"PORTRAIT OF JENNIE"

Screenplay by

Paul Osborn, Peter Berneis, Ben Hecht

and David O. Selznick

Based on a novel by

Robert Nathan

Adapted by

Leonardo Bercovici

1947

SHOOTING DRAFT



FADE IN:

1. A HIGH SHOT OF THE NEW YORK SKYLINE

DISSOLVE TO:

2. EXTERIOR METROPOLITAN MUSEUM - DAY

It is a cold wintry day and, although there is no snow, an
icy wind whips around the building.

DISSOLVE TO:

3. INSERT - METROPOLITAN MUSEUM NAME PLATE

Superimposed over this is the following legend:

(To be supplied)

DISSOLVE TO:

4. INTERIOR METROPOLITAN MUSEUM - LONG SHOT - ONE OF THE
ROOMS

We see a group of children -- about ten years of age --
standing before one of the paintings. It is obviously a class.
A middle-aged woman is lecturing to them.

CAMERA GOES CLOSER and we see the woman and children more
closely. The woman -- Miss Spinney -- seems remote and far
away -- her lecture for the most part a cold recital of facts.

CAMERA PANS UP TO A CLOSE SHOT OF THE PAINTING - "CARDINAL
NINO DE GUEVARA" -

SPINNEY
Cardinal Nino de Guevara -- painted
by El Greco around 1596. El Greco is
of the Spanish school -- although he
was really a Greek. That is what El
Greco means -- "The Greek." El Greco
cared nothing for the charms of the
flesh --
(suddenly she catches
herself, hesitates
and hurries on)
That is -- I mean -- I mean he was
only interested in -- well -- in the
spirit of a person. For example, in
this painting he didn't try to make
the man look just pretty -- he tried
to show us what the man thought and
felt -- what the man's spirit was!

ROMANTIC LITTLE GIRL
Was he a real Cardinal?

SPINNEY
Yes. El Greco's portraits are of
real people.

LITTLE BOY
But sometimes a painter paints people
who aren't real.

SPINNEY
That's true, Johnny. Different artists
are inspired by different things.
Sometimes it's their wives -- or
their mothers --

CYNICAL LITTLE BOY
Or their goil-friends --

The children giggle a little.

SPINNEY
(seriously, but smiling)
Yes, Freddie -- or their girl friends.
(her smile fades as
she looks away a
little)
But, of course, some artists are
inspired by things that only they
can see --

CYNICAL LITTLE BOY
Aw! How can dey see anything no one
else sees? Are dey crazy?

SPINNEY
No. A lot of people do think artists
are crazy, but that's only because
we ordinary people haven't the vision
of genius -- We miss so much... so
much... Things we just don't see --
until that --
(she turns to Freddie,
smiles a little)
that craziness you speak of, Freddie,
shows them to us.

She pauses a moment. We HOLD her for a foot or two as she's
lost in her thoughts.

5. THE CHILDREN

Watch her -- and the Cynical Little Boy makes a gesture to
the other children covertly, indicating that Miss Spinney is
a bore or nuts or both. After a moment we hear over this,
Spinney's voice:

SPINNEY'S VOICE
Take William Blake, for example --

DISSOLVE TO:

6. CLOSE SHOT OF THE PAINTING THE WISE AND FOOLISH VIRGINS
BY WILLIAM BLAKE

We hear Spinney's voice over the painting, then CAMERA PULLS
BACK to include Spinney and the children in front of the
painting.

SPINNEY
Blake seldom used models for any of
his figures. He saw what we see --
but he also saw the spirit -- and
that's what he painted. Just before
he died he said, "I should be sorry
if I had any earthly fame, for
whatever natural glory a man has is
so much taken away from his spiritual
glory. Why, when Blake was only a
little boy --
(she turns to Freddie)
-- about your age, Freddie -- he saw
a whole flock of angels sitting on
the boughs of a tree.

CYNICAL LITTLE BOY
(scornfully)
Angels!

SPINNEY
You don't believe in angels?

CYNICAL LITTLE BOY
Coitainly not!

SPINNEY
Don't be so sure... When you're older
you'll believe in lots of things you
can't see.
(then that same far-
away look)

ROMANTIC LITTLE GIRL
Are those angels, Miss Spinney?

SPINNEY
No -- those are virgins. The picture
is called "The Wise and Foolish
Virgins."

CYNICAL LITTLE BOY
(examining the painting)
Which is de wise ones?

SPINNEY
(hurriedly)
Come, children. We'll go to the next
one.

As they start off, we

DISSOLVE TO:

7. ANGLE ON FACES OF SPINNEY AND CHILDREN

They are staring at a portrait (behind CAMERA), and are
obviously very much taken with it. After a moment:

ROMANTIC LITTLE GIRL
My! Isn't she pretty?

SPINNEY
(a little surprised)
Pretty?... Yes, she is pretty...
very pretty.

