OVER:)

The truck slows and comes to a stop at a signal. Bobby jumps
out and moves to the sidewalk.

FOLLOWING with him as he wanders, boozed and aimless, along
the dispirited cheap streets of the city.

INT. DINER - LATE NIGHT

Rayette clears some plates from an empty table and, crossing
the diner, sees...

...Bobby entering. As he takes a seat at the counter, she
goes about her tasks, ignoring him.

He watches her as she moves to the only other customer and
totals his bill.

Another waitress appears with a coffee Silex. She gestures
it at Bobby and he nods. As she pours him a cup, Rayette
moves to the register, deposits some bills, then turns and
exits to the kitchen.

EXT. REAR OF DINER - LATE NIGHT

Bobby leans against a pickup adjacent to Rayette's car.

She comes out of the rear door of the diner, hesitates as
she sees him, then moves past him to her car.

BOBBY
I was with Elton last night, Ray.

Maintaining her attitude of suffered injustice, she reaches
to the car door and opens it.

BOBBY
It's the truth.

He reaches behind her and pushes the door shut.

Then gently taking hold of her arm, he turns her toward him,
bringing his face close to hers...

BOBBY
Rayette...

...and as she turns away, be begins to kiss her neck. She
lowers her gaze to the ground, quietly uttering:

RAYETTE
You son of a bitch.

INT. ELTON AND STONEY'S MOBILE HOME - NIGHT

Bobby, Elton and Stoney are seated on the couch, all looking
toward the TV, playing an old black-and white.

Rayette is seated on an adjacent chair, holding an infant in
her lap, cooing and fawning over it throughout the following.

ELTON
I swore to God I'd never hire on to
this type a work again. Christ, I
don't know how the hell I let you
talk me into it...

Rayette reaches over to Bobby.

RAYETTE
Give me a swig, hon'.

He hands her his beer and as she takes a sip and hands it
back:

ELTON
You didn' know I was a derrickman
once, did you?

Bobby shakes his head.

ELTON
Down in the southern fields, an'
man, did I hate it. An' Stoney's
brother was a well-puller, wad'n he,
honey? The one with three fingers?

STONEY
(her eyes on the TV)
My brother Cruser, yeah...

ELTON
I once hung suspendered 90 feet up
on a tour, like a damn circus
artist...

RAYETTE
Honey, took at this little bugger.

ELTON
Near broke my damn neck...

RAYETTE
Id'n he the cutest little guy?

BOBBY
Very cute... Put it down, an' let's
go.

Elton turns to him with a gap-toothed smile:

ELTON
You know, you oughta get you one
them things, Bob.

ON BOBBY

as he stands up...

BOBBY
(standing up)
Yeah...
(stretching his arms)
An' I oughta live in a trailer park
with my front teeth poked out...

EXT. SIGNAL HILL RIG - DAY

ON ELTON

seated on the rig floor opposite Bobby, who eats a sandwich,
as:

ELTON
Well, what if she was, Bob? I can't
see nothin' so bad in it...

Bobby scowls hostilely at him.

ELTON
What if I was to let you in on the
little fact that she is.

He looks away from Elton, not wanting to hear.

ELTON
That's right. She told me. An' she's
all tore up about it, which I hate a
see.

ON BOBBY

as he continues:

ELTON
Hell, id'n it just somethin' to face
up to? I'll tell you, somewhere along
the line, you even get to likin' the
whole idea...

ON ELTON

ELTON
I recall when Stoney first give me
the news, I could a shit...

Bobby throws his sandwich onto the rig floor near Elton's
leg. He looks down at a spatter of mayonnaise on his pants.

ELTON
Well, id'n that nice.

BOBBY
(attacking the
messenger)
It's ridiculous! I'm sitting here,
listening to some asshole cracker
compare his life to mine!

He spills out the remainder of coffee from his cup and screws
it onto the top of a thermos.

BOBBY
Just keep telling me about the good
life, Elton, if you want a see me
puke my lunch!

Elton reaches down and wipes the mayonnaise off his pant
leg.

ELTON
If you're sayin' you're somethin'
better'n what I am, that's one thing.
But I can't say much a someone who'd
run off an' leave a woman in a
situation like this an' feel easy
about it. An' that's all I gotta
say.

BOBBY
I hope that's all you gotta say, El,
'cause I'm about as tired of your
mouth as I am workin' this stinkin'
hole!

He grabs his jacket and his lunch bucket, jumps down off the
rig and begins walking toward his car parked by the Field
Office.

In the b.g., Elton gets up and hurls his hard hat toward
Bobby.

ELTON
Shit ass!!

As he approaches his car, he looks toward the Field Office,
where...

...The driller is leaning down to a car with TWO MEN in it.

ON BOBBY

calling over to him:

BOBBY
Hey, Longcipher! I'm quitting!

The driller gestures a direction to the driver of the car,
and as it pulls off, he moves toward the office:

BOBBY
Longcipher! I'm talking to you!

The driller opens the office door and looks back to Bobby.

BOBBY
Did you hear me?! I said I'm quitting!

DRILLER
I don't give a shit what you do.
You been more trouble than you're
worth, an' I'm damn glad to be rid
of both a you assholes.

He goes into the office and closes the door.

ON BOBBY

throwing his jacket and his lunch bucket into his car. As he
starts to get in, his attention is drawn back to the rig.

POV:

The car that held the two men is parked next to it, and both
men are on the rig platform moving toward Elton. He backs
away from them, breaks toward the rig tour and starts to
climb it. One of the men catches hold of his leg and yanks
him back. Elton pulls loose from him, jumps to the ground
and begins running with both men in pursuit.

BOBBY
Hey! What's goin' on?!

He starts sprinting back to the rig.

The first man has a hold on Elton and is struggling to subdue
him. He is joined by the second man, and as they force his
arms behind his back and cuff his wrists...

...Bobby MOVES INTO FRAME, grabbing onto the first man and
wrestling him away from Elton.

ELTON
Don't do that, Bob!! It's the Law!

Bobby hurls the man onto the ground and turns around to go
after the second man, struggling with Elton.

ELTON
It's the Law, Bob, don't mix in!

The second man pushes Elton aside and as Bobby throws a punch
at him...

ELTON
Look out behind!

...the other grabs him from behind, holding him, while the
second man jams a fist into his stomach and, as he doubles
over, follows with a violent chop to the back of his neck.

Bobby slumps to the ground, and as the first man puts a knee
into his back and prepares to handcuff him:

ELTON
Hey, don't do that. Don't you think
you could just leave him...

The second man takes hold of Elton and starts to move him
off.

ELTON
Sure as hell he wouldn' a done that
if he'd known who you was... Would
you, Bob?

Bobby, dazed, raises his head from the dirt, looking toward
Elton.

BOBBY
Christ Almighty, what's happening
here?

SECOND MAN
Okay, let him go.

As he starts pushing a resistant Elton toward the car, Bobby
sits up.

BOBBY
Tell me what in the hell's going on,
Elton!

ELTON
I got accused a robbin' a fillin'
station down in the Indian Nation,
didn' I tell you...

SECOND MAN
Come on.

ELTON
I got wild an' jumped my bail...

SECOND MAN
Move it!

He takes him roughly by the arm and moves off with the first
man following.

ELTON
(over his shoulder,
to Bobby)
An' here they come runnin' after me
a year later... Ain't that somethin'?

ON BOBBY

looking toward:

The two men forcing Elton into the rear seat of the car, as
he calls back to Bobby:

ELTON
Tell Stoney for me, will you?! Tell
her to come get me...

They close the door on him and get into the car. As it drives
off...

Bobby sits watching until it disappears from sight, then he
sits back against a pump casing and drops his head onto his
chest.

INT. TWINKY'S APARTMENT - NIGHT

CLOSE ON TWINKY'S FACE

She opens her mouth and rends the air with a keening wail.
Her face beads with moisture and journeys through expressions
indistinguishable from grief and anguish. Presently, an
ecstatic and very professional screech issues from her, after
which she reaches up and pulls Bobby down onto her, breathing
into his ear...

TWINKY
Donnie, oh Donnie...

INT. RECORDING STUDIO - DAY

(BACH PARTITA FAINTLY UNDER:)

Bobby, dressed in a suit and tie, moves through a network of
hallways, checking the door numbers.

He arrives at a door designated as Studio A, and, after
hesitating for a moment, opens it and steps inside.

INT. STUDIO A RECORDING BOOTH - DAY

(BACH PARTITA UNDER:)

TWO RECORDING ENGINEERS glance at him without interest and
return to their dials and needles.

Bobby looks from them through the glass partition to the
recording studio in view beyond.

POV:

ELIZABETH "TITA" DUPEA is at the piano, intensely into the
Bach. She wears a monastic-looking dress, her unruly hair is
pinned back from her face, and her glasses lie on the bench
beside her.

ON BOBBY

watching her with both affection and appreciation.

ON TITA

She is "sounding" as she plays, in tones out-of-key and
discordant with the Bach.

FIRST ENGINEER
There she goes again.

Bobby glances over at him, then looks back to Tita.

POV:

She hunches over the keyboard and plays an arpeggio, humming
a long monochromatic note.

SECOND ENGINEER
My 1-year-old can carry a tune better
than that.

Bobby is about to defend her, when the engineer flips a toggle
switch and addresses the mike feeding into the studio:

SECOND ENGINEER
Miss Dupea.

There is no response and she continues playing.

SECOND ENGINEER
(more emphatic)
Miss Dupea.

TITA
(annoyed)
Yes.

Bobby can be seen in the b.g., having difficulty restraining
his irritation under the following:

SECOND ENGINEER
I'd like to remind you again, this
isn't an opera or a musical comedy.

TITA
Oh... I'm sorry. Was I singing again?

SECOND ENGINEER
If you want to call it that.

TITA
Well, you have to simply tell me,
that's all.

SECOND ENGINEER
That's exactly what I am doing, again.

TITA
Do you have to let me get halfway
through the movement first? This is
tiring me.

SECOND ENGINEER
I have a suggestion. Why don't we
take a break.

TITA
Oh, for pity's sake...

