"In writing fiction, the more fantastic the tale, the plainer the prose should be. Don't ask your readers to admire your words when you want them to believe your story." - Ben Bova [ more quotes ]

"Deadwood"

Episode Three

Written by

Jody Worth

"Reconnoitering The Rim"















Production # P103
(Script # S110)

Production Draft
July 3, 2003
July 28, 2003 Blue
Aug. 04, 2003 Pink
Sept 11, 2003 Yellow


"Deadwood"

Episode Three

CAST



Seth Bullock
Al Swearengen
Sol Star
Alma Garret
Wild Bill Hickok
Jane Cannary
Doc Cochran
Tom Nuttall
Trixie
Brom Garret
Dan Dority
Charlie Utter
Ellsworth
E.B. Farnum
Jack McCall

A.W. Merrick
H.W. Smith
Johnny Burns
Jimmy Irons
Lou Varnes
The Metz child
Con Stapleton
Leon
Man #1
Man #2
Player
Cy Tolliver
Joanie Stubbs
Artie Simpson
Huckster






"Deadwood"

Episode Three

SETS



INTERIORS

The Gem
Saloon
Swearengen's Office
Swearengen's Bedroom
Bullock's and Star's Hardware Tent
Doc Cochran's Office
Nuttall's Number Ten
Grand Central Hotel
Lobby
Dining Room
Garret's Room/Hallway
Hickok's Room
Second-Floor Hallway
The Bella Union
Saloon


EXTERIORS

Main Street
Main Street (in front of the Gem)
Ellsworth's Claim
Outside Town (burial site)
Claim Number Nine Above Discovery
Bottom Of The Gulch
Main Street (The Gem/Grand Central Hotel - Trixie's POV)
Main Street - Bullock's and Star's Hardware Tent










DEADWOOD EPISODE THREE

FADE IN:

EXT. ELLSWORTH'S CLAIM - DAY

Ellsworth works his sluice-system at the creek-bank, watches
Driscoll's dog paw at a woodchuck hole --

ELLSWORTH
(to his dog)
He's down in that hole for a fact,
and pitiful as you pursued him you
better hope he ain't got space enough
to roll around and hold his sides
and bust a gut laughing.

As the disgruntled dog give up his digging --

ELLSWORTH
'Tells the other woodchucks at the
club this afternoon he might not
even call it a escape -- might just
say it was his morning's
entertainment.

DORITY (O.S.)
Hey Ellsworth.

The dog runs for cover as Dority appears --

ELLSWORTH
Hey Dan Dority. Where's the Great
Prospector?

DORITY
I guess Brom slept in this morning.

ELLSWORTH
S'pose his enthusiasm's on the wane?

Their eyes hold --

DORITY
Always possible. If he shows up,
would you tell him I quit waiting?

ELLSWORTH
Sure I will.

DORITY
See you at the Gem.

ELLSWORTH
Always possible.

A last look between them, then Dority leaves. After a beat --

ELLSWORTH
(to the dog)
Gone.

As the cur comes out of hiding --

CUT TO:

EXT. OUTSIDE TOWN - DAY

An improvised burial area twenty feet or so off the wagon
path into Deadwood. Just beside the piled earth covering the
new grave of his brother Ned, a plain coffin with Tom Mason's
body inside is lowered into the ground with ropes by the
newspaperman Merrick and Seth Bullock. The Reverend Smith
reads from the Bible --

SMITH
"The earth is the Lord's and the
fullness thereof, the world and they
that dwell therein."

TIGHT ON BULLOCK

standing back, studying the minister --

SMITH
"For he hath founded it upon the
seas and established it upon the
floods."

Bullock's gaze rises to where Calamity Jane and Charlie Utter,
both on horseback, pass on the wagon path. Jane carries the
Metz child --

SMITH
"Who shall ascend into the hill of
the Lord, or who shall stand in His
Holy place? He that hath clean hands
and a pure heart, who hath not lifted
up his soul unto vanity nor sworn
deceitfully."

Bullock's gaze has risen beyond Jane and Utter and the child
toward the camp which is their destination, and where can be
made out the last of a series of wagons, garishly painted --

SMITH (V.O.)
"He shall receive the blessing from
the Lord and justice from the God of
his salvation."

NEW ANGLE - POV FROM SWEARENGEN'S OFFICE WINDOW

The long row of garishly painted wagons of which the wagon
Bullock saw was last. These wagons bear the dealers and
gambling equipment and other personnel of an organization
new to the settlement, and, the restlessness of the camera's
survey seems to suggest, destined to unsettle its existence.
Whores on horseback also in the organization's employ shake
their tits at gawking onlookers by way of greeting as, from
the lobby of the Simpson Hotel, the hotel's occupant's,
summarily evicted, disgorge onto the street in various states
of disarray. Atop the building a crudely lettered "Simpson
Hotel" sign is being replaced by one rendered more
professionally and rebaptizing the edifice "The Bella Union
Saloon" -- the whole process supervised by three figures
we'll come to know as Cy Toliver, Ed Sawyer, and Comstock
Joanie Stubbs. The Voiceover has continued --

SMITH (O.S.)
"Lift up your heads o ye gates and
be lifted up ye everlasting doors
and the King of Glory shall come
in."

TIGHT ON AL SWEARENGEN

Outraged, incredulous, his gaze moving as if in search of
some impression which does not portend disaster to E.B.
Farnum's Grand Central Hotel, fixing there on the figure,
observable in a second-story window, of Alma Garret, whose
eyes for this brief instant meet Swearengen's --

SMITH (O.S.)
We conclude with verses from Proverbs
Sixteen...

Behind Alma her husband Brom can be seen rehearsing; he
pantomimes, first, exaggeratedly delighted surprise at some
fortuitous meeting, then some serious discussion with the
party come-upon, and, finally, a meeting of the minds which
is punctuated by a mimed handshake; Alma seems embarrassed
to be under Swearengen's scrutiny, disappears from the window --

RESUME - SWEARENGEN

-- after a last cursory look at the street, during which he
may or may not note Sol Star's emergence from his tent in
deal-making attire, also turning away --

RESUME - BURIAL SITE

Smith, plainly unsettled, has found his new place in the
scriptures --

SMITH
"Everyone proud in heart is an
abomination to the Lord; though hand
join in hand he shall not be
unpunished. By mercy and truth is
iniquity purged, and by the fear of
the Lord do men depart from evil. A
man's ways please the Lord when he
maketh even his enemies to be at
peace with him."

Smith closes his Bible, meets Bullock's eye, then takes up a
shovel and begins to cover the grave with dirt. Careful
against impiety, Merrick moves a step closer to Bullock,
addresses him quietly --

MERRICK
Might we edify my readers Mr. Bullock?

BULLOCK
I don't know what "edify" means.

MERRICK
Can we talk about last night's
gunfight?

BULLOCK
No.

Under which Bullock has moved forward, away from Merrick; he
takes the shovel from Smith, continuing the work of burial --

CUT TO:

EXT. MAIN STREET - DAY

Swearengen, exiting the Gem, tucks the end of his night-shirt
into his pants; Star's approached from his tent, a step too
late to engage Swearengen, who's made for Farnum's familiar
face --

SWEARENGEN
What the fuck.

FARNUM
All's I can speculate Al, whoever
these Bella Union people are, they
bought Artie Simpson's place on the
quiet, prearranged turning it into a
joint.

Swearengen looks to the aforementioned Simpson --

SWEARENGEN
This no-good fucking Judas --

-- readied to ascend the wagon which will take him from the
settlement. Swearengen heads for Simpson --

SWEARENGEN
Hey Fuck-Nut!

SIMPSON
You just take it easy Al!

SWEARENGEN
How long were you hatching this
fucking plot?

SIMPSON
I made a practical goddamn business
decision!

SWEARENGEN
Selling to strangers, and no chance
for me to match their fucking offer!

SIMPSON
You couldn't've! You'd've killed me
before you'd've matched! It's between
you and them now.

SWEARENGEN
Drive careful, cocksucker!

SIMPSON
And don't think I haven't taken
precautions! --

Under which, several riders, hired by Simpson to protect
him, move into escort position --

SIMPSON
-- don't think I don't know your
mind!

Simpson brings the reins down on the harnessed horses' flanks.
The wagon lurches forward. Swearengen, his will confounded,
feels suddenly underdressed; he strides through the muck
toward the haven of the Gem. Star tries again --

STAR
I hate to press you on that lot Mr.
Swearengen --

SWEARENGEN
I ain't ready to close yet.