ANOTHER CHILD
(advancing a step,
looks down and reads
slowly)
"Portrait... of... Jennie... by
Eben... Adams."

During the last couple of words, the CAMERA HAS MOVED UP AND
FORWARD TO A CLOSEUP OF SPINNEY. We see in her face how much
this portrait means to her; her emotion and her pride.

SPINNEY
Yes... "Portrait of Jennie -- by
Eben Adams."

There is almost a suggestion of a tear in her eye as she
looks at the portrait.

8. REVERSE ANGLE ON THE GROUP - COMPARATIVELY LOW CAMERA

During the following, we SLOWLY PULL BACK to reveal the
portrait bit by bit until it is in full view over the heads
of the group at the end of the following:

At first Spinney is again the professional teacher, but as
she gets toward the end of the speech, her personal interest
and emotion and increase in feeling take hold of her again.

SPINNEY
-- And it might be well to note --
with some pride, perhaps -- that
here we have a portrait painted by
an American -- and not so many years
ago -- that has been considered of
sufficient merit to hang here in the
Metropolitan... In this portrait you
can feel the extraordinary spiritual
vision of the artist -- not only his
talent as a painter, but the genius
that we can only sense -- and not
quite understand.

9. A SHOT OF THE PORTRAIT ITSELF

(NOTE: It is suggested that in the staging of the whole scene
we try to get the effect of a slightly changing light; and
that we also try to get this in the Long Shot Exterior with
which the picture opens in order to justify this slightly
changing light. This in order that we might be able to take
full advantage of Joe August's stunningly successful test
experiments with the slightly changing light on the portrait
in this particular angle. But we should have protection
without the changing light in the event that this does not
work out well.)

There is nothing under this shot of the portrait but the
MUSIC. Here it is suggested that we introduce for the first
time the "WHERE I COME FROM" theme, starting its use during
and under Spinney's speech and giving it full play without
dialogue under this shot.

ANOTHER ANGLE - PERHAPS PROFILE AND LOW CAMERA - ON SPINNEY
AND THE CHILDREN -

(The shot in any event should feature Spinney -- and this is
an excellent opportunity to make superb use of Miss
Barrymore's profile.)

ROMANTIC LITTLE GIRL
Was Jennie real?

SPINNEY
Well now, Millicent, there's a strange
legend about that. I never saw Jennie,
but --
(she stops herself
short and the far-
away look comes into
her eyes)

ROMANTIC LITTLE GIRL
Did anyone ever see her?

SPINNEY
(pulling herself
together, coming out
of her thoughts)
Why, of course. Eben Adams saw her.
There's the portrait. It's proof
that he saw her. I remember he once
said...

ROMANTIC LITTLE GIRL
(interrupting)
Oh, did you know Eben Adams?

Pause as Spinney realizes she has gone too far, but now she
must proceed and answer the question.

SPINNEY
I knew him in the days before he
painted this picture -- and in the
days after -- when he --

The Cynical Little Boy gives an elaborate and noisy fake
yawn. She looks at him, realizes that she's been carried
away for a second. She is embarrassed, lowers her eyes, then
regains her dignity and composure.

SPINNEY
That will be all for today, children.
Class is dismissed.

THE CHILDREN
Yes, Miss Spinney. Goodbye, Miss
Spinney.

The children are delighted that the class is over. The Cynical
Little Boy is out first and way ahead of them. The Romantic
Little Girl trails behind a few feet reluctantly, looking
back at the portrait and Miss Spinney.

ROMANTIC LITTLE GIRL
(tenderly)
Goodbye, Miss Spinney...

Spinney doesn't answer, for she is again lost in her thoughts
as she looks at the picture. CAMERA MOVES UP SLOWLY to Spinney
so that we see clearly she is not speaking, and we hear her
voice in almost a stage whisper.

(NOTE: Mr. Stewart will please note that we should experiment
with Miss Barrymore's voice before we reach this scene and
see what effects we can get with this and other narrations
through the picture.)

SPINNEY'S VOICE
Eben -- Eben -- how slowly the years
go by -- such tired, dead years --
if I could only turn them back to
you. Yes, back to the days when you
were poor -- and cold -- and
friendless -- your work unknown.
Harsh, harsh years for you, Eben --

As she is speaking:

DISSOLVE TO:

CENTRAL PARK - WINTER

(already shot)

Along the deserted walk we see Eben Adams, walking slowly
and dejectedly. He is a slender young man in his thirties,
bare-headed, dressed in a thin shabby overcoat hanging loosely
from his hunched shoulders. He is carrying a large portfolio
containing sketches. His face is weary, bitter, preoccupied.

SPINNEY'S VOICE
(continuing)
For those were the years when there
was a hunger in you for more than
food. There was a suffering in you
that was worse than anything a winter,
or poverty, could do. It was a winter
of your mind when the life of your
genius seemed frozen and motionless --
and how did you know if spring would
ever come again to set it free?