She puts her elbows on top of the piano and drops her head
into her bands.

FIRST ENGINEER
Is she going to cry again?

TITA
I don't want to take a break.

SECOND ENGINEER
What would you like in your coffee?

She makes a mumbled response, her head still in her bands:

TITA
Tea.

BOBBY
Would you tell her Bobby's here?

SECOND ENGINEER
(to the mike)
Miss Dupea, Bobby's here.

She raises her head, squints toward the booth, then grabs
her glasses from the bench and puts them on.

INT. RECORDING STUDIO - DAY

Bobby enters the studio and comes toward her, opening his
arms. She rushes into his embrace, burying her face in his
shoulder.

TITA
(very emotional)
Oh my goodness... Bobby...

BOBBY
Hi, Tita.

She raises her head to look at him, and verging on tears:

TITA
Robert Eroica...

BOBBY
Now don't...

TITA
No, I'm not...
(taking a deep breath,
then:)
I'm not.

BOBBY
That's good.

A NEW ANGLE

Tita sits on the piano bench, crying and searching through
her purse for a tissue. Bobby hovers behind her, gently
patting her on the back and glancing with some embarrassment
toward the recording booth.

TITA
I just can't look at you.

BOBBY
Don't, then.

As she blows her nose into the tissue, a young man comes
into view, hands Bobby a paper cup and leaves. Tita takes
another tissue from her purse and dabs at her eyes.

TITA
You always do this to me.

BOBBY
Well, I don't mean to.
(setting the cup down
on the piano)
Here's your tea, Tita.

TITA
Thank you...
(then:)
Oh no, don't put it on there...

She quickly picks up the cup and places it on the floor.

BOBBY
Sorry.

TITA
(caressing the piano)
This is a very special, very old CB
275...

BOBBY
Oh.

TITA
You know who it once belonged to?

BOBBY
No.

TITA
Waldnit von Schnechter. Prewar.

BOBBY
(politely)
No kidding.

He sits down on the bench beside her...

TITA
It has absolutely no objectionable
idiosyncrasies...

...and tests it out with a brief flourish on the keys. She
watches him, then:

TITA
Robert...

BOBBY
(stops playing)
Very nice.

TITA
I have to talk seriously with you...

BOBBY
Everybody still up on the Island?

TITA
Well, Herbert's mostly on the mainland
because of the orchestra, so at the
moment, there's just Daddy, Carl and
myself... and Van Oost.

BOBBY
Who's Van Oost?

TITA
(not fond of the
subject)
Catherine -- she's a pianist. She's
working with Carl.

BOBBY
Carl's a fiddler. What's he doing
coaching piano?

TITA
Well, 11 months ago he was on his
bicycle, on his way to the post office
in La Roche... and he ran into a
Jeep and sprained his neck...

Bobby laughs.

BOBBY
Sprained his neck?

Tita laughs, then:

TITA
It's not funny. He permanently
sprained his neck, and since then
it's been extremely difficult for
him to tuck the violin.

BOBBY
Crashes into a Jeep and totals his
neck.
(shaking his head)
That's Carl...

TITA
Robert, I have to tell you
something...

BOBBY
What?

TITA
Daddy's very ill.

BOBBY
Oh, well, what, what's he...

TITA
He's had two strokes.

He looks away from her, not wanting to hear any more.

TITA
He's not... They feel he... maybe he
might not recover, and that he'll
either...

BOBBY
(standing up)
Don't tell me about this...

He moves away from the piano and Tita turns to look at him.

TITA
But don't you think it's right,
though, that you should see him, at
least once...

SECOND ENGINEER'S VOICE
(miked)
We're ready Miss Dupea.

TITA
(to the booth)
Just a minute, please!
(to Bobby)
Robert, don't you think it's right
that you should see him?

He moves aimlessly about trying to subdue his anguish.

BOBBY
Yeah... I guess so...

TITA
I'm going back up tonight. Will you
go with me?

BOBBY
No...

He glances at her, catching her profound disappointment.

BOBBY
I'd rather drive up myself and...
maybe go into Canada after... And I
can't stay long, Tita, probably a
week, at the most.

TITA
I know.

He looks toward the booth.

BOBBY
Well...
(then, to Tita)
I better let you...

TITA
Wait...

She gets up from the bench and goes to him, taking hold of
his arm.

TITA
I'll walk out with you...

As they move to the hall door, she addresses the booth:

TITA
I'll be back in two minutes!

SECOND ENGINEER'S VOICE
Cut that in half, will you?

She smiles at Bobby as they go out into hall.

TITA
They hate me, I feel.

FOLLOWING WITH THEM

down the hallway.

BOBBY
Maybe you better stay, then.

TITA
No, I need to talk to you, about so
many things...

BOBBY
Well, I'll be seeing you in a couple
of days, won't I?

They stop at the stairway.

TITA
Oh God, I'm so glad, Robert, that
you're coming...

BOBBY
Yeah, me, too...

TITA
It'll be so good for you, and for
Daddy, because you know, you've never
really...

BOBBY
(cutting her off)
Tita, I've got to go...

TITA
All right...

He kisses her.

TITA
Okay.

Feeling herself about to break down again, she attempts a
valiant smile and stands watching as...

...Bobby turns and goes down the stairs.

EXT. RAYETTE'S HOUSE - DAY

(TAMMY WYNETTE'S "D-I-V-O-R-C-E" OVER:)

ON BOBBY

moving from his car, up the walkway and entering Rayette's
house.

INT. RAYETTE'S LIVING ROOM - DAY

ON THE STEREO

playing the above song.

ON BOBBY

looking from...

...a rumpled blanket on the couch, to...

...a can of beer and a lighted cigarette burning in an ashtray
on the coffee table.

BOBBY
(calling out)
Hello?!

He crosses to a hall and moves down toward the bedroom.

BOBBY
You have the day off?!

He steps into the doorway, to see:

Rayette, lying in bed, her back against the pillows, staring
at the wall.

BOBBY
Are you sick?

No response.

BOBBY
You heard about Elton, I guess.

She turns her gaze to the window. He looks at her briefly,
then:

BOBBY
Okay, I get your point.

As he moves to the closet:

BOBBY
Hope you didn't strain yourself,
getting in here and into your pose
before I hit the door.

He picks up a suitcase from the closet floor, grabs some of
his clothes from the rack, and, moving to a chair, sets the
suitcase on it and begins packing.

BOBBY
I have to go home. My father's sick.

Rayette turns on her side, making a snorting sound of
disbelief.

BOBBY
Yeah, it's very funny.

He moves to a dresser, extracts his underwear and returns to
the suitcase.

BOBBY
I'll be gone two or three weeks.

RAYETTE
(not looking at him)
You'll be gone, period.

He closes the suitecase, secures it...

BOBBY
I'll try and call you from up there.

...and picking it up, moves around the bed toward the door.
He stops, setting the suitcase on the bed and looking down
at her.

She is still faced away from him, her shoulders trembling as
she weeps soundlessly.

BOBBY
(very emotional)
Come on, DiPesto. I never told you
it would work out to anything. Did
I?

He looks away from her, to the window.

BOBBY
I'll send you some money, that's all
I can do.

Returning his gaze to her:

BOBBY
And... I'll call you, like I said...
(he pauses, then)
Bye, Ray.

An audible sob finally comes from her. Bobby quickly picks
up the suitcase and moves out of the bedroom and down the
hall.

EXT. RAYETTE'S HOUSE - DAY

ON BOBBY'S CAR

as he moves into view. He throws the suitcase in through the
rear window, moves around to the driver's side and gets in.

INT. BOBBY'S CAR - DAY

He starts the motor, angrily throws it into gear and places
his hands on the wheel.

INT. RAYETTE'S LIVING ROOM - DAY

BOBBY'S HAND slashes at the arm of the record player, pulling
it across the grooves and stifling Tammy Wynette.

BOBBY
Do you want to go with me, Ray?

EXT. BOBBY'S CAR - HIGHWAY - DAY

(WYNETTE'S "WHEN THERE'S A FIRE IN YOUR HEART" OVER:)

His car moves north along the Pacific Coast Highway.

INT. BOBBY'S CAR - HIGHWAY - DAY

(WYNETTE OVER:)

ON BOBBY

looking over at Rayette and smiling.

ON RAYETTE

She returns his look with absolute devotion, then reaches
over and caresses the back of his neck.

EXT. BOBBY'S CAR - INLAND HIGHWAY - DAY

(WYNETTE OVER:)

OUT PAST Bobby's profile, to a Southern California pastoral
landscape passing by.

INT. BOBBY'S CAR - BIG SUR COUNTRY - DAY

ON RAYETTE

singing the above song.

RAYETTE
"There's been hot spells/An' cold
spells ever since we met/I've seen
your small fires/Your big fires/But
I won't give up yet/Oh someday you'll
yearn/'Cause your heart's gonna
burn/For that old familiar glow/You'll
be burned..."

Bobby laughs and she looks over at him.

RAYETTE
You like it?

BOBBY
I love it.

RAYETTE
(resumes singing)
"You'll be burned out/Or smoked
out/An' come back to me, I know..."

Bobby's attention is taken by something on the road ahead.

RAYETTE
"Every trail that you blaze/Makes
me..."

BOBBY
What the hell is that?

POV THROUGH WINDSHIELD

of a car lying upside down on the left side of the highway.

TWO FIGURES are standing beside it, engaged in a heated
argument.

RAYETTE
Is it an accident?

EXT. BOBBY'S CAR - HIGHWAY - DAY

Bobby pulls off onto the right-hand shoulder, stops the car
and gets out. He moves out to the center line, looking across
the road, to:

A long-haired young woman (PALM) in Levi's and parka,
presently pushing her close-cropped, boyish looking friend
(TERRY) against the side of the car and making some
indecipherable accusation.

BOBBY
Hey! What's going on, what's the
trouble?!

The young woman turns and gives him the finger.

PALM
Rotate, mack!

ON RAYETTE

sticking her head out the driver's window.

RAYETTE
What'd she say?

ON PALM

gesturing angrily back at the wreck as she crosses toward
Bobby.