STAR
-- it's just we're anxious to start
building.

SWEARENGEN
If you need the answer now it's no.

As Swearengen walks away from Star, Johnny Burns falls in on
his boss' other side --

BURNS
Wu won't feed Persimmon Phil to his
pigs Al --

SWEARENGEN
Get away from me.

BURNS
-- wants five dollars to do the job.

SWEARENGEN
Get away or I'll break your jaw.

Johnny Burns stops stock-still in the mud --

ANGLE - E.B. FARNUM

considering the new operators apprehensively as he returns
to the Grand Central --

CUT TO:

INT. DOC COCHRAN'S OFFICE - DAY

Cochran's examining the Norwegian child under Jane's and
Utter's anxious supervision --

JANE
She's warm, isn't she?

UTTER
Still ain't talking neither.

JANE
That's besides the point. You shut
up.

COCHRAN
She will have fever, being wolf-bit.

JANE
Only reason we risked bringing her
into camp.

COCHRAN
You don't have to fear the saloon-
keeper. He's not a danger to her no
more.

JANE
Why not?

Cochran again touches the girl's forehead while speaking for
Utter's hearing --

COCHRAN
Saloon-keeper worried if the Little
One said road-agents killed her
people, who the road-agents might
say they worked for --

JANE
(to Utter)
Meaning him.

COCHRAN
But he took another approach to his
problem.
(beat)
She would do better indoors.

UTTER
I told Jane she could take my room
with the Little One and I'd move
back in with Bill.

JANE
I will not stay in no motel. They
don't want me, they won't give me a
room!

COCHRAN
Why don't both of you lower your
voices?

Cochran's mixed some analgesic in water, offers it to the
little girl in a spoon. Having observed Cochran's mimed
consumption of the medicine, the child takes it into her
mouth. It's as if Jane and Utter swallow the medicine
themselves, to immediate healthful effect; relief shows in
their features, and the tone of their bickering becomes
inappropriately cheerful --

JANE
(to Utter, whispers)
What did I say about noise?
(to Cochran, re Utter)
Snores the whole fucking night!

UTTER
Snoring's past a person's control!

Off which --

CUT TO:

INT. NUTTALL'S NUMBER TEN - DAY

Ass-end of an all-night poker game. Hickok, the big loser,
is drunk and composed. McCall's winnings are before him in
ostentatious stacks. Con Stapleton and Lou Varnes are the
other players. Nuttall, who's loaned Hickok more funds,
observes from behind the bar in silent misery. It's mid-hand --

HICKOK
(to Stapleton, who's
dealing)
Two.

MCCALL
Same for me only better.

STAPLETON
Three for the dealer.

Stapleton distributes the cards. Varnes is already out --

STAPLETON
(to McCall)
Opener bets.

MCCALL
Well damn, Bill, even a stopped
clock's right sometime, common logic
says you're going to win one here
pretty soon. But I'm still going to
push my luck.

McCall pushes twenty dollars into the pot, appearing only
now to notice Hickok hasn't funds enough to call --

MCCALL
Or what've you got left there? --
eight dollars?
(looks to Nuttall)
Ready to stand more credit to Wild
Bill here Tom?

Though he seems ingenuously oblivious, McCall calculates the
volume of his voice to embarrass --

NUTTALL
I didn't hear him ask for any.

MCCALL
Want me to just bet eight Bill?

HICKOK
This cover my call?

Hickok produces one of his pistols, puts it on the table.
It's just what McCall wanted --

MCCALL
Bill, I can't let you put your gun
up. That Colt's worth more than my
raise by a good forty bucks.

HICKOK
Are you taking the bet?

MCCALL
Tell you what -- I'll add forty to
my raise to make the bet fair...

He puts these chips in the table-center, smiles amiably --

MCCALL
And fifty again if you'll put up the
set.

Hickok doesn't blink, produces his second gun quickly enough
to prompt an instant's flinch in his adversary. McCall pushes
another stack forward to match Hickok's wager of the second
weapon --

STAPLETON
Pot's right.

Now the room is still, all the air sucked out. McCall lays
his hand down --

MCCALL
Nine-high straight do the trick?

Hickok lays down his cards --

STAPLETON
Pot to the club flush.

Droop-lidded McCall takes this in, tries to sustain his
bravado by meeting Hickok's gaze --

MCCALL
One in a row for you Bill.

McCall raises his hands above his head, stretching
theatrically --

MCCALL
Who's hungry? -- what the hell damn
time is it anyways?

Hickok stares at McCall as he collects his guns and holsters
them --

HICKOK
Sure you want to quit Jack? Game's
all that's between you and getting
called a cunt.

STAPLETON
Whoa.

NUTTALL
Meeting's adjourned fellas. Take it
all outside.

HICKOK
That dropped eye of yours looks like
a hood on a cunt to me Jack. When
you talk your mouth looks like a
cunt moving.

MCCALL
I ain't getting in no gunfight with
you Hickok.

HICKOK
But you will run your cunt-mouth at
me.

Hickok's voice is heavy with sleeplessness and alcoholism
past alleviation by drink --

HICKOK
And I will take it to play poker.

He rises, looks to Nuttall, indicates his stacked chips --

NUTTALL
I'll tote up accounts Mr. Hickok and
we'll do whatever wrist-business we
need to next you're in.

Hickok nods, looks to those at the table --

HICKOK
Anyone 'wants to can find me at the
Grand Central.

As Hickok walks out --

CUT TO:

INT. GRAND CENTRAL HOTEL - LOBBY - DAY

Several tenants displaced from the Simpson Hotel congregate
outside the Grand Central lobby as, behind the desk, Farnum
resists Utters's effort to gain housing for the Norwegian
child and Jane --

FARNUM
A guest checking out severs his
connection with his room --

UTTER
I ain't checking out -- I'm saying I
can move over with Mr. Hickok...

FARNUM
By my lights Sir that is a checkout,
and a checkout can't stipulate the
room's next occupant.

JANE
(to Utter)
I said they'd find a way to stop me.

UTTER
If it's raising room rates you're
after go ahead and raise 'em.

FARNUM
Rates aren't the only factor --

Farnum's gesture invokes those outside --

FARNUM
-- there's a waiting list for
occupancy!

JANE
You undertaker-looking son-of-a-bitch --
this little girl's doctor-ordered to
live indoors and I'm assigned to
change her dressings.

FARNUM
A sad story that's none of my affair
Madam --
(pinch-lipped)
-- if I guess your sex correct.

HICKOK (O.S.)
What's the problem Innkeeper?

They see him --

FARNUM
Mr. Hickok.

Brom Garret, descended from the second floor, pauses to listen --

UTTER
Little One took fever in that wagon
last night Bill. I thought Jane and
her could stay in my room and I could
move back in with you.

FARNUM
I'm not in opposition Sir. Just the
opposite! Who wouldn't want to
accommodate a sick little girl?! But
the Simpson Hotel's closed its doors!
If Mr. Utter's vacating, shouldn't
these people who've been trying me
all morning get first call? Isn't
that simple fairness?

JANE
(to Hickok, re Farnum)
He don't give fuck-all for fairness --
he just don't want me in here.

HICKOK
(to Farnum, re Utter
and Jane)
How about if he stays in his room
and the lady moves in with me. That
way no one's vacating nothing.

Jane puts her hand on the reception desk for support --

FARNUM
(weak)
That would out-flank the checkout
issue but it might raise questions
of decorum.

HICKOK
With who?

Farnum tries to get spit enough to swallow --

FARNUM
No one pertinent I 'spose.

HICKOK
(to Farnum, re Jane)
Let her in. I'm going to get some
breakfast.

As Hickok heads for the dining room, Farnum, taking up the
master key-ring, calls after him --

FARNUM
There will be a rate adjustment.

Hickok's disappeared around the corner. Brom moves past Utter --

BROM
'Morning. Excuse me.

-- heading for the dining room to seek an audience with
Hickok. Utter watches the disgruntled Farnum lead Jane to
the stairs. Jane, carrying the child, keeps secret her
suspicion she's dreaming. As they climb. Farnum observes to
her in a fierce whisper --

FARNUM
I've heard the stories Madam -- I
tell you that at flag-fall. You are
here on sufferance!

JANE
Kiss my ass.

-- then indicates the child with defensive propriety --

JANE
She don't understand English in case
you're wondering.