As she is talking:

DISSOLVE TO:

12. EXTERIOR MATHEWS GALLERY - SHOOTING TOWARD THE SHOP

Adams stops, looks at the brass plates on the small building.
His eye stops at one and we either MOVE IN to it or CUT to
it:

MATHEWS-SPINNEY GALLERY

13. BACK TO ADAMS

Adams decides to go in and enters.

During the above action, we hear Spinney's voice:

SPINNEY'S VOICE
(continuing)
Oh, Eben, I will never forget the
day you first came into our place.
There was a desperation that had
taken hold of you, a dreadful feeling
of the world's indifference. Your
courage was running out fast, like
sands from a glass. You were at the
bottom -- without money or friends --
without hope --

14. INTERIOR MATHEWS GALLERY - FULL SHOT

(NOTE: It is suggested that we not see Adams' face very
clearly, if at all, in scenes 12, 13 or 14 until the place
indicated. We've built up to Adams and let's raise the curtain
on him.)

It is a small place -- a one room gallery in the rear. There
is nobody in the room when Adams enters (CAMERA is on his
back -- Adams walks away from CAMERA. We still have not seen
his face), but when the tinkle of the doorbell is heard, a
man emerges from the office. It is Henry Mathews. He
approaches Adams. CAMERA DOLLIES IN TO A MEDIUM CLOSE SHOT
OF ADAMS AND MATHEWS, SHOOTING OVER ADAMS' SHOULDER AT
MATHEWS.

MATTHEWS
Yes, sir. What can I do for you?

15. ANOTHER ANGLE - OVER MATHEW'S SHOULDER AT ADAMS

Adams is opening his portfolio. In the middle of this angle,
he rather slowly, but not unnaturally, raises his head and
for the first time we see his face.

ADAMS
I don't know. You could buy one of
my pictures, perhaps.

Mathews coughs lightly.

MATTHEWS
(worriedly)
Landscapes?

ADAMS
Yes, mostly.

MATTHEWS
Well, I don't know. Of course we buy
very, very little... almost nothing.
And the times being what they are...
however, let me see what you have.

The camera trucks with them to a small table near the window.
Adams starts to open his portfolio.

MATTHEWS
(continuing)
Landscapes... hmmmm... yes... too
bad.

16. MED. CLOSE SHOT AT TABLE WITH SKETCHES

Adams has opened the portfolio and stands aside to let
Matthews look at them.

ADAMS
(in way of explanation)
Those are some studies I did at Cape
Cod... That one is the fisheries at
North Truro.
(as MATTHEWS turns
the sketches)
That's Cragmore.

MATTHEWS
(sadly)
Landscapes!

As they are speaking, a woman comes in from a rear room and
quietly looks over Matthews' shoulder at the sketches. She
is a lean frosty-eyed woman of about forty-five -- and we
suddenly realize that it is MISS SPINNEY -- years younger.

ADAMS
(burning a bit at
Matthews' attitude)
Here are one or two sketches of the
city. There's the bridge.

MATTHEWS
(vaguely)
Yes... Yes, it's a good bridge. I
just don't happen to like bridges.
They come in every day by the dozen.

He suddenly notices Miss Spinney, peering over his shoulder.

MATTHEWS
Miss Spinney -- you startled me!
This is my partner, Miss Spinney --
I don't believe I caught your name.

ADAMS
I didn't say it.
(With kind of sharp,
defiant pride, as
though he were saying
"Raphael" or
"Rembrandt")
My name is Eben Adams.

SPINNEY
(brusquely)
What are you so defensive about?

ADAMS
(backing down a little)
I'm not --

SPINNEY
(mocking him)
"I'm Eben Adams!" You might be better
off if you weren't! You might eat.

Adams grimly starts to put his pictures back in the portfolio.

SPINNEY
Don't be in such a hurry! Let's see
what else you've got.

ADAMS
Nothing, I'm afraid, that would
interest you or your partner.

SPINNEY
You're probably right. But do you
mind if I take a look at what
interests you?

Spinney's brusqueness seems to intimidate Adams. He lets her
take the portfolio away from him, and she starts to turn
through the pictures. Adams looks somewhat helplessly at
Matthews, who shrugs his shoulders, having bowed for many
years before the natural force that is Miss Spinney.

17. MED. CLOSE SHOT OF SPINNEY SHOOTING DOWN TO PAINTING OF
FLOWER

SPINNEY
(Dryly)
You paint a nice flower.

18. MED. CLOSE SHOT - ADAMS MATTHEWS SHOOTING TOWARDS SPINNEY

ADAMS
Thank you.
(With a flash of
irritation, reaching
for the portfolio)
Look, Miss Spinney --

SPINNEY
(Ignoring him)
Sit down, Adams. You may not sell
anything, but you can rest.

MATTHEWS
(Softly)
I'd advise you to sit down.

ADAMS