PALM
Look at my car! Piece of shit! I
just bought it brand new from a used-
car lot, and the steering goes to
the pot on me!

BOBBY
You're lucky no one was hurt.

PALM
Seven hundred dollars, down the
toilet! I'd like to go back and punch
the son of a bitch out! Can you give
us a lift?

Without waiting for a response, she moves back to Terry, who
is retrieving some of their belongings from the highway.

PALM
Come on, Terry, we got a ride!

RAYETTE
Jesus, what a rude person...

INT. BOBBY'S CAR - ON THE ROAD - DAY

Palm and Terry, still under the spell of their roadside tiff,
sit in sulky silence in the back seat.

Bobby glances at Palm in the rear view.

BOBBY
What's your name?

PALM
Palm Apodaca.

Rayette turns around and, thinking Terry is a boy, asks rather
flirtatiously:

RAYETTE
An' what's your name?

TERRY
Terry Grouse.

Shocked at the female voice coming from "him," she turns
back around and pokes Bobby on the leg.

BOBBY
(loudly)
What?

RAYETTE
(low tones)
I'll tell you...
(spelling out)
...l-a-t-e-r.

PALM
How far are you going to?

BOBBY
Washington.

PALM
We'll get off in Washington and hook
another ride.

BOBBY
Where are you going?

PALM
Alaska.

BOBBY
Alaska? Are you on vacation?

TERRY
(sullenly)
She wants to live there, because she
thinks it's cleaner.

BOBBY
Cleaner than what?

PALM
(to Terry)
You don't have to tell everybody
about it. Pretty soon they'll all go
there and it won't be so clean.

BOBBY
How do you know it's clean?

PALM
I saw a picture of it. Alaska is
very clean. It appeared to look very
white to me... Don't you think?

BOBBY
Yeah. That's before the big thaw.

She leans forward, looking annoyed.

PALM
Before the what?

EXT. BOBBY'S CAR - NORTHERN HIGHWAY - DAY

(COUNTRY & WESTERN INSTRUMENTAL OVER:)

ON THE CAR

moving through the Redwood country above San Francisco.

INT. BOBBY'S CAR - HIGHWAY - DAY

ON BOBBY

bored, as he drives. Beside him, Rayette primps in the
sunvisor mirror.

ON THE BACK SEAT

Terry lights a cigarette while Palm, staring morosely out
the window, goes into a soliloquy:

PALM
I had to leave this place. I got
depressed, seeing all the crap. And
the thing is, they're making more
crap, you know? They've got so many
stores and stuff and junk full of
crap, I can't believe it.

BOBBY
Who?

PALM
Who? People, that's who! Pretty soon
there won't be room for anyone.
They're selling more crap that people
go and buy than you can imagine.
Oofh! Crap! I believe everybody should
have a big hole where they throw in
all this stuff and burn it.

Rayette leans around to her.

RAYETTE
There'd never be a hole big enough.
Now look at me, for instance, when I
was just one person, before Bobby, I
had so much garbage collectin' onto
me every day, I was thinkin' about
gettin a dispose all...

PALM
A dispose-all, what's that but more
crap? I've never seen such crap.
Oofh, I don't know how people get up
in the morning.

TERRY
Mass production is what does it.

PALM
What do you mean "mass"... I have to
come out and tell you, you're not
that clean, either.

TERRY
Wait a minute. I'm not that neat,
maybe, but I am clean.

PALM
Well, you're not that bad, but some
people... I mean, people's homes,
just filth. I've been in people's
homes...

TERRY
In my personal observation, I think
that more people are neat than are
clean...

PALM
In my personal thing, I don't see
that. I'm seeing more filth. A lot
of filth. What they need to do every
day, no, once in a while, is a
cockroach thing, where they spray
the homes. And uh... can you imagine,
if their doors were painted a pretty
color, and they had a pot outside,
with...

TERRY
Yeah, it could be adorable...

PALM
And they picked up! I mean, it
wouldn't be filthy, with Coke bottles
and whiskey, and those signs
everywhere...

She gestures angrily out the window at the roadside
billboards.

PALM
...they oughta be erased! All those
signs, selling crap, and more crap,
and, I don't know, it's disgusting,
I don't even want to talk about it!

Bobby starts to say something:

BOBBY
Well...

PALM
It's just filthy. People are dirty.
I think that's the biggest thing
that's wrong with people. I think
they wouldn't be as violent if they
were clean, because then they wouldn't
have anybody to pick on... Oofh...
Dirt...

RAYETTE
Well...

PALM
Not dirt. See, dirt isn't bad. It's
filth. Filth is bad. That's what
starts maggots and riots...

She suddenly leans over to the front seat, pointing to a
semi ahead.

PALM
Hey, follow that truck. They know
the best places to stop.

RAYETTE
That's an old maid's tale.

PALM
Bullshit! Truck drivers know the
best eating places on the road.

Rayette turns around, asserting:

RAYETTE
Salesmen and cops are the ones. If
you'd ever waitressed, honey, you'd
know.

PALM
Don't call me "honey," mack.

RAYETTE
Don't call me "mack," honey.

PALM
I wouldn't be a waitress. They're
nasty and full of crap.

RAYETTE
You better hold onto your tongue!

PALM
(giving her the finger)
Hold onto this.

Terry laughs.

RAYETTE
Just one minute, you! Don't you ever
talk to me like that!

BOBBY
Shut up! All of you!

INT. ROADSIDE CAFE - DAY

All four are seated at a booth. The women have given their
orders and a WAITRESS stands above Bobby, waiting for his:

BOBBY
(looking at his menu)
I'll have an omelette, no potatoes.
Give me tomatoes instead, and wheat
toast instead of rolls.

The waitress indicates something on the menu with the butt
of her pencil.

WAITRESS
No substitutions.

BOBBY
What does that mean? You don't have
any tomatoes?

WAITRESS
(annoyed)
No. We have tomatoes.

BOBBY
But I can't have any. Is that what
you mean?

WAITRESS
Only what's on the menu...
(again, indicating
with her pencil)
A Number Two: Plain omelette. It
comes with cottage fries and rolls.

BOBBY
I know what it comes with, but that's
not what I want.

WAITRESS
I'll come back when you've made up
your mind...

She starts to move away and Bobby detains her.

BOBBY
Wait, I've made up my mind. I want a
plain omelette, forget the tomatoes,
don't put potatoes on the plate, and
give me a side of wheat toast and a
cup of coffee.

WAITRESS
I'm sorry, we don't have side orders
of toast. I can give you an English
muffin or a coffee roll.

BOBBY
What do you mean, you don't have
side orders of toast? You make
sandwiches, don't you?

WAITRESS
Would you like to talk to the manager?

PALM
Hey, mack!

BOBBY
(to Palm)
Shut up.
(to the waitress)
You have bread, don't you, and a
toaster of some kind?

WAITRESS
I don't make the rules.

BOBBY
Okay, I'll make it as easy for you
as I can. Give me an omelette, plain,
and a chicken salad sandwich on wheat
toast -- no butter, no mayonnaise,
no lettuce -- and a cup of coffee.

She begins writing down his order, repeating it sarcastically:

WAITRESS
One Number Two, and a chicken sal
san -- hold the butter, the mayo,
the lettuce -- and a cup of coffee...
Anything else?

BOBBY
Now all you have to do is hold the
chicken, bring me the toast, charge
me for the sandwich, and you haven't
broken any rules.

WAITRESS
(challenging him)
You want me to hold the chicken.

BOBBY
Yeah. I want you to hold it between
your knees.

The other three laugh, and the waitress points to a "Right
to Refuse" sign above the counter.

WAITRESS
You see that sign, sir?!

Bobby glances over at it, then back to her.

WAITRESS
You'll all have to leave, I'm not
taking any more of your smartness
and your sarcasm!

He smiles politely at her, then:

BOBBY
You see this sign?

He reaches his arm out and "clears" the table for her.

INT. BOBBY'S CAR - ON THE ROAD - DAY

ON PALM

in the back seat.

PALM
Fantastic! That you could figure all
that out, and lay that down on her,
to come up with a way you could get
your toast.

BOBBY
I didn't get it, did I?

PALM
No, but it was very clever... I would
of just punched her out.

EXT. BOBBY'S CAR - HIGHWAY - DAY

(COUNTRY & WESTERN OVER:)

ON THE CAR

moving through the Northwest coastal region.

INT. BOBBY'S CAR - HIGHWAY - DAY

Palm resumes her monologue:

PALM
People... Oofh...
(shaking her head in
utter disgust)
Animals are not like that... They're
always cleaning themselves. Did you
ever see... What are they called?
Pigeons!

She looks over at Terry, slumped in her seat, asleep.

PALM
He's always picking on himself and
his friends. They're always picking
bugs out of their hair...

ON RAYETTE

asleep.

PALM (O.S.)
Monkeys, too.

ON PALM

PALM
Except monkeys do things out in the
open that I don't go for.

ON BOBBY

benumbed, his eyes glazed over as he stares out through the
windshield.

ON PALM

PALM
I was in this place once, this store,
with snakes, monkeys, everything you
could imagine. I walked in, I had to
run out. It stunk! They didn't even
have an incense going...

Though no one listens, she goes on, working herself up:

PALM
And you know, I read where they
invented this car that runs on...
that runs on... when you boil water...

TERRY
(half-dead)
Steam.

PALM
Right, steam. A car you could ride
around in and not cause a stink. But
do you know, they will not even let
us have it. Can you believe it? Why?!
Man! He likes to create a stink. I
wrote them a note once, and told
them to clean it... I mean, don't
you see that? It's just filthy! I
mean, I've seen filth you wouldn't
believe! Oofh, what a stink! I don't
even want to talk about it...

EXT. BOBBY'S CAR - TWO-LANE HIGHWAY - LATE DAY

(WYNETTE'S "WHEN THERE'S A FIRE" OVER:)

ON PALM AND TERRY

deposited at the side of the highway, with their luggage,
duffle bags and television set lying on the road edge. Terry
lifts a bored hand to wave at...

...Bobby, behind the wheel. He waves back, pulls out onto
the highway and drives off.