Below, in the lobby, Utter heads for the dining room himself --

CUT TO:

EXT. MAIN STREET - DAY

Bullock and Smith walking back --

REV. SMITH
I was a field nurse during the War,
at Shiloh and Second Manassas.
(beat)
That was a good deal of violence.

BULLOCK
Is that when you got your calling?

REV. SMITH
Yes it was Sir -- out of that
crucible. Out of all that horror, to
come to God's grace. "A man's heart
deviseth his way, but the Lord
directeth his steps."

Smith smiles at Bullock with a pained urgency --

REV. SMITH
He directeth all our steps Mr.
Bullock. All of us.

Bullock bridles slightly --

BULLOCK
If you're preaching at me Reverend
you need to put some more light on
the text.

REV. SMITH
If I'm preaching at you Sir I do you
a disservice.

They've reached the hardware tent. Star's waiting outside.
The tent's been partially dismantled in preparation for the
move to the new lot, and a good deal of the goods are packed
for easy transport --

REV. SMITH
Good morning Mr. Star.

STAR
'Morning Reverend.

BULLOCK
Did we get the lot? Can we start
building? The Reverend's come to
help.

STAR
(shakes his head no)
We're still hanging fire.

Bullock takes this in, his temper building --

BULLOCK
What's the damn hold-up?

STAR
New gambling outfit come into town
Seth -- time wasn't right to push
him to a decision.

BULLOCK
I got all the lumber cut.

STAR
And I warned you that was premature.

BULLOCK
You said ninety-eight percent after
your last conversation with that son-
of-a-bitch.

STAR
Ninety-eight is not a hundred.

A beat, then --

BULLOCK
Goddamnit.

Off which --

CUT TO:

INT. THE GEM - SWEARENGEN'S OFFICE - DAY

He's dressing --

SWEARENGEN
Cocksuckers.

Trixie's helping him --

SWEARENGEN
Where were they when Dan and me were
chopping trees in this gulch, hands
all blistered, buck-tooth fucking
beavers rolling around in the creek,
slapping their tales on the water
like we was hired entertainment.

TRIXIE
I'd've paid a nickel to see you chop
wood.

SWEARENGEN
Don't think I wasn't blow-for-blow
beside Dan. I can play that shit
when I have to.

He considers himself in the mirror Trixie holds up for him --

TIME CUT TO:

INT. THE BELLA UNION - DAY

Well along in its transformation, as observed by Swearengen,
just arrived, an image of sartorial finery. Eddie Sawyer and
Joanie Stubbs ride herd respectively on the set-up of gambling
equipment and facilities for prostitution. Tolliver,
supervising the whole, is first to note Swearengen --

SWEARENGEN
I guess this ain't a hotel no more.

STUBBS
Come see us tonight when we open --
we'll find you a place to lay down.

TOLLIVER
And someone to keep your feet warm.

Swearengen his hand to Tolliver --

SWEARENGEN
I'm Al Swearengen, my joint's across
the way.

SAWYER
The Gem?

SWEARENGEN
That's it.

TOLLIVER
Cy Tolliver, Al.

Shaking hands, Tolliver identifies his partners --

TOLLIVER
Ed Sawyer, Joanie Stubbs.

Swearengen shakes hands all around --

SWEARENGEN
You people must have trained with
the heathens, come upon us
unbeknownst.

Tolliver appears to take Swearengen's opening of this subject
as good-natured banter not requiring pursuit --

TOLLIVER
How long you been in camp Al?

SWEARENGEN
This time Cy since March -- I was
here last year too, but the fucking
cavalry drove us out.

TOLLIVER
Put all the whites out didn't they.

SWEARENGEN
Deep-fucking thinkers in Washington
put that policy together. This year
though, so many soldiers deserting
to prospect, they give the ghost up
and let us all back in. And o'course
Custer sorted out the fucking Sioux
for us, so now we're safe as at our
mothers' tits.

Tolliver and the others grin --

TOLLIVER
Did a job for our side, didn't he
Al?

SWEARENGEN
How about that fucking long-haired
blow-hard? I'll tell you this though
Cy -- and you can mark my fucking
words -- Crazy Horse winning at the
Little Big Horn bought his people
one long-term ass-fucking, 'cause
them Washington cocksuckers will now
be coming at 'em hard. You do not
want to be a dirt-worshiping heathen
from this point forward.

Swearengen can't tell if they're in his palm or he's in theirs --

SWEARENGEN
Anyways, here we are settling the
world's problems.
(rubs his mouth)
I'm wondering Cy -- you and me want
to talk about our areas of overlap?
So we're not at each other's throats?

TOLLIVER
Give me a for-instance Al.

SWEARENGEN
Women. Would we want to agree on
rates?

Tolliver defers to Stubbs, who addresses Swearengen in a
voice friendly and businesslike --

STUBBS
Far as pussy Al, we'll want to let
the market sort itself out.

SWEARENGEN
(to Tolliver)
Sounds to me like I'm up against
specialty acts. How about table-games,
avoiding overlap there?

Tolliver looks to Eddie Sawyer --

SAWYER
We'll be featuring craps Al --

SWEARENGEN
I played craps in Chicago. I don't
offer it myself -- gets these hoople-
heads confused.

Swearengen rubs his neck --

SWEARENGEN
So that's one overlap avoided. Now
what about faro?

SAWYER
We'll have it.

SWEARENGEN
Is that decision hard-and-fast?

Sawyer looks to Tolliver --

TOLLIVER
I just don't see overlap being a
problem Al, even where we duplicate.
We're offering different atmospheres.
You're a pioneer-type, a trailblazer
type, and you're going to draw a
trail-blazing element.

SWEARENGEN
Meaning I get the ones that don't
wash.

SAWYER
Must cut through the stink though
when they walk in with those sacks-
full of gold.

SWEARENGEN
Oh the money spends, definitely.

Swearengen resents being answered by an underling, looks
back to Tolliver, who gives him a big friendly smile --

TOLLIVER
Anyways, thanks for the neighborly
visit.

SWEARENGEN
Yeah, good to meet you, very good
luck to you. You're opening at eight,
huh?

SAWYER
That's what we're aiming at.

SWEARENGEN
Eight o'clock, good for you.

Swearengen turns, takes the long walk out, his gaze lingering
briefly on one of Tolliver's faro dealers. When Swearengen's
gone Tolliver looks to Eddie Sawyer, inviting his assessment
of their rival --

SAWYER
He wouldn't set a fire right away.

TOLLIVER
Come to cases though, he would set a
fire.

Tolliver offers this, not out of any sense of jeopardy, but
as an archaeologist might after enjoying an encounter,
stimulating to his imagination, with a relic of some precursor
civilization --

CUT TO:

INT. GRAND CENTRAL HOTEL - DINING ROOM - DAY

Hickok, Utter, and Brom --

HICKOK
'Way you tell it Mister, 'man didn't
sell you that claim holding a gun to
your head.

BROM
Frankly, Mr. Hickok, as a novice in
these matters I was duped. And now
the seller's disappeared.
(to Utter, irrelevantly)
You moved into his room.

UTTER
Sounds like you're up Shit's Creek.

BROM
(confiding)
The seller had accomplices, gentlemen,
men of what passes for position in
this place.
(to Hickok)
I'd pay handsome bounty if they were
brought to make restitution.

HICKOK
Sorry you lost your money Mister,
but I ain't for hire to rob it back.

BROM
I make no terms as to method.

HICKOK
You don't figure a good talking-to'd
do the trick.

Brom looks away, embarrassed but resolute --

BROM
I'm not leaving camp without my money.

UTTER
Mister, that fella you said had my
room before me?

BROM
A man named Tim Driscoll, yes. Pure
charlatan.

UTTER
Fresh stain on my floor when I moved
in. He may've checked out short a
useful amount of blood.

BROM
It wouldn't surprise me in the least.

UTTER
That'd make them accomplices you
were talking about dangerous people
to deal with.

BROM
Yes. I quite take your point. No
honor among thieves.
(to Hickok)
Thanks for your time. I'll pursue my
remedies in some other fashion.

Brom splits. Hickok looks to Utter --

HICKOK
I don't think he took your point,
quite.

UTTER
I think he quite missed it.

Hickok gets to his feet --

HICKOK
Believe I'll pass out Charlie.

UTTER
I guess you was playing poker all
night.

HICKOK
Yessir.

Utter's too worried about Hickok to try to accomplish a smooth
conversational transition --

UTTER
When we was coming into camp, Jane
and me seen that Montana fella you
seem to like --

HICKOK
(nods)
Bullock. He had my back again last
night.

UTTER
He was seeing to the result this
morning.

HICKOK
Man has an active conscience.

UTTER
What would you think of us and him
and his friend having dinner tonight?

HICKOK
Why?

UTTER
Why? People gotta eat, don't they
Bill?

HICKOK
True enough. Mark me down for a yes.

UTTER
And maybe you'd enjoy sitting with
someone 'wasn't looking to beat you
at cards or blow your head off.

Hickok moves off. Off Utter, watching his friend go with
futile concern --

CUT TO:

INT. THE GEM - SWEARENGEN'S OFFICE - DAY

Swearengen, silent at his desk. Before him, his minions.
After a beat ---

SWEARENGEN
What we're not going to do is set
any fucking fires. Not yet anyhow.

Swearengen rubs his neck --

SWEARENGEN
(to Farnum)
I want to know who did their leg
work.

FARNUM
You hit the nail square Al. Whoever
went-between them Bella Union people
and Artie Simpson would be a prime
source of information.

SWEARENGEN
Do not repeat back to me what I just
said in different fucking words.

A pregnant pause --

SWEARENGEN
And I want to know who cut the cheese.

All eyes are downcast --

SWEARENGEN
I'll tell you this much for openers --
we are setting off an arena on the
balcony, and God help whoever doesn't
use it, because the next stink I
have to smell in this office, that
person goes out the window into the
muck on their fucking heads and we'll
see how they like farting from that
position.

Swearengen begins to pace --

SWEARENGEN
"Can't we hurry and close on the lot
Mr. Swearengen." Wouldn't that be a
great fucking set-up, if they're all
of the same fucking party.

No one has the temerity to ask him to explain. He stops,
stares at them --

SWEARENGEN
Two days ago them hardware guys come
to camp, inside six hours people
start falling like bowling pins. Oh
and here's a coincidence -- Wild
Bill Hickok's got the one cocksucker's
back.

FARNUM
You think them hardware guys and
Hickok might be the advance party
for them saloon operators Al?

SWEARENGEN
You just did the same fucking thing
I told you not to.
(to Burns)
Get them two. Say I'm ready to
conclude on their offer.

BURNS
The hardware guys.

SWEARENGEN
Who the fuck do you think I'm talking
about?

BURNS
Here I go Al.

SWEARENGEN
Stop at Wu's on your way, tell that
cocksucker either he feeds his pigs
Persimmon Phil or tonight I serve
'em Raw Loin of Oriental.

BURNS
See I thought you forgot about that
Al, I thought that slipped between
the cracks.

Swearengen just stares at him. Burns is gone. Swearengen
looks to Irons --

SWEARENGEN
A faro dealer at that new joint's a
dope-fiend -- tall guy with a skanky
red beard...

IRONS
(eagerly)
Want me to get next to him Mr.
Swearengen? Let me take a few dollars --
I'll play at his table.

SWEARENGEN
Not that that fucking joint's open
yet, or that sending you out with
two dollars in your pocket I'd see
you back again till you were broke
and couldn't get no more credit from
whoever was filling up your pipe.
(as Irons looks down
shame-faced)
Stop hustling. I'll give you dope
when you bring the cocksucker back
here.

IRONS
He's as good as standing in front of
you Mr. Swearengen.

Irons is gone. Swearengen looks out the window, hates feeling
this vulnerable --

SWEARENGEN
Stick around. Help me measure where
their loyalties lie.

FARNUM
These hardware guys.

SWEARENGEN
You did it again.

Swearengen can't meet Farnum's eyes --

FARNUM
Sure Al.
(beat)
'Far as the other matter -- I haven't
passed gas in a public place since I
left Philadelphia at twelve.

Off the distracted Swearengen --

CUT TO:

INT. / EXT. BULLOCK AND STAR'S HARDWARE TENT - DAY

McCall, still drunk, ostensibly perusing their wares, is
near to falling asleep --

BULLOCK
Look at that jackass.

Star calls to him --

STAR
Help you with anything?

MCCALL
I'll tell you who's being done a
favor at this exact moment, or would
you like to guess? A favor in this
tent.

STAR
I'd guess it's you yourself Sir,
considering quality goods.

MCCALL
Favor here's being done for Wild
Bill Fucking Hickok.

Which prompts Bullock and irritates him --

BULLOCK
What're you talking about?

MCCALL
Because if I'm prospecting in the
hills, he's not getting his just
desserts, at a poker table or
otherwise -- and don't ask what I
mean by that last part.

Bullock's voice is level --

BULLOCK
What do you mean?

McCall smiles with drunken subtlety --

MCCALL
I said you'd do better not asking.

Bullock notes, behind McCall, the entrance of Charlie Utter --

BULLOCK
(to McCall)
Get out of here.

McCall's lost contact with Bullock, shows Star a sifting
cradle --

MCCALL
I'll buy this one. What's the price?

BULLOCK
You ain't buying nothing.

Some unseen principle deprives McCall of balance -- in
contorting to regain it he notes Utter behind him --

MCCALL
I know you. Where do I know you from?

UTTER
Can't help you with that Pardner.

It comes to McCall --

MCCALL
You follow him around...

Bullock grabs McCall at neck-nape and pants-seat and bum-
rushes him from the tent, heaves him face-down in the muck --

BULLOCK
That tent's shut to you -- don't
come back there.

Bullock goes back inside --

MCCALL
You got a favor being done you Mister,
if you know or not, or know or not
what it is.

Hearing no answer, McCall raises his face enough to blink,
prepares to collect himself --

MCCALL
Fuck you, and plans I may have had
to buy something --

He's got his hands in the muck for balance, begins to begin
to rise --

MCCALL
-- or prospect, or not settle that
fuckhead's account.

Utter's hat is in his hands; he watches Bullock resume his
place --

UTTER
(to Star)
I'd be lousy at retail, I guarantee
you that much. Wouldn't have patience
for it.

STAR
(indicates Bullock)
We're not sure how much future he's
got.

Utter scratches at the back of his neck --

UTTER
Anyways, I wanted to tell you fellas --
'several days I'll be going back to
Cheyenne.

Star and Bullock aren't sure what to make of this. Utter
plunges onward --

UTTER
I operate a freight business out of
there. If you need resupply I'll be
bringing several wagons back, 'far
as restocking your inventory.

STAR
That's good to know.

UTTER
Not drumming business up -- that's
not my purpose. I got all the business
I need. Just you seem like nice
fellas.

He looks like he wants to hang himself --

UTTER
And I was half-wondering too if you'd
want to join me and Bill for dinner.

STAR
Sure.

UTTER
Tonight or some other time.

BULLOCK
Let's do it tonight.

UTTER
Whatever's convenient.

BULLOCK
Sure.

For his friend's sake, having plumbed the core-resources of
his social skills, Utter stands now near befuddlement --

UTTER
I feel like I should've brought posies
with me.

Burns has come in --

STAR
Afternoon. Help you find something?

BURNS
Mr. Swearengen wants to see you.

Off which --

CUT TO:

INT. GRAND CENTRAL HOTEL - GARRETS' ROOM/HALLWAY - DAY

Alma sits at her dressing table, watching Brom stew --

BROM
The burden falls on me Alma. That
much now is clear.

ALMA
Mr. Hickok left no possibility he
might reconsider?

BROM
None. Nor was I sure that if he'd
agreed the man before me at that
breakfast table was equal to the
task.

He paces --

ALMA
Make me only one promise then Brom.

BROM
Don't ask me to amend my purpose --

ALMA
That before seeing Mr. Swearengen
you take your walk.

He ponders this --

BROM
To clear my head and reflect.

ALMA
If only to perfect your arguments.

BROM
I see.

He searches her eyes with all the seriousness he's capable
of --

BROM
I accept this suggestion, out of
feeling for its author.

She smooths the curl at his forehead --

ALMA
Thank you.

He opens the door --

BROM
If I'm stooped when next you see me
it won't be worry weighing me down
but the bags of our recovered gold.

ALMA
Take your walk Dear.