EXT. BOBBY'S CAR - MOTEL - NIGHT

(MUSIC FADES, AS:)

The car pulls into a motel parking slot and stops.

INT. MOTEL ROOM - NIGHT

Bobby and Rayette in bed. She lies on her side, watching him
watch TV. After a moment:

RAYETTE
Are you depressed about your daddy,
honey?

BOBBY
No.

RAYETTE
I 'magine it's me then, id'n it?

BOBBY
Is what you?

RAYETTE
You're depressed that I come along.

BOBBY
Who said I was depressed?

RAYETTE
Well, is that a happy face I see?

No response.

RAYETTE
'Cause if it was me, I could just
catch a Greyhound back.

BOBBY
Oh, you're not going to kill yourself
this time. I wish I'd known...

He turns off the light on the night stand and rolls onto his
side, faced away from her.

They lie silently in the dark for a moment. Then:

RAYETTE
I don't know if I'm gonna be able to
sleep or not.

No response.

RAYETTE
(looking over at him)
Hint, hint.

No response.

RAYETTE
(sighing; then:)
I guess I'll just have to count the
sheep.
(closing her eyes)
One-two-three-four...

She opens her eyes and looks over at him.

RAYETTE
Seven... eight...
(caressing his shoulder)
Look at this old cold shoulder, what
am I gonna do with it?

He looks around at her and with gentle good humor:

BOBBY
If you just wouldn't open your mouth,
everything would be fine.

She turns an imaginary key at her lips.

RAYETTE
Tick a lock.

He rolls over to face her and, yielding to her request, begins
to make love to her.

EXT. MOTEL ROOM - DAY

Rayette following after Bobby. As he moves to his car, he
removes some cash from his wallet.

RAYETTE
Why can't I go out to your folks'
house? Give me one good reason.

BOBBY
I have to see how things are first.
My father's sick, you understand?
They wouldn't be prepared for me
bringing anyone.

He holds out a roll of bills and as she takes them:

RAYETTE
So how long am I supposed to sit an'
twiddle my thumbs in this place?

BOBBY
If you can't do what I ask, Ray, use
that money to go back home, then.

RAYETTE
Bobby, don't talk like that...

She moves over to him and gives him a quick kiss.

RAYETTE
It'll be all right, I'll get a hold
a some magazines an' things like
that. An' maybe find a beauty salon
an' get my hair fixed, okay?

ON BOBBY

getting into the car.

BOBBY
Okay, Ray...

RAYETTE
Or maybe sit out by the pool an' get
myself nice an' tan for you. Would
you like that?

BOBBY
(starting the engine)
Sure...

RAYETTE
It brings out my eyes...

BOBBY
Bye, honey, I'll call you in a couple
of days.

RAYETTE
Okay...

She watches unhappily as he backs out of the slot and the
car pulls away.

RAYETTE
Bye, baby...

EXT. FERRY (CROSSING) - DAY

Bobby gets out of his car and wanders the deck of the ferry.
He stops to look out over the Sound to one of the islands
off the Washington coast, then glances back to the mainland,
receding in the distance.

EXT. BOBBY'S CAR - FERRY LANDING - DAY

Bobby drives off the ferry onto the island.

EXT. BOBBY'S CAR - COUNTRY ROAD - DAY

The car moves over a tree-lined country lane and presently
turns off onto a private road, leading to a large Victorian-
style house. It pulls to a stop behind two other cars.

Bobby gets out of the car and moves up the porch steps to
the front door.

CLOSER ON him as he hesitates, listening briefly to the FAINT
SOUND of two pianos coming from within.

Then he opens the door and goes inside.

INT. DUPEA HOME - DAY

(TWO PIANOS OVER:)

Bobby tentatively wanders the first floor of the house, taking
in the ghosts of the past.

In the living room, he pauses at a table to look at several
framed photographs. He picks up one of his mother and father,
looks closely at it, then gently returns it to its place and
resumes wandering.

He stops at the music room and looks in through the half-
opened door:

POV INTO MUSIC ROOM:

On the far side of the room, near windows which give view to
a verdant exterior, are two concert grands. His brother CARL
is seated at one of the pianos, and a young woman (CATHERINE
VAN OOST) is seated at the other.

ON BOBBY

looking from Carl, to Catherine. He watches her briefly,
then steps out of the doorway...

...and moves down a hallway to a closed door. He reaches
down and opens it, looking inside to:

TITA

grooming the hair of an elderly man (NICHOLAS DUPEA) seated
in a wheelchair with his back to Bobby.

She looks up and, seeing Bobby, smiles happily, then reaches
down and turns the wheelchair around.

ON NICHOLAS

His eyes are half-closed and are cast down to the floor.

Bobby moves over to him, bending down and looking into his
face. Nicholas opens his eyes slightly and gazes through
Bobby into an absolute elsewhere.

Bobby raises his eyes to Tita.

BOBBY
He doesn't even know who the hell I
am.

INT. DUPEA DINING ROOM - NIGHT

Nicholas Dupea sits at the head of the table, being fed his
dinner by a male nurse (SPICER).

Bobby, at the opposite end of the table, is seated next to
Tita. Unable to bear looking at his father, he glances over
at Catherine, seated next to Carl on his right.

She raises her eyes from her plate to ask him something,
just as Tita is moved to reminisce:

TITA
Remember, Bobby, what mother used to
say when...

CATHERINE
(to Bobby)
How long have you been...
(To Tita)
Oh, excuse me...

TITA
No, it's all right, you go ahead...

CATHERINE
I was just going to ask Robert how
long he's been away from here.

BOBBY
Four or five years.

CARL
No, the last time was three years
ago.

TITA
Oh no, it's been much more than that.

CARL
Away from the piano, Tita, you have
no sense of time at all.

TITA
I don't think that's true.

CARL
It is true.

TITA
Besides being very rude.

CATHERINE
What have you been doing since then?

BOBBY
What have I been doing? Different
things, different jobs, here and
there. Nothing that interesting.

CATHERINE
And you no longer play at all?

Bobby starts to reply and is interrupted by:

CARL
You know, just after I came back off
tour with the Betenthaller Quartet,
Dad, myself and Herbert had a summit
conference about you...

TITA
Oh, my, "a summit conference." I
wonder where I was, polishing silver
behind the coal bin.

CARL
I don't know where you were, penis
envy.

TITA
I hope I didn't hear that.

CARL
At any rate, Dad wanted to hire a
private detective to ferret you out,
and I said, "What for?" Whatever the
hell he's doing, even if it's a
completely wasteful escapade, it's
entirely his business. Simple as
that...

BOBBY
Well, I really appreciate it, Carl.

TITA
I don't think you should infer Daddy
was wrong in front of him...

She looks at Spicer, pushing a spoon at Nicholas's closed
mouth.

TITA
Don't force him like that, Spicer.

Spicer lays the spoon down and begins eating his own dinner.

BOBBY
(to Catherine)
How long have you been staying here?

TITA
A couple of months.

He starts to ask another question and is again overridden
by:

CARL
Did you hear about my misfortune,
Robert?

BOBBY
What?

CARL
It's still nearly impossible for me
to turn my neck. If I wanted to turn
toward Catherine, for instance, I'd
first have to twist the whole base
of my body around...
(demonstrating)
...like this...

Tita gets up from the table and, taking her plate, exits to
the kitchen. And as Carl readjusts himself in his chair and
takes a sip from his wine glass, Bobby looks at Catherine to
find her looking at him. She quickly alters her gaze to Carl.

CATHERINE
I wouldn't mind doing a little work,
if you're finished, and not too
tired...

CARL
No, I'm finished...
(placing a hand on
his stomach)
Satiety is my father and mother.

Finding he's amused himself and nobody else, he gets up and
addresses Bobby.

CARL
She's tremendously gifted, this girl.

BOBBY
(looking at her)
Is she?

Catherine stands up and, wanting to change the subject:

CATHERINE
Excuse me, I don't want to hear
this...

She exits and Carl, on his way out, pauses at Bobby's chair.

CARL
I hope you feel at home, Robert.
(patting him on the
shoulder)
I'm really glad you're here.

BOBBY
Thanks, Carl...

He looks down table to see Spicer stacking his plate onto
Nicholas's and his eyes follow him as he, too, moves out of
the dining room to the kitchen.

CLOSE ON BOBBY

in extreme discomfort at being left alone with his father.
He looks down at his plate, poking at the remainder of his
dinner, then braves a look down the table.

ON NICHOLAS

looking back at him, his eyes devoid of interest or cognition.

EXT. DUPEA GROUNDS - DAY

Bobby and Tita walk away from the house down toward the ocean.
Accompanying them is a Borzoi hound belonging to her.

TITA
He has ways of communicating, Robert.
I can tell when he's expressing
approval or disapproval, just from
his eyes...

BOBBY
Uhm hmm. Some range.

TITA
It's not that bad.

BOBBY
Yes, it is. I can't take seeing him,
sitting there like a stone.

TITA
A week or two isn't going to ruin
your life, for Godsakes.

He doesn't respond.

TITA
I mean, you think I'm that happy?

BOBBY
No, I don't.
(a pause, then:)
You should've left a long time ago.

TITA
We can't all get up and leave, can
we? I mean, there are certain needs
you have to respond to...

She stops walking and moves to one of the garden chairs,
facing out toward the bay.

TITA
And anyway, I want you to stay, so I
can spend some time with you, and
ask you some questions...

He leans his back against a tree.

BOBBY
What questions?

TITA
Well, do you -- I mean, have you
enjoyed all these... strange things
you've been doing?

BOBBY
Sometimes.

She stares at him for a moment, and taking note of it:

BOBBY
Why? Am I some kind of freak to you
or something?

TITA
No, no, I don't think that, I'm just
curious about it...
(a pause)
Do you think I'm a freak?

BOBBY
Sort of.

She laughs.

TITA
Oh no... Why? What is it? The way I
look?

BOBBY
No, I don't really think you're a
freak.

TITA
I probably am, but I don't care. I
mean, I wasn't that blessed to begin
with, and when would I have had time
to make any improvements...

BOBBY
What about Carl and Catherine? Is he
just coaching her, or what?

TITA
Constantly. Night and day. And unless
I get up before the birds, I can't
get in any practice time for myself...

BOBBY
Uhm hmm.

TITA
Actually, it's very admirable, the
way she works. She'll probably be
enormously successful, because she's
attractive as well, not that that's
so important in music, but...

BOBBY
You're attractive, Tita. If you just
did a little more with yourself...

TITA
Like what?

BOBBY
Well, if you just maybe did something
with your hair, or...

TITA
Oh, let's not talk about my hair, it
does what it wants to, and anyway,
who cares, I want to talk about you...

BOBBY
There's nothing to say, Tita...

He offers nothing further and looks out over the bay. Then,
after a brief silence:

TITA
Well, you're not going to run out on
me right away, are you?

BOBBY
I don't know.

INT. DUPEA HOME - DAY

Bobby strolls casually about the house -- in truth, looking
for an opportunity to run into Catherine.

He moves to the music room and looks inside.

THROUGH THE DOORWAY

Catherine can be seen, seated at the piano. Carl stands above
her and they engage in some exchange about the score resting
on the piano's music stand.

ON BOBBY

as he moves down the hallway and sees:

Spicer descending the staircase, with the brittle Nicholas
in his arms.

He ducks into the nearest room to avoid them.

INT. DEN - DUPEA HOME - DAY

Tita, startled in the act of appraising herself in a mirror
above the fireplace, turns around to Bobby:

TITA
Oh God, don't sneak up on me like
that!

We see she wears a little make-up and has done something
"different" with her hair.

BOBBY
Sorry.

He turns and exits the den.

EXT. DUPEA HOUSE - DAY

Bobby stands on the front porch, looking toward...

...Catherine coming up from the ocean. She wears a bathrobe
over a wet bathing suit and carries a towel, and as she
approaches:

CATHERINE
Hello...

BOBBY
I guess you fell in the water.

CATHERINE
(amused)
Yes, intentionally.

BOBBY
That's dangerous, you know.

CATHERINE
Swimming?

BOBBY
Playing piano all day and then jumping
into cold water. You could get a
cramp.

She laughs and begins drying her hair with a corner of the
towel.

CATHERINE
I love to swim, and I don't mind the
cold at all. It's invigorating.

BOBBY
Well, I wouldn't want to get too
invigorated myself.

CATHERINE
Why?

BOBBY
What would I do with it? Run amok?

She comes up the stairs.

BOBBY
Besides piano and swimming, what
else do you do?

CATHERINE
Well, there's fishing and boating.
There's concerts on the mainland
and... but I feel silly telling you.
This is really your home. You probably
know better than I what there is to
do.

BOBBY
Nothing.

CATHERINE
Nothing? Then it must be very boring
for you here.

BOBBY
That's right. Have you anything to
suggest?

CATHERINE
I don't know. Let me give it some
thought.

She moves toward the front door, with Bobby following.

BOBBY
What're you doing right now...

INT. DUPEA HOME - DAY

Catherine comes inside and moves toward the stairway, with
Bobby behind.

CATHERINE
Right now I'm going to run a hot tub
and soak myself.

BOBBY
Then after that?

She goes up a few steps and turns back to him.

CATHERINE
After that, I plan to read some music
and rest for awhile.

BOBBY
Tomorrow, then.

CATHERINE
Tomorrow's a full practice day...
(continues up the
stairs)
But the day after is kind of open.

At the top of the stairs, she stops and looks down at him.

CATHERINE
Carl has hydrotherapy on Tuesdays.

BOBBY
(as if it were a year)
The day after tomorrow.

CATHERINE
If you're free.

BOBBY
Yeah, I'll probably be free.

She turns and disappears into the second-floor hallway.

INT. DUPEA KITCHEN - NIGHT

Dinner has concluded and Tita moves around the table,
distributing cups and saucers. Carl is remote and off his
feed. Spicer attends Nicholas, and Catherine looks across
the table to Bobby as he drinks from a bottle of beer.

After a moment, a loud belch comes from Nicholas and Tita
quickly requests:

TITA
Don't laugh...

She attempts to stifle her own amusement, as do Bobby and
Catherine, then changes the subject:

TITA
What's wrong, Carl, you hardly ate
anything...

CARL
I took some aspirin and it really
upset my stomach.

Catherine begins pouring the coffee.

CATHERINE
One thing that's hard to understand
is how you could have this incredible
background in music, and then just
walk away from it, without a second
thought...

BOBBY
I gave it a second thought.

Tita seats herself at the table, addressing Spicer:

TITA
He looks tired to me, Spicer. I think
you should put him to bed.

He nods, and as he gets up and wheels Nicholas from the room:

CATHERINE
I mean, how could you not play
anymore? That's so strange to me...

BOBBY
I have played a few times. Here and
there. As a matter of fact, I was
once a rehearsal pianist for a Las
Vegas musical revue.

CATHERINE
You don't call that music, though.

BOBBY
Of course I do. It's music. You
know...

He places his hands on the table and simulates the playing
of a rousing production-type show-stopper, simultaneously
vocalizing as he does.

Though Tita and Catherine are amused, Carl winces
disapprovingly and breaks into Bobby's act:

CARL
Robert, do you mind?

BOBBY
What?

CARL
Nothing. Will you excuse us for a
while?

He takes hold of Catherine's hand and stands up.

CATHERINE
We really don't have to, Carl, if
you're not feeling good...

CARL
(a bit martyred)
Well, maybe if we put the Thermaphore
on me for a while, first...

CATHERINE
Oh, all right.

And as they move to the door, she glances apologetically
back at Bobby.

Deflated and embarrassed, he looks away from Tita's
sympathetic gaze. After a brief silence, she reaches to a
platter on the table.

TITA
Do you want some gingerbread?

BOBBY
(elsewhere)
What?

TITA
With applesauce?

BOBBY
No, thanks...

INT. DUPEA LIVING ROOM - NIGHT

Bobby stands in the living room. It is dark and the only
light comes from some burning logs in the fireplace. He
listens briefly to the sounds of a Beethoven sonata coming
from the music room...

...then moves to a chaise near the fireplace and lies down,
staring absently into the flames. After a moment, he closes
his eyes.

ANOTHER ANGLE

on his sleeping face as the sonata begins to FADE.

INT. DUPEA LIVING ROOM - MORNING

ON BOBBY

still asleep in the chaise. He is suddenly jolted awake by a
loud thud and sits up, looking out the

WINDOW TO:

POV OF SPICER

lifting a barbell with heavy weights attached to it. He does
a series of vigorous presses with it, before he again lets
the bar drop heavily onto the porch.

INT. DUPEA HOME - UPSTAIRS HALL - DAY

(BACH VIOLIN OVER:)

Bobby stands in the hallway, a phone to his ear, listening
to Rayette and looking down the hall toward the open door to
Catherine's room.

BOBBY
Yeah, well fine, you know what I
suggest, Ray...
(listening)
Because I don't know how long. Things
are not going that well here...

He listens again, his eyes on Catherine, moving around in
her room.

BOBBY
Yeah, well I'm not having any fun,
either, so why don't you...
(pause)
No, you can't, it's just not
convenient, and I have to get off...
(listening impatiently)
Ray, I really have to go, I have to
get off now...
(longer pause)
Another couple of days, maybe. I'll
call you and let you --
(pause)
All right, if you're gone, you're
gone. Now I have to get off, okay?
(pause)
Bye, Ray...

He hangs up and, as he starts down the hall to Catherine's
room, the VIOLIN STOPS and Carl steps out into the hall ahead
of him. He carries his fiddle and detains Bobby, with:

CARL
Only 10 minutes of playing and it's
already killing my neck...

Bobby looks past him to Catherine as she glances out at them
and then closes the door to her room.

EXT. DUPEA GROUNDS - DAY

Bobby and Carl, playing a game of table tennis. Tita stands
leaning against a tree, watching them.

In the b.g., Spicer can be seen, meticulously oiling and
cleaning the wheelchair.

As they volley the ball back and forth:

BOBBY
You sure you should be playing, Carl?

CARL
What do you mean? Aside from my neck,
I'm in superb shape.

Carl hits into the net, and as the ball rebounds to him, he
tosses it to Bobby.

BOBBY
(serving)
I don't know, there's something wrong
with the way you move.

Carl hits the net again.

CARL
I'm not aware of it. Like what?

BOBBY
Your serve. Two -- Eighteen.

Carl serves and as they volley:

BOBBY
I'd hate to see you walk across a
concert stage like that.

Carl tries a smash and mis-hits the ball...

BOBBY
Two -- Nineteen.

and as he retrieves it:

CARL
(irritated with Bobby)
I've walked across a stage a number
of times, without exciting any
particular response...

BOBBY
That's what I mean...

Carl comes back to the table.

CARL
Any particular humor, I meant.

He angrily serves the ball.

BOBBY
(returning)
I think you should get someone to
coach you how to walk. I think it's
a substantial problem.

He hits a smash and it sails past Carl into some shrubbery
several yards away.

CARL
Dammit!

As he moves after the ball, Bobby gestures at him.

BOBBY
Look at that.

TITA
Why are you being so mean?

BOBBY
I'm not. He does walk funny. Don't
you see that?

She looks at Carl, bent over and searching through the shrubs.

TITA
I don't think I'd notice. I'm so
used to Carl.

BOBBY
(wanting to go on
about it)
Yeah, well, he's...

She interrupts him, looking toward Spicer.

TITA
Bobby? Do you think Spicer is
attractive?

He looks over at Spicer, polishing the frame of the
wheelchair.

BOBBY
I think he's got a terrific
personality.

TITA
You know, he was formerly a sailor.

Bobby gestures his paddle at Carl, on his way back with the
ball.

BOBBY
Look, can't you see that, what I'm
talking about?

TITA
Sailors are sadistic, I feel.

Carl comes up to the table, asserting:

CARL
See? There's nothing wrong with the
way I walk. Now where are we?

BOBBY
At game, Carl.

Carl serves and they volley briefly. Then Bobby angles the
ball sharply and puts it away.