He leaves. Alma postpones getting high, believing she may
have seen at the door of the room across the hall, which is
also opened a crack, another female eye. She widens slightly
her door's aperture. The woman behind the other door does
the same. Their eyes meet, hold an irrefutable beat before
the other woman slams her door closed. Alma again defers
going for her dope, peers further into the hallway, sees
Brom at its far end contemplating Hickok's supine form. A
husband's preternatural sense of coming suddenly under his
wife's scrutiny prompts Brom to raise his head and turn --

BROM
It's Hickok, Alma, unconscious.

ALMA
I see.

BROM
I take this for proof my reservations
were well-grounded.

Now she does need to get high. Closes the door. Brom notes
her disappearance, starts at a snore from Hickok, sets off --

INT. GRAND CENTRAL HOTEL - HICKOK'S ROOM - CONTINUOUS

Jane sits on a chair beside the bed, watching the little
girl sleep --

JANE
Too considerate to disturb us,
wouldn't have truck with that room-
clerk ghoul to get let in to
Charlie's. Rather sleep in the fucking
hallway -- that's the kind of man he
is.

Jane realizes she's said "fuck", but remorse has all but
lost its sting --

JANE
I owe you another fucking penny. Owe
you another one.

Jane changes the compress on the child's head --

JANE
I don't know if you ever should learn
English. Never mind foul -- spare
you knowing how ignorant people are.

Her hand lingers on her there gratefully --

JANE
But then I could tell you about Bill,
sleeping in the hallway out of thought
for others. And I know some other
fucking stories too. Owe you another
penny.

Off which --

INT. GRAND CENTRAL HOTEL - GARRETS' ROOM - CONTINUOUS

Alma, at the window, having already taken her first draught
of laudanum, and while squeezing replenishment of the opiate,
drop after drop, into a water-glass, considers with
luxuriating indolence the puny affairs of men as pursued on
the street below. As distorted by the liquid, she sees through
the glass and a spasm of guilt forces her to focus upon --

ALMA'S POV - BROM

-- having finished his first circuit of the camp, pausing
now outside the Gem. Alma watches Brom's effort at marshaling
resolve to enter Swearengen's saloon, and the faltering of
his will, returns her attention to the liquid as he moves on --

CUT TO:

INT. THE GEM - SALOON - DAY

Bullock, Star and Swearengen; b.g., Dority and Farnum --

SWEARENGEN
(more or less to Star)
I only hope you understand me being
short with you out on the street
this morning.

STAR
You had a lot on your mind.

SWEARENGEN
I had a lot on what's left of my
fucking mind, these new interests
coming in, and I hope you see now
what my thinking was yesterday not
selling that lot to you outright.

BULLOCK
What's your thinking today?

SWEARENGEN
(to Star, re Bullock)
Gets dead-center to the fucking point,
which I like in most situations.

Star's warning glance prompts from Bullock a nod which means
to be acquiescent but impresses as only provisional --

SWEARENGEN
(to Star)
Do you know those new saloon
interests? Are you acquainted with
'em at all?

STAR
No.

BULLOCK
Not them and not Bill Hickok, and
all we want to do is run a hardware
business.

Swearengen studies Bullock --

SWEARENGEN
I've got to be satisfied. You
understand? And I'm the type simple
cocksucker that when he sees lightning
readies for thunder, and takes the
thunder if it comes for part of the
same fucking storm...

STAR
Why wouldn't you Mr. Swearengen?

SWEARENGEN
Thank you for saying that even if
you don't fucking mean it.

BULLOCK
What would make you comfortable
selling to us?

Swearengen's glance in Farnum's direction puts the hotel
operator on notice to check Swearengen's thinking --

SWEARENGEN
A thousand, with right of first
refusal on any further sale.

Unobtrusively, Farnum nods approval of Swearengen's move --

STAR
Accepted.

SWEARENGEN
Right to buy back at the original
sale price plus the cost of your
improvements.

Farnum nods that Swearengen's on a roll --

STAR
Accepted.

Swearengen's got his confidence back --

SWEARENGEN
No gambling on the fucking premises,
or no association of any sort with
these Bella Union cocksuckers.

STAR
Accepted.

BULLOCK
We can't sell 'em our goods?

SWEARENGEN
No -- what do you think of that?

STAR
Accepted.

SWEARENGEN
(to Bullock)
What do you think?

BULLOCK
Accepted.

-- so much so, that, reassured further by Bullock's
capitulation, he softens these Draconian terms --

SWEARENGEN
Or what they'd buy in the normal
course of your normal fucking business
I guess'd be okay to transact, with
these cocksuckers.

BULLOCK
We can sell 'em our wares.

SWEARENGEN
Your normal fucking wares. No
gambling, whoring or whiskey on the
fucking premises, is the chief fucking
point.

STAR
Accepted.

Star offers his hand in agreement --

SWEARENGEN
I spit in my hand, will that drive
you screaming into the Hills?

Star and Swearengen spit, shake hands. Bullock and Swearengen
do the same, watching each other carefully --

SWEARENGEN
The thousand'd be nice.

Star's already produced a billfold from which he begins to
extract currency. Swearengen nods to Farnum that it's okay
for Farnum to go --

FARNUM
Happy outcome.

He waves valediction to Swearengen, heading for the door.
Off Swearengen, as the bills accumulate before him --

CUT TO:

EXT. THE GEM - DAY

Utter's waiting outside the Gem for Bullock and Star. The
huckster's pitching him an idea --

HUCKSTER
A shooting exhibition --

Charlie's approached by deep-thinkers like this in every
camp he and Hickok hit --

UTTER
That idea for Mr. Hickok's been had
and acted on by a few people before
you.

Utter notes Farnum b.g. exiting The Gem. The more Farnum
attempts to navigate the thoroughfare as a man without qualm
of conscience, the more his movement becomes sheepish and
surreptitious. Finally, far b.g., he ostentatiously plants
himself as the equivalent of a window-shopper at the
establishment beside the Bella Union. During all of which,
the Huckster embellishes his proposal with compounded
enthusiasm --

HUCKSTER
-- but, then, afterward, we dig out
the bullets out of the tree and sell
the fucking bullets --

UTTER
Uh-huh.

HUCKSTER
-- and the fucking playing cards he
used as targets. That's the part I
was coming to.

UTTER
How about the tree-bark behind the
fucking playing-card targets.

HUCKSTER
Hell yes we'll sell the fucking bark.

Utter's grateful to note Star and Bullock come out of The
Gem --

UTTER
What do you say, fellas?

STAR
We got our lot Mr. Utter.

UTTER
Well hooray for you boys.

HUCKSTER
(to Utter)
Two days I can get the word out. Ten
cents to watch and we'll charge for
the souvenirs --

UTTER
I ain't going to take you up on it
Mister.

HUCKSTER
(lower)
There's twenty for you on the quiet.

UTTER
No, and the talk between us is over.

Utter's eyes have gone cold. The Huckster moves off, eyes on
the beckoning future --

HUCKSTER
Soap with a prize inside!

UTTER
(to Star, re Swearengen)
So you got that man to sell.

STAR
Never had to strain so to spend a
thousand dollars.

BULLOCK
(to Utter)
Will you and Mr. Hickok excuse us
from dinner?

UTTER
(visibly disappointed)
You'd as soon not do it, huh?

BULLOCK
We'd like to get to building.

STAR
Will we see you for breakfast
tomorrow?

UTTER
Sure. We might even catch Bill coming
back from cards. Anyways,
congratulations to the both of you
and good luck.

STAR
Thanks Mr. Utter.

BULLOCK
Thank you.

Bullock and Star watch as the older man sets off for the
Grand Central Hotel, and E.B. Farnum, having satisfied himself
he's bored to stupefaction anyone who might've been watching
him, skulks into the Bella Union saloon --

CUT TO:

INT. THE BELLA UNION - DAY

Farnum enters, wanders among the workers without apparent
aim or purpose, a shy and shambling bumpkin --

FARNUM
My goodness. My heavens. My goodness
gracious.

The work continues apace. Farnum arrives at a craps table
whose installation Eddie Sawyer supervises. He raises his
voice a little --

FARNUM
Heavens to Betsy.

This draws Sawyer's attention. He considers Farnum with a
show of patronizing urbanity --

SAWYER
What do you think Hiram? -- ever
seen a craps layout?

FARNUM
My first.

SAWYER
Shall I show you how it works?

FARNUM
I might could follow. I do read and
cipher.

SAWYER
Well you're well in advance of the
pack.

Under which Sawyer's steered Farnum to a second table, fully
installed but unattended, points to an inscription on its
felt --

SAWYER
Tell me what this says.