BOBBY
That's three games to none, Carl.

CARL
All right, let's have a rematch.

BOBBY
I thought you had to go to the
mainland today. Aren't you going to
miss the ferry?

Carl takes a quick glance at his watch, then drops his paddle
onto the table.

CARL
Too bad. Just when I was hitting my
stride.

He starts away, then turns back.

CARL
Say goodbye to Catherine for me,
will you?

As he moves off in the direction of the cars, Tita comes up
beside Bobby.

TITA
Can I play now?

Carl calls over to them from his car:

CARL
Tell her I'll be back sometime
tomorrow!

Bobby turns to Tita.

BOBBY
Where is she, anyway?

TITA
(ignoring the question)
My turn.

He hands her the paddle...

BOBBY
Why don't you and Spicer play?

...and moves off toward the house.

INT. DUPEA HOME - UPSTAIRS HALL - DAY

Bobby knocks on Catherine's door and, hearing no response,
opens it and steps inside.

INT. CATHERINE'S ROOM - DAY

He wanders about, discreetly touching nothing, but taking in
some essence of Catherine from her belongings and from the
scent of her that lingers in the room.

His journey brings him into proximity with the windows and
he pauses to look out at:

TITA AND SPICER BELOW

playing table tennis.

He starts to move from the windows, when he sees:

CATHERINE'S CAR

pulling into view and parking near the garage. She gets out,
and, carrying a shopping bag and a wrapped bouquet of flowers,
pauses on her way to the house to have some exchange with
Tita.

INT. DUPEA HOME - STAIRCASE - DAY

ON BOBBY

quickly descending the staircase, and FOLLOWING with him as
he moves to the music room and goes inside, leaving the door
open.

INT. MUSIC ROOM - DAY

He crosses to one of the grands, seats himself and rubs his
hands together to warm them. Then, scanning his mental
repertoire, he places his hands on the keyboard and begins
to play a Chopin etude.

Presently, Catherine appears in the doorway. She stands
listening for a moment, then places the shopping bag and
flowers on a settee near the doorway and crosses to a chair
near the pianos and sits down.

Bobby glances at her, then returns his eyes to the keyboard.

ON CATHERINE

her features intensely concentrated, as she listens to his
playing.

ON BOBBY

apparently deep into the music. On the wall behind him are
the series of photographs seen in the opening and the present
ANGLE FAVORS an 8-year-old Bobby in his dress suit, playing
a recital.

THE CAMERA MOVES down to his hands...

...then to Catherine, profoundly moved.

ANGLE INCLUDING BOTH

as Bobby plays the concluding chords of the etude. He lets
his hands linger on the keys until the last overtones fade,
then he removes them to his lap.

After a brief silence:

CATHERINE
That was beautiful, Robert. I'm
surprised...

BOBBY
Thank you.

CATHERINE
I was really very moved by the way
you...

Unable to keep up the "serious" musician pose, a brief,
derisive laugh issues from him.

CATHERINE
Is that funny?

BOBBY
It wasn't supposed to be, it just
struck me that way.

CATHERINE
Why?

BOBBY
Nothing. It's just that... I picked
the easiest piece I could remember.
I think I first played it when I was
8 years old and I played it better
then.

CATHERINE
It doesn't matter. It was the feeling
I was affected by.

BOBBY
I didn't have any.

CATHERINE
You had no inner feeling?

BOBBY
None.

CATHERINE
Then I must have been supplying it.

She gets up and crosses toward the settee.

BOBBY
Wait...

CATHERINE
Well, at least you're accomplished
at something...

BOBBY
What?

CATHERINE
At being a fake.

And as she picks up the flowers and the shopping bag:

BOBBY
Catherine...

CATHERINE
No, you're very good at it. I'm really
impressed.

She goes out the door.

Bobby looks down at the keyboard. He closes the cover and
softly utters:

BOBBY
Shit.

INT. CATHERINE'S BEDROOM - DAY

She stands in front of a dresser mirror, pinning up her hair,
preparatory to taking a bath. Her attention is drawn to...

...Bobby entering, and as he crosses to her, she quickly
turns back to the mirror.

BOBBY
You think I'm a fake.

CATHERINE
I think it's what you think.

BOBBY
No, it isn't what I think.

CATHERINE
Look... You made a very calculated
move, and then made me feel
embarrassed for responding to you.
That wasn't necessary.

She moves away from him and he follows her.

BOBBY
Yes, it was. You've made it clear
that if I can cut a little piano, I
might get a little response.

CATHERINE
(stops and turns to
him)
I don't think that's accurate...

BOBBY
Up to now, what I've been getting
from you are meaningful looks over
the dinner table and a lot of vague
suggestions about the day after
tomorrow...

CATHERINE
I'm not conscious of having given
you any meaningful looks. And as for
the day after tomorrow, this is the
day after tomorrow, and I am,
unfortunately, seeing you... Now if
you'll excuse me, I'd like to take a
bath.

She moves back to the dresser and as she begins searching
through an array of bath oils on top of it, Bobby steps in
beside her.

BOBBY
It's convenient to fake looking for
something right now, isn't it?

CATHERINE
I'm not faking anything. I'm looking
for some bath oil...

BOBBY
Some bath oil?

He lifts up one of the bottles.

BOBBY
What about this one?
(picking up another)
Or this one?
(and another)
How about some jasmine?
(and another)
What about some musk?

CATHERINE
What are you doing!

BOBBY
(knocking the bottles
over)
What are you doing, screwing around
with this crap?!

A little intimidated by his aggressivity:

CATHERINE
I don't find your language that
charming.

BOBBY
It's direct, anyway, which seems to
be difficult for you.

CATHERINE
I'd like you to leave now. Is that
direct enough?

He makes no move to go.

CATHERINE
You're not a serious person, by your
own admission. And that may be
interesting, but it doesn't interest
me...

Needing the safety of distance, she moves over to the windows
next to the bed. Again, he follows after her.

BOBBY
Serious, that's what's important to
you?

CATHERINE
Yes, that's what's important to me...

He takes her by the shoulders...

BOBBY
Okay, let's be serious...

...and forces her onto the bed.

CATHERINE
No, don't do that...

BOBBY
Shut up...

He hesitates for a moment, full of things he wants to say
and cannot. Catherine looks up at him, uttering a quiet
challenge:

CATHERINE
No inner feeling.

BOBBY
That's right.

CATHERINE
I don't believe vou.

He leans down to her, begins kissing her. Her arms encircle
him and laying back on the bed, she pulls his body onto hers,
fervently returning his kisses. And as he responds with an
ardor absent of fakery and full of a lifetime of derelict
feelings, a FADE

OVER BEGINS, TO:

INT. CATHERINE'S BEDROOM - DAY

Catherine and Bobby lie side by side. He watches her as she
addresses the ceiling:

CATHERINE
I married him when I was 17. He was
a cellist, and I thought he was the
most brilliant man I'd ever met...
And I'm sure he was, because at that
age, I hadn't met that many... But
he was insidious, you know. He had
me convinced that I was a mediocrity,
musically, as a woman, as an
intellect. But in this completely
imperceptible, pleasant way, so that
you weren't even sure he was doing
it. Anyway, I just woke up one morning
and I said, you know something Joseph,
you're full of beans, and I left
him...

BOBBY
That's what you said?

CATHERINE
Something witty and devastating like
that.

She moves onto her side, looking over at him.

CATHERINE
As a matter of fact, he's the one
who introduced me to Carl...
(a pause, then:)
How are you?

BOBBY
I'm fine.

CATHERINE
Carl restored my confidence. He really
did. He's much more substantial than
you give him credit for.

BOBBY
Is he?

CATHERINE
Yes.

She reaches over, tentatively caressing his face, then:

CATHERINE
Do you think you could discreetly
move across the hall now?

BOBBY
Yeah, I think I could.

He kisses her, gets up and crosses to the door, and as he
opens it:

CATHERINE
Robert?

BOBBY
What?

CATHERINE
I could spend some time with you
tomorrow morning, before Carl comes
back, I mean, if you'd like to.

BOBBY
Of course I'd like to.

EXT. LA ROCHE WOODS - DAY

(CHOPIN OVER:)

Bobby and Catherine walk over a path through a thickly wooded
area that presently brings them in sight of the Dupea house.
He stops and, taking hold of her, leans back against a tree,
kissing her. When they break off and resume walking, she
takes one of his hands in both of hers and, after looking at
the scars and callouses accumulated by his years of manual
labor, she lays the hand against her cheek.

The ANGLE ALTERS from them, to:

EXT. DUPEA HOUSE - DAY

A taxicab pulls up in front of the house. Rayette gets out
with her suitcase and, after paying the driver, moves up the
steps to the front door and reaches out to ring the bell.

INT. DUPEA DINING ROOM TABLE - NIGHT

ON RAYETTE

looking down the table to Nicholas.

RAYETTE
You certainly do have a beautiful
piece a real estate out here, Mr.
Dupea.

ON NICHOLAS AND SPICER

the former with his chin resting on his chest.

RAYETTE
(turning to Bobby)
Can he hear me?

Bobby doesn't respond.

TITA
(politely)
He's not hard of hearing.

RAYETTE
Well, that's a blessing, at least.

She takes a bite of food, and as she chews:

RAYETTE
This certainly is an improvement on
the motel an' the coffee shop.
(to Bobby)
How could you have left such a
beautiful place, Bobby?

BOBBY
I don't know.

ON CARL

fascinated with Rayette, while beside him, Catherine keeps
her eyes on her plate as she eats.

CARL
You've been staying in a motel all
this time?

RAYETTE
For two whole weeks, an' there wasn't
hardly nobody there to talk to but
me. The manager of the place told me
it was the off season, an' it must a
ben, because other'n me, there was
just this 25-year-old kid, DeLyon,
that didn't appear to be all there,
an' this old married pair next to me
that was always hollerin' for quiet.
Can you imagine? All you could a
heard there was a pin, an' them,
hollerin' away...

CARL
I don't understand why you had to
stay in a motel. There's more than
enough room here.

RAYETTE
Well, I was goin' to, but Bobby said
he hadda kind of feel things up here
first, which I can understand, but
then it went an' took so long, I ran
flat outa money...
(to Bobby)
I didn't have no number to call, you
know.
(to Carl)
So I hadda clear outa there an' come
on up here, in the hopes that I
wouldn't be intrudin' myself...

CARL
Oh, no. You're more than welcome.

RAYETTE
Well, thank you, that's a very nice
thing for you to say.

CARL
Not at all.

She goes on eating and there is a brief silence before she
resumes, looking over at Catherine:

RAYETTE
That certainly is a beautiful head a
hair you have.

CATHERINE
Thank you.

RAYETTE
Is it natural?

BOBBY
Rayette.

RAYETTE
What?

BOBBY
Just finish eating.

RAYETTE
Oh, am I holdin' up dessert?

Carl laughs.

CARL
No, you're not. Go ahead and take
your time.

RAYETTE
I do eat slow as a bird, whereas
Bobby can put it away like a speed
swing...
(to Tita)
Is there any ketchup around?

BOBBY
Oh, for chrissakes...

CARL
Robert, let's not be rude, okay?

RAYETTE
It's all right. He don't mean anything
by that.

BOBBY
I don't, huh?

He throws his napkin on the table, gets up and leaves the
room. There is an awkward silence, followed by Rayette
valiantly covering her own feelings:

RAYETTE
I guess Bobby's just about the
moodiest man I ever been with...

INT. FISHERMAN'S BAR - MAINLAND - NIGHT

(TAMMY WYNETTE'S "DON'T TOUCH ME" OVER:)

Bobby finishes the last of several drinks. He ships a half
pint into his jacket pocket, lays some bills on the bar and
moves toward the door.

EXT. FISHERMAN'S BAR - MAINLAND - NIGHT

(WYNETTE OVER:)

Thoroughly anesthetized, he wanders aimlessly through the
harbor-front streets. As he disappears into the dark, the
MUSIC FADES.

EXT. WHARF - MAINLAND - DAWN

ON BOBBY

lying huddled on the boardwalk next to the boat slips. The
crying of the gulls and the sound of outgoing fishing launches
awaken him. Disoriented, he gets to his feet and, hugging
himself against the cold, moves unsteadily down the dock.

EXT. FERRY - MORNING

Bobby's car pulls off the ferry and approaches a line of
cars waiting to board. He sees Catherine at the wheel of the
first car, and pulling abreast of her, stops and rolls down
his window.

BOBBY
Where are you going?

CATHERINE
I'm going to pick up some friends of
Carl's. Are you all right?

BOBBY
I have to talk to you.

CATHERINE
I'll be back later...

The blocked cars behind each of them begin HONKING impatiently
and CONTINUE TO under the following:

BOBBY
No, I want to talk to you now. I
have to explain something about...

CATHERINE
No, you don't have to, it isn't
necessary...

BOBBY
(overlapping her)
Yes, it is!

A DRIVER behind Bobby sticks his bead out the window, yelling
furiously at him:

DRIVER
Come on, get moving, dammit!!

BOBBY
(turning around to
him)
Will you shut up for a minute!!
(to Catherine)
Pull your car out of line.

CATHERINE
No, I can't...

BOBBY
Will you let me talk to you, please?

CATHERINE
I can't do that. I haven't been being
fair to Carl. I have to tell you
that.

BOBBY
(barely audible)
Oh. You have to tell me that.

CATHERINE
What?! I can't hear you!

He looks back at her not responding.

CATHERINE
I'm sorry everything's been so
confusing, but I have to go, Robert...

BOBBY
Catherine...

CATHERINE
Please, I'll see you later this
evening.

She pulls ahead and moves onto the ferry.

INT. DUPEA LIVING ROOM - NIGHT

FAVORING SAMIA GLAVIA

a friend of Carl's. (Somewhere under the following, the ANGLE
ALTERS to include TWO OTHER FRIENDS, as well as Carl,
Catherine, Bobby and Rayette, seated around the living room,
variously captive to her monologue.)

SAMIA
But the point is, man is born into
the world with a pre-existent
adversary, both real and imaginary,
so you'd have to say that aggression
was one of his primary, psychic
inheritances, which...

JOHN FINCHER, a professorial type, attempts to interject:

FINCHER
If I may beg to differ...

SAMIA
Beg all you like, John, but the fact
remains that man takes enormous
delight in aggressive acts, as well
as the portrayal of aggressive acts,
and to be triumphant over another no
matter how, seems fundamental to his
having a sense of well being, as
well as...

FINCHER
No, I don't quarrel with your
inference, but you draw too long a
bow in your conclusions, which seem
unnecessarily harsh and...

SAMIA
Well, I don't make poetry. As an
analyst, I...

Rayette interrupts, calling across the room to Carl:

RAYETTE
Is there a TV in the house?

Carl starts to answer and is pre-empted by Samia:

SAMIA
John believes in the basic goodness
of man, and that's fine, but gaze
into the pit like I have and that
view seems a little soporific. And
not unlike television, it hardly
represents the real world...

RAYETTE
There's some good things on it,
though.

SAMIA
Pardon me?

RAYETTE
The TV. There's some good things on
it, sometimes.

SAMIA
I strongly doubt it, but I wasn't
really discussing media...

FINCHER
If you really hold such bleak views,
how can you, in good conscience,
carry on a practice?

SAMIA
Oh, there's always hope, I think,
for a few individuals, if they're
courageous enough to shed their
illusions and their...

CATHERINE
(cutting her off)
And what about love?

SAMIA
What about it? Wouldn't you agree
that a great deal of mischief has
been done in the name of love?

CATHERINE
No, I wouldn't.

SAMIA
Well, you're a romantic, Catherine,
as are most musicians, and what's
more, about to be married...

ON BOBBY

and his reaction as Samia goes on:

SAMIA
...which should exclude you from any
objective discussion. But keep in
mind, even the arts aren't free of
aggressive content, nor the
institution of marriage.

CATHERINE
I think these cold, "objective"
discussions are aggressive, Samia...

She gets up and starts to move away.

SAMIA
But I'd like to say, so that I don't
dampen the spirit of your adventure...

CATHERINE
(cutting her off)
You haven't dampened my spirit,
Samia... Excuse me.

SAMIA
Well, I should hope not...

She leaves the room, with Bobby's eyes following her, and as
Carl moves over to sit beside Rayette, Samia resumes to
Fincher while the other friend moves in beside Bobby and
tries to engage him in conversation.

SAMIA
Because obviously there are loftier
classes of people that do establish
a kind of relating, that's relatively
free of... (Etc.)

ON CARL AND RAYETTE

as she indicates Tita's dog, lying near the fireplace.

RAYETTE
What kind of doggy is that?

CARL
It's a Borzoi.

RAYETTE
Oh, uh huh. I had a little kittycat
once, that Bobby give me...

She calls across to Bobby, interrupting Samia.

RAYETTE
Remember, Bobby?! The little pussycat
you gave me?!

Bobby, now feeling trapped by the other friend, looks across
to her as she returns her attention to Carl.

RAYETTE
She had four little white paws, an'
oh, was I crazy over her. We hadda
go an' leave her one time at some
friends, an' she went out an' got
smashed flatter'n a tortilla right
outside their mobile home.

Samia gestures toward Rayette as if she were an example to
prove her point.

SAMIA
There. You see what I mean?

Bobby looks over at Samia.

SAMIA
The choice of words, "squashed flat,"
juxtaposed against the image of a
fluffy kitten...

RAYETTE
Well, she was.

SAMIA
Perhaps...

She addresses Fincher gesturing toward Rayette again.

SAMIA
But you see how close that is to
what I'm trying to...

Bobby stands up, cutting her off:

BOBBY
Don't sit there pointing at her.

SAMIA
I beg your pardon.

BOBBY
(advancing on her)
I said, don't point at her like that!
What gives you the right to sit there
and tell anybody about class and who
the hell's got it, and what she
typifies! You shouldn't even be in
the same room with her, you creep!

SAMIA
Carl, this is really too much...

BOBBY
(to Samia)
You're totally full of shit!

CARL
Robert, I think you better just...

BOBBY
(cutting him off)
You're all full of shit!

He turns away and exits the room.

INT. DUPEA HOME - NIGHT

FOLLOWING WITH BOBBY

running up the stairs and down the hall to Catherine's room.
He goes inside and, not finding her, comes quickly back into
the hall. As he moves down it, opening other doors, he begins
calling her name.

He comes back down the stairs and runs into Rayette at the
bottom landing.

RAYETTE
Bobby...

BOBBY
(moving past her)
I can't talk to you right now, leave
me alone...

He moves to the music room, to the den, then down the main
hall to the kitchen, which gives off to two other doors. He
opens one of them, to see:

INT. SPICER'S ROOM - NIGHT

Tita and Spicer. Though both are clothed, they are caught in
some stage of intimacy on top of Spicer's bed. Tita sits up
immediately, mortally embarrassed, as Bobby steps into the
room.

BOBBY
Tita, what the hell are you doing?!

Spicer stands up.

SPICER
Hey, this is my room.

BOBBY
(moving over to the
bed)
What's going on here!?

TITA
It's none of your business!

BOBBY
Where's Catherine?!

TITA
I don't know where she is!

Spicer moves to Bobby, taking hold of his arm.

SPICER
Don't you believe in knocking, pal?

Bobby roughly pushes him away and advances on Tita.

BOBBY
I'm talking to you, Tita!

TITA
(close to tears)
Can't I have anything to myself,
dammit?!

SPICER
(grabbing hold of him
again)
Come on now, out!

BOBBY
(struggling with him)
Keep your fucking hands off my sister,
nurse!

Spicer goes into sudden rage, pushing Bobby violently toward
the door and yelling:

SPICER
Did you hear me! Move out!!

Bobby leaps at him and as their struggle carries them into
the kitchen, Tita begins yelling:

TITA
Stop it! Bobby, will you just stop!
I mean it!

Spicer gets Bobby into a painful headlock and is being bulled
around the kitchen by him.

SPICER
Hold it, just hold it!!

They crash into the kitchen table, knocking chairs over.