FARNUM
"P-A-S-S" says "pass".

SAWYER
You can read, can't you.

FARNUM
I wasn't raised to lie.

Farnum now lowers his voice --

FARNUM
I'm liable to be killed Eddie. He's
on my scent and closing.

-- while Sawyer pantomimes movements which would suggest to
an observer that he's explaining the inscriptions on the
felt --

SAWYER
Curious tactics coming here then,
E.B.

Farnum's whisper is an angry hiss --

FARNUM
To remind you secrecy is of the
essence! That's a dangerous man. Let
him doubt those he's trusted, this
camp'll run red with blood.

Sawyer receives this with more seriousness than his tone
admits --

SAWYER
Argues for raising your room-rates.
'Least make the game worth the candle.

FARNUM
I wonder how cavalier your attitude'll
be if a pig starts gnawing through
your vitals.

Sawyer distributes chips on the layout as if demonstrating
possible wagers --

SAWYER
Bet on me screaming for mercy.

FARNUM
Turned down your offer to buy and
pointed you to Artie Simpson -- whole
damned extent of my involvement, and
I'm staring straight at extinction.

Smiling affably, Sawyer puts his last stack of chips on "Don't
Come" --

SAWYER
He may get you anyway E.B. -- but if
your nerve goes he'll get you sure.

Off which --

CUT TO:

INT. THE GEM - SALOON - DAY

Dority's behind the bar. Burns approaches, produces several
sheets of paper on which have been painstakingly inscribed a
series of inscrutable drawings --

BURNS
Give me a fresh eye on these Dan.

Dority examines the first of the sketches --

BURNS
Plans for Al's platform.

Under which Jimmy Irons enters, leading upstairs the red-
bearded faro-dealer Swearengen saw at The Bella Union --

BURNS
This one's a lot of construction,
extending the balcony over the alley --

Burns shuffles the sheets --

BURNS
-- but if you just add a leverage
post, the boys'll be farting right
outside Al's window.

Dority considers him --

DORITY
I'd wait till he came back to me,
then show Al the alternatives.

BURNS
(relieved)
Let him make the choice.

DORITY
If he ever came back I'd show Al I
did the work and then I'd leave it
up to him.

Burns' nod affirms Dority's and trumps it with a wink --

DORITY
Watch the bar for me?

BURNS
Go do what you've got to do.

Dority does. Off Burns --

CUT TO:

INT. THE GEM - SWEARENGEN'S OFFICE - DAY

Standing beside Jimmy Irons is Leon, the red-bearded dope-
fiend faro-dealer --

SWEARENGEN
Get along with me, only dope problem
you'll have in this camp is not
walking loopy into the ass-end of
horses or passing out in feed-troughs.

LEON
Jimmy said you'd do right by me Mr.
Swearengen.

SWEARENGEN
Safe's open Jimmy, get Leon here
some of that dope.

IRONS
Yes sir.

SWEARENGEN
(to Leon, re Jimmy)
Hear his voice tremble? -- he's
thinking, "My God, how long's the
safe been open?"

IRONS
(chuckles uneasily)
'Never crossed my mind Mr. Swearengen.

Irons has collected the opium, hands it to Swearengen, who
breaks off a tarry black piece --

SWEARENGEN
(to Leon)
Dope's not my own preferred form of
relaxation but I did sample this
shit and believe me I nearly
converted.

LEON
I look forward to trying it Mr.
Swearengen.

All this time, Swearengen's interest is drawn outside to the
affronting structure across the way --

SWEARENGEN
Everything that goes on at the place.

LEON
I'll give you a daily rundown.

SWEARENGEN
Yeah, that'll be convenient for the
both of us.

At this moment Swearengen apprehends a form slinking with
accustomed stealth from The Bella Union toward its lair at
the Grand Central Hotel; stares at the creature with a forming
intuition...

SWEARENGEN
Here's the type I'd want to know
about...
(points)
Just left your joint, the Judas-goat-
looking fella...

Leon comes to the window --

SWEARENGEN
See him? Coyote-moving type --

Swearengen's palms suddenly frame the dope-fiend's skull at
the temples, guiding Leon's gaze with a fierce pedagogical
pressure --

SWEARENGEN
See him?

It's as if Swearengen is forcing his own gaze to focus --

LEON
(winces)
The short guy.

SWEARENGEN
Yeah. With his paws always damp like
a just-shit fucking turd.

-- asking himself "could I have missed danger so close?" He
makes himself let go of Leon's head --

SWEARENGEN
That's the type I'd want to know
about, comings and goings and any
dealings with your bosses.

LEON
I'll keep a special eye on him.

Leon flexes his jaw and optic muscles --

TRIXIE (O.S.)
Al?

Swearengen addressed the closed door --

SWEARENGEN
What?

TRIXIE (O.S.)
That Cherry New York Dude's downstairs
asking for you.

SWEARENGEN
No good. Jolly him the fuck out.

TRIXIE (O.S.)
He's talking about the Pinkertons.

Off Swearengen --

CUT TO:

INT. THE GEM - SALOON - DAY

Descending the stairs, Swearengen calls out to Brom --

SWEARENGEN
Dan Dority thought you were dead.

BROM
Yes, I didn't go to the claim this
morning. I chose not to.

SWEARENGEN
You should've let him know, I've had
him in tears here the last several
hours.
(calls O.S.)
Dan!

Dority emerges from a back room --

SWEARENGEN
Look Dan! --
(indicates Brom)
He's alive!

BROM
(to Dority)
Yes, I chose not to go to the claim.

SWEARENGEN
Whiskey Brom? Snatch?

BROM
Frankly Al, I'm here to speak to
you, and I'm not to be distracted.

SWEARENGEN
Proceed then My Son. Speak frankly.

BROM
We needn't reach the question of
whether my claim has "pinched out",
as the saying goes, or whether it
was a sham proposition to begin with.
Let's just say I've lost faith in
the property.

SWEARENGEN
Have you.

BROM
And I want my twenty thousand dollars
back.

SWEARENGEN
In the heat you've confused me with
Tim Driscoll.

BROM
I think that we are both aware Al
that Tim Driscoll's no longer in
camp. And because I believe you
colluded with Driscoll, and perhaps
were in cahoots with other parties
as well, I require satisfaction from
you.

SWEARENGEN
It's the heat again Brom. I don't
collude and I don't cahoot.

BROM
Al, are you familiar with the
Pinkerton Agency?

Swearengen stares at him, rubbing his nose --

SWEARENGEN
Why?

BROM
In pursuing its business interests
my family's had several occasions to
engage the Pinkertons. We maintain
friendly relations. I'd prefer we
two settle this as gentlemen, but if
need be, the Pinkertons can be made
party to our dispute.

SWEARENGEN
(to Dority)
Has he reconnoitered the rims with
you at all?

DORITY
Never.

SWEARENGEN
Did he ask to and you refused?

Dority shakes his head no --

DORITY
We hadn't got to it Al -- I assumed
he was in for the long haul.

BROM
What are you talking about
specifically?

SWEARENGEN
The gold you found washed down from
somewheres. That's the law of gravity.
Your claim runs rim to rim the width
of the fucking gulch. That means the
original deposit the gold you found
washed down from is likely on your
claim. Above, near one of the rims.

BROM
That's what you feel I should
reconnoiter.

SWEARENGEN
It's the first thing the Pinkertons'll
do, I promise you that much.
(to Dority)
Or am I fucking wrong?

DORITY
No that's how they operate.

SWEARENGEN
(to Dority)
If he wanted would you reconnoiter
with him?

DORITY
I was waiting for him out there all
morning Al.

SWEARENGEN
Is that a yes or a no?

DORITY
Yes, I'm happy to reconnoiter with
him.

BROM
(to Swearengen)
And if Dan's and my good-faith
reconnoitering doesn't show the source
of the gold, do you then make
restitution Al? Or do I have recourse
to the Agency?

SWEARENGEN
All right, yes, if at that point you
ask, I'll make restitution...

A lethal mirth at the corners of Swearengen's eyes --

SWEARENGEN
Rights and wrongs aside, because you
got me by the fucking balls.

BROM
Fine then.

-- stands his ground a self-satisfied instant longer before
walking out. Swearengen looks to Dority --

SWEARENGEN
Make it look like an accident.