TITA
Carl! Somebody get Carl!

Bobby rams Spicer into the refrigerator.

SPICER
Take it easy, dammit!

He hurls him against the kitchen wall, still holding him in
a headlock as Tita enters the kitchen.

TITA
Stop it! Right now! Just stop it!!
Carl!!

And as she runs from the room, Spicer begins violently jerking
his forearm up against Bobby's trachea, punctuating each
jerk with the repeated command:

SPICER
Give up! Give up! Give up! Give up!
Give up! Give up!

He feels Bobby's body slacken. He releases him and Bobby
drops to the floor as...

...Carl, Catherine and Tita run into the kitchen,

LOOKING TO:

Bobby, gasping for air, tries to get up from the floor, and
unable to, slumps back against the kitchen wall.

TITA
Oh God, Bobby, look what you've
done...

He looks past her, to Catherine.

BOBBY
I just wanted to talk to you for a
minute.

EXT. BAYFRONT - DAY

Catherine and Bobby sit on a low stone wall bordering the
Dupea property. Each is staring out at the ocean, and after
a moment:

CATHERINE
No. It's useless, Robert. It wouldn't
work, not ever...

BOBBY
Just give me a chance, will you?

CATHERINE
I'm trying to be delicate with you,
but you're not understanding me.
It's not just because of Carl, or my
music, but because of you...
(she looks at him)
I mean, what would it come to? If a
person has no love for himself, no
respect, no love for his work, his
family, his friends, something...
How can he ask for love in return?
I mean, why should he ask for it?

Profoundly wounded, he looks away from her.

BOBBY
And living out here, in this rest
home asylum, that's what you want?

CATHERINE
Yes.

BOBBY
(looking back to her)
That'll make you happy.

CATHERINE
I hope it will, yes.
(she pauses, then:)
I'm sorry.

Needing to distance herself from witnessing his pain, she
gets up and moves OUT OF FRAME.

His eyes move from her to look out over the bay and, after a
brief silence, he softly utters:

BOBBY
Okay.

EXT. COUNTRY - DAY

Bobby pushes Nicholas's wheelchair along a path between fields
of tall grasses and wildflowers. He stops and moves around
to the front of the chair.

BOBBY
Are you cold?

He leans over to adjust the blanket covering Nicholas's legs
and, hunkering down in front of him, glances around at the
fields, searching for articulation:

BOBBY
I don't know if you'd be particularly
interested in hearing anything about
me. My life, I mean... Most of it
doesn't add up to much... that I
could relate as a way of life that
you'd approve of...

He pauses briefly, then:

BOBBY
I'd like to be able to tell you why,
but I don't really... I mean, I move
around a lot because things tend to
get bad when I stay. And I'm
looking... for auspicious beginnings,
I guess...

He breaks off again, resuming with evident difficulty.

BOBBY
I'm trying to, you know, imagine
your half of this conversation...
My feeling is, that if you could
talk, we probably wouldn't be talking.
That's pretty much how it got to be
before I left...
(another pause)
Are you all right?

He searches his father's face, entreating him for some kind
of answer, some sign of response, and seeing none...

BOBBY
I don't know what to say...

...he breaks down, barely able to utter the following:

BOBBY
Tita suggested that we try to... I
don't know. I think that she... seems
to feel we've got... some
understanding to reach... She totally
denies the fact that we were never
that comfortable with each other to
begin with...
(pauses, trying to
gain control)
The best I can do, is apologize.

He looks silently at his father for a moment...

BOBBY
We both know I was never really that
good at it, anyway...

then, bowing his head:

BOBBY
I'm sorry it didn't work out.

EXT. DUPEA HOUSE - DAY

Bobby comes out the front door. He carries his suitcase and,
as he descends the steps and moves across the drive...

...Tita, wearing gloves and holding a pair of gardening
clippers, comes around the side of the house and calls out
to him:

TITA
Bobby!

He sets the suitcase down as she comes toward him.

TITA
You're leaving?

BOBBY
Yeah. I said a week, and I've
overstayed myself...

TITA
You were going without saying goodbye?

BOBBY
I didn't want to say goodbye to
anyone.

TITA
But what about me?

BOBBY
(smiling at her)
I'll say goodbye to you, Tita.

She puts her arms around him and as she embraces him:

TITA
Just once in a while, call and tell
me where you are, please...

RAYETTE'S VOICE
Watch the birdie!

They turn to see:

Rayette, standing near the open trunk of Bobby's car, taking
a Polaroid shot of them.

Bobby returns his attention to Tita, kissing her.

BOBBY
Bye, now.

TITA
(tearing up)
Bye, Robert.

He picks up his suitcase and moves to the trunk, where Rayette
is fussing with her camera. He puts the suitcase inside,
closes the trunk and takes hold of her arm.

BOBBY
Come on.

RAYETTE
(resisting him)
Wait a sec. I want Tita to take a
picture of you an' me in front of
the place...

BOBBY
No, let's go...

She pulls free of him and, as she moves back toward Tita,
Bobby can be seen getting into the driver's seat.

RAYETTE
I never got the chance to thank you
all for your hospitality. You tell
Carl for me, if any of you folks
wanta come on down to our place
anytime, you'd be more'n welcome...

TITA
Thank you, that's very nice.

RAYETTE
Bye bye, now.

She moves back to the car and gets in.

ON TITA

watching as Bobby's car pulls out of the drive and disappears
onto the private road.

EXT. HIGHWAY - DAY

As Bobby's car moves over a highway through the northern
forests, RAYETTE'S VOICE is heard SINGING:

RAYETTE
"Your kiss is like a drink when I'm
thirsty/An' I'm thirsty for you with
all my heart..."

INT. BOBBY'S CAR - HIGHWAY - DAY

Rayette is seated close to Bobby, looking at him as she sings.

RAYETTE
"But don't love me/Then act as though
we've never kissed/Oh, don't touch
me..."

She leans closer and kisses him, then bringing her lips close
to his ear:

RAYETTE
"Don't touch me..."

She kisses him again.

RAYETTE
"Don't touch me..."

And again.

RAYETTE
"Don't touch me..."

Her kisses become more fervent and insistent.

RAYETTE
"Oh, don't touch..."

He suddenly pushes her away.

BOBBY
Cut it out!

Grievously hurt by his gesture and expressive of an anger
she's heretofore been afraid to reveal:

RAYETTE
Son of a bitch, Bobby! You quit
pushin' me away like that! I've had
enough a that to last me a lifetime!

She makes a fist of her hand as though she were about to hit
him, then changes her mind.

RAYETTE
Whyn't you just try an' be good to
me for a change!?

There is no response. She turns away from him, looking out
through the windshield for a moment, then:

RAYETTE
There id'n anyone gonna look after
you an' love you better'n I do, you
know that.

She looks over at him.

RAYETTE
Baby? Did you hear me?

There is no response.

EXT. GAS STATION - DAY

ON BOBBY'S CAR

as it turns off the highway and pulls up into a gas station
next to roadside cafe.

INT. BOBBY'S CAR - DAY

ON RAYETTE

searching through her purse.

RAYETTE
I'm gonna go in that cafe an' get
some coffee. You want anything?

BOBBY
No.

RAYETTE
You got any change?

He searches into his jacket, takes out his wallet and hands
it to her.

RAYETTE
Don't you just have 50 cents or
somethin'?

He shakes his head.

RAYETTE
Okay, be right back...

She reaches to the door and opens it.

EXT. BOBBY'S CAR - DAY

Bobby gets out of the car as the station attendant approaches.

Rayette turns back to him as she nears the front of the cafe.

RAYETTE
Sure you don't want anything?

BOBBY
(to attendant)
Fill it up.

The attendant moves to the pumps, and as Bobby crosses toward
the men's room and disappears inside, a Peterbilt semi can
be seen pulling into the station.

INT. GAS STATION - MEN'S ROOM - DAY

Bobby removes his jacket and lays it on top of the waste
container. He moves to the wash basin and stands a moment,
gazing absently down at it, his mind searching for that inward
oblivion in which nothing much is demanded, nothing much
felt.

Then, leaning over and placing his hands on the rim of the
basin...

...he lifts his gaze to the mirror and, after minutely
perusing the features of his face, looks into his own eyes
as he had into his fathers, silently beseeching them for
guidance.

EXT. MEN'S ROOM - GAS STATION - DAY

(SOUND OF SEMI'S MOTOR OVER:)

REMOTE ANGLE as Bobby comes out of the men's room.

He has left his jacket inside and stands for a moment, looking
at the...

...DRIVER, bending down to check the undercarriage of the
semi. As he stands up and circuits the front of the truck,
heading for the cab:

BOBBY
(faintly audible)
Hey, wait a minute.

He moves over to him and after a brief exchange, the driver
nods his bead and continues on to the cab, Bobby moves to
the passenger door and climbs up into the pass seat.

INT. SEMI CAB - GAS STATION - DAY

The driver glances over at Bobby:

DRIVER
Haven't you got a jacket or anything
with you?

BOBBY
No, I don't, I uh... it got burned
up. Everything in the car got the
shit burned out of it. All I got
left is what I have on...

DRIVER
I've got an extra jacket behind the
seat, if you want to put it on.

BOBBY
No, it's okay.

DRIVER
Suit yourself. But I'll tell you,
where we're headed is gonna get
colder'n hell.

BOBBY
It's all right. I'm fine.

The driver puts the truck into gear and releases the brake.

BOBBY
I'm all right.

And as the truck begins to move forward:

BOBBY
I'm fine.

EXT. SEMI - GAS STATION - DAY

REMOTE ANGLE:

The semi pulls out of the station onto the highway, giving
view to Bobby's car. The attendant is cleaning the windshield
and Rayette can be seen opening the passenger door. As she
gets out and surveys the area for some sign of Bobby, the
semi MOVES INTO VIEW, going north on the highway.

Rayette looks over the hood of the car, addressing the
attendant. He gestures toward the men's room and as she moves
across the station and disappears OFF THE SCREEN...

...the semi recedes in the distance, leaving a black trail
of smoke from its exhaust stack, dissipating in the air.

THE END

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