Off which --

CUT TO:

INT. GRAND CENTRAL HOTEL - SECOND FLOOR HALLWAY - DAY

At several steps remove from Hickok's sleeping form, Utter
and Jane whisper in fierce colloquy --

UTTER
Ain't this a pretty picture.

JANE
I can't remedy what I don't know
about.

UTTER
Passed out in a public hallway.

Under which Brom Garret ascends to the second floor --

JANE
He never knocked on the damn door.
'Time I looked out he was already
snoring. Did you want me to drag him
in by the damn heels?

HICKOK
I say leave him where he is and go
about your own business.

Hickok's eyes stay closed. Jane looks to Utter --

JANE
He's up. I hope you're happy.
Congratulations cocksucker.

Scrupulous to avoid what he takes to be a private drama,
Brom knocks on his door and stares at it rigidly. Utter
addresses the closed-eyed Hickok even as he allows himself a
last fulminating look at Jane --

UTTER
Dinner's canceled Bill.

HICKOK
All right.

UTTER
Those two fellas got their lot bought
and they're starting right ahead
with the building.

HICKOK
Sure.

Alma admits Brom to their room --

JANE
I was that shocked seeing you sleeping
out here Bill. First saw you maybe
an hour ago.
(to Utter, re Hickok)
Didn't want to disturb me or the
child Charlie, why he must've sought
entry to your room. Wherever the
fuck you were at.

UTTER
I'd like to know where the goddamn
inn-keep was. He could've let Bill
in.

HICKOK
You're not going to let me sleep,
are you?

Hickok's tone has more tolerance in it than anger. He opens
his eyes --

JANE
I'd've let you sleep as long as you
wanted Bill.

HICKOK
How's that Little One?

JANE
Good, she's napping. More'n I can
say for you.

Hickok sits up --

HICKOK
(to Utter)
Was those hardware boys looking for
extra hands?

Utter decides to lie --

UTTER
(nods)
Inquiring in a roundabout way.

Off which --

CUT TO:

INT. GRAND CENTRAL HOTEL - GARRETS' ROOM - DAY

Brom ponders modifying his mining outfit --

BROM
I think leather boots rather than
rubber, given the terrain.

ALMA
I don't agree with this plan.

BROM
Reconnoitering the rims is exactly
the sort of due diligence Father
will ask if I've done.

ALMA
Nor do I see the need to involve
your father.

BROM
It was my mention of the Pinkertons
Alma which brought Al Swearengen
around, and the Pinkertons can't
come into this unless Father does as
well. I wouldn't even know where to
look for them.

ALMA
Oughtn't we possibly to take a
different view of all this Brom? --
consider we've had an adventure
costing twenty thousand dollars and
let matters rest there?

BROM
Let them rest?

ALMA
Yes. If you wish to see more of the
West let's leave now and see it, or
else return to New York. I don't
think we should linger here.

BROM
I have no abiding affection for this
camp Alma, but I won't leave without
my money.

He's dressed and ready for adventure. Notes Alma preparing a
draught of laudanum --

BROM
Why do you take that medicine?

The words seem to escape from him --

ALMA
You know why. To relieve my headaches.

BROM
The other day I had a whopper of a
headache and I sampled a bit. I'd
hardly call the dull, numbed, floating
feeling I experienced "relief".

His tone is uneasy and reproachful, as if, before addressing
his suspicion she'd taken a lover, she'd inconsiderately
forced him openly to expose his fear. She knows how to head
off this subject --

ALMA
Perhaps the sexes experience the
medicine differently.

She watches as, at the mention of sex, her husband colors
and turns away --

BROM
In any case, I hope you feel better.

ALMA
Thank you.

He's gone. Off Alma --

TIME CUT TO:

EXT. MAIN STREET - NIGHT

Standing sentry on his second-floor balcony, Swearengen
watches the last preparations for The Bella Union's opening.
Hears behind him --

FARNUM (O.S.)
I'll tell you what Al -- you've got
a hell of a nice turnout downstairs.
Hell of a Monday crowd.

SWEARENGEN
E.B.

He turns, considers Farnum affably --

SWEARENGEN
Thanks for coming.

INT. THE GEM - SWEARENGEN'S OFFICE - CONTINUOUS

-- Farnum's been brought by Johnny Burns --

FARNUM
Whistle and I'm underfoot. Loyal's a
damn dog.

Swearengen's gaze returns to the street at the sound of
gunfire. Four employees empty their six-shooters into the
air as Cy Tolliver throws The Bella Union's doors open to
admit a considerable waiting crowd. Even as he addresses
Burns, Swearengen's eyes never leave the scene across the
street --

SWEARENGEN
(to Burns)
What's the post for in the fart-area?

BURNS
Leverage. Should I take it down?

Swearengen shakes his head no --

SWEARENGEN
Give me and E.B. some privacy.

Off which --

CUT TO:

EXT. MAIN STREET - NIGHT

At the lot formerly housing the barber's tent, Bullock,
Hickok, Utter and Star put hammer to nail building the new
hardware store. A kibitzer engages Hickok --

MAN #1
I'll tell you this much Wild Bill,
and I'd say the same to the angels
in heaven -- as a stage performer,
you cannot act a single damn lick.

Hickok appears to have made peace long ago with uninvited
familiarities --

HICKOK
I call that a fair judgment.

MAN #1
I saw you on stage in Hartford
Connecticut and I'd've bet U.S.
currency you'd been strangled and
killed and just didn't know you was
dead yet.

HICKOK
(to Bullock)
Was you born patient Montana, or did
you cultivate it?

BULLOCK
I guess I'm patient for labor.

HICKOK
(grins)
Back-and-forth with your fellow man
don't have as much charm for your?

BULLOCK
(grins too)
Not as much.

A second man engages the first --

MAN #2
Why tell him that type story?

MAN #1
I saw him perform with Buffalo Bill
Cody and Texas Jack Omohundro on the
stage in Hartford Connecticut.

MAN #2
Who gives a fuck? You think he was
put on earth to hear you run him
down?

HICKOK
I'm all right men.

MAN #2
(to Man #1)
Now why don't you get out of my sight
before I do something I'll fucking
regret.

The first man starts walking away --

MAN #1
I'll tell whatever kind of story I
feel like telling.

MAN #2
That's right -- tell it walking!

The first man's gone --

BULLOCK
Anyways, Sol and me are sure grateful
you and Mr. Utter taking the time to
help.

MAN #2
Go ahead about your work Mr. Hickok,
he won't bother you no more.

Hickok ignores the man --

HICKOK
(to Bullock, wry)
Charlie encourages me being in your
company. He feels you're a positive
influence.

MAN #2
No reason you'd remember me, but I
saw you Marshal in Abilene -- saw
you blow one cocksucker's head right
the fuck off his neck...

Hickok looks away, plainly losing patience --

MAN #2
I also saw you dead-center three
bullets on an ace of spades playing
card at twenty-five goddamn paces.

UTTER
We're working here friend.

MAN #2
(to Hickok)
Some other loudmouth like this
loudmouth I just sorted out said
you'd doctored that playing card
before you ever tacked it to that
tree.

HICKOK
And did you sort him out too?

MAN #2
You're goddamn right.

HICKOK
Well thanks for all those efforts,
but now it's time you moved along.

MAN #2
Sorted him out proper -- gouged out
the both of his fucking eyes.

UTTER
All right Friend.

MAN #2
All right what? Who was talking to
you?

HICKOK
Move along. I'm tired listening to
you.

MAN #2
You're tired of listening?

BULLOCK
That's what he said.

MAN #2
I guess everyone's talking to me
now.

HICKOK
Get the fuck out of here.

MAN #2
All right. I hear you Wild Bill. My
hearing ain't impaired like your
sight's supposed to be. You don't
need to insult me twice.

He's moving away --

MAN #2
I'll tell you what -- I hope you get
what's coming to you, and sooner
rather than later. I hope they sort
you out and I get to see it. I hope
you're gut-shot and die slow. I hope
they get you in this camp.

The man's gone. Utter looks to Star --

UTTER
Throw me some more of them nails.
(to Hickok)
You need nails Bill?

Hickok disengages from the building --

HICKOK
(to Bullock)
I'm going to desert you. Play some
poker and drink some whiskey.

BULLOCK
Thanks for your help.

HICKOK
See you later Charlie.

UTTER
All right Bill.

Off which --

CUT TO:

INT. THE GEM - SWEARENGEN'S OFFICE - NIGHT

Swearengen's gazing out the window, eyes fixed on the lot
where Hickok is assisting the building of the hardware store.
He gesture theatrically to Farnum --

SWEARENGEN
For having nothing to do with him,
those hardware cocksuckers sure seem
joined to Hickok at the hip.

FARNUM
You made your judgment on that Al,
and I believe you judged correct.

SWEARENGEN
No connection with Hickok, or between
any of 'em and them new saloon people.

FARNUM
You saw it like that and I did too,
to the best of the both of our
thinking.

SWEARENGEN
Which was important to me.

FARNUM
Which was?

SWEARENGEN
What?

FARNUM
When you said "which was", I didn't
follow what you were asking.

SWEARENGEN
I wasn't asking nothing. I was
saying, because I didn't have full
information, your impression on this
was important. Of someone I could
trust.

By now, Farnum's hands are dripping with perspiration. He
takes out a rag and dries them --

SWEARENGEN
What's wrong?

FARNUM
My palms are damp.

SWEARENGEN
Your palms are always damp.

FARNUM
Yes.

SWEARENGEN
So is something wrong?

FARNUM
No.

Off which --

CUT TO:

EXT. ELLSWORTH'S CLAIM - NIGHT

He's sitting at the cooking fire, notes at a distance Brom
Garret and Dan Dority climbing toward the top of Brom's claim --

ELLSWORTH
(to the dog)
The Great Prospector's found his
second wind. Unless he's getting
blowed along.

Off which --

CUT TO:

INT. THE GEM - SWEARENGEN'S OFFICE - NIGHT

Neither Swearengen or Farnum's moved or even blinked --

FARNUM
You tell me what's wrong Al. Have
you a doubt of misgiving? You tell
me.

SWEARENGEN
Generally, with my misgivings or
doubts, I go ahead and kill the mother-
fucker I have doubts or misgivings
about.

Farnum knows he's playing for his life --

FARNUM
But these are special circumstances.

Swearengen considers him --

SWEARENGEN
I don't know what you mean by special
circumstances. If I want to, I can
burn the whole fucking camp down.

FARNUM
Yes you can.

SWEARENGEN
Cut your throat first and then burn
down the whole fucking camp.

FARNUM
You can, that's right.

SWEARENGEN
So I don't know what the fuck you
mean.

FARNUM
I mean, short of burning it all down,
you got to trust someone.

A beat, then --

SWEARENGEN
What were you doing over there?

FARNUM
Where?

Swearengen stares at him --

FARNUM
At The Bella Union?

The instant the words are past his lips he knows he's erred,
quickly offers --

FARNUM
Gathering impressions. Scouting.

-- knows he's still in error and almost out of chances --

FARNUM
Listen to me. Listen to me. I was
the go-between. It was me. But without
malicious intention.

CLOSE ON SWEARENGEN --

CUT TO:

EXT. CLAIM NUMBER NINE ABOVE DISCOVERY - NIGHT

Brom and Dority, attaining the summit at The Gulch's eastern
rim. The disappointment Brom knows he ought to feel at not
having found more gold is subsumed by his pride at having
made the climb --

BROM
I'll confess to being winded.

Sees Dority come for him --

BROM
Oh Dan, no --

-- struggles, moaning with juvenile terror --

BROM
Mother.

-- as Dority pushes him from the rim --

CUT TO:

INT. THE GEM - SWEARENGEN'S OFFICE - NIGHT

-- as if, in his extremity, supplanting the fear which has
governed his every breath, the hotel operator has been
suffused by Sawyer's admonition against loss of nerve --

FARNUM
Simple greed. One less hotel in camp.
Shorten up the room-supply. No
conspiracy, and no betrayal.
(beat)
If you're going to murder me, I'd
appreciate a quick dying and not
getting 'et by the pigs, 'case there's
Resurrection of The Flesh.

A beat, then --

SWEARENGEN
Stay friendly with them cocksuckers.

Swearengen walks past Farnum, out of his office. Farnum hears
the door slam, realizes he's saved. All of his character
defects return --

FARNUM
With them Bella Union people?

Off which --

CUT TO:

EXT. BOTTOM OF THE GULCH - NIGHT

Dority, descending from the rim to reach the spot where Brom
has fallen, comes upon a gold outcropping, begins, amazed,
to trace its extent. Hears Brom moan. Covers the outcropping
with brush, moves to Brom's fallen form. He's nearly dead.
Crouching, Dority raises Brom's head by the forelock, snaps
his face down on a rock, killing him --

NEW ANGLE - ELLSWORTH

watching, holding the dog, his hand over its mouth --

CUT TO:

INT. GRAND CENTRAL HOTEL - HICKOK'S ROOM - NIGHT

Jane and the Metz child. The child watches her. Jane feels
her forehead for the hundredth time --

JANE
If he comes, I'm going to move you
to that nice palette only 'cause he's
far too big for it and so would I
be. So if you wake up on the palette
that's what happened. And him and me
being where we are is the
circumstances of the room, period,
and the grownups are just sleeping.
But don't be afraid to wake me up.
All right, Sweetheart, close your
eyes.

Jane takes her hand to her own face, moves her palm over her
eyes to show the child it's time to go to sleep --

JANE
Go ahead Child, I'm right here.

The Child closes her eyes to show Jane she understands, opens
them again to see if Jane has recognized her purpose. Jane
nods, smiles --

JANE
Go ahead.

As the Child closes her eyes again --

CUT TO:

INT. THE BELLA UNION - SALOON - NIGHT

Full-swing. Tolliver watches from across the room as a small
crowd has gathered to watch Hickok play poker. A Player
approaches him --

PLAYER
When it was a hotel this morning I
was tossed out of this place on my
ass.

TOLLIVER
Wasn't on our watch Sir, and I hope
you got a compensation chit.

PLAYER
The chit was a nice fucking touch --

TOLLIVER
Have two more --

PLAYER
(taken with his own
wit)
I may apply these toward a nice touch
of fucking.

TOLLIVER
All right now.

The Player's about to move off --

PLAYER
Wild Bill Hickok over there.

TOLLIVER
I believe that's him. And the snatch
is over in this direction.

Tolliver points the way, and the Player follows it. Joanie
Stubbs has joined Tolliver. They consider Hickok across the
room --

STUBBS
Tina or Molly can be quiet, if you
want him kept company.

TOLLIVER
That man's already doing all he wants
to.

She nods, agreeing --

TOLLIVER
If I sent him anyone it'd be you.

She smiles, moving off. Tolliver considers the room while
drifting toward the faro table manned by Leon the dope-fiend --

TOLLIVER
Are you loaded Leon?

LEON
Well on the path Mr. Tolliver. That
man at The Gem's got some serious
shit.

Sawyer's joined them --

TOLLIVER
I know when you make your first report
on us to him you'll remember to say
thanks.

SAWYER
I hope you're not too fucked-up to
deal seconds for us Leon.

LEON
The opium ain't made yet Mr. Sawyer
that can fuck me up that bad.

TOLLIVER
Atta boy.

Off Tolliver's POV of Hickok across the room --

CUT TO:

INT. THE GEM - SWEARENGEN'S BEDROOM - NIGHT

Swearengen and Trixie in bed. Swearengen's sitting up. His
gaze is fixed, inscrutable --

SWEARENGEN
Trust. That's a great way to operate.
Learn all the ins and outs of getting
killed.
(beat)
Every fucking beating I'm grateful
for. Every fucking one. Get it all
beat out of you, then you know what
the fucking world is.

A knock at the door is followed by a loud whisper --

DORITY (O.S.)
It's Dan Al, better open up.

SWEARENGEN
(to Trixie)
Let him in.

Swearengen sits up a little more as Trixie rises. She puts
on her nightgown, admits Dority, walks out onto the balcony.
Dority comes beside Swearengen, squats to confide --

DORITY
It's a mixed report Al.

Swearengen nods Dority in closer --

CLOSE ON THEIR LIPS --

SWEARENGEN
Just tell me is it done.

DORITY
It's done. He's gone.

INTERCUT WITH:

EXT. MAIN STREET - THE GEM/GRAND CENTRAL HOTEL - NIGHT

Trixie, on the balcony, looks across the thoroughfare, meets
the eyes of Alma Garret, keeping watch for her husband at
the window of her hotel room --

RESUME - SWEARENGEN AND DORITY - EXTREME CLOSE-UP

SWEARENGEN
What's the mixture?

DORITY
He went owning a hell of a fucking
gold strike.

Off which --

FADE OUT.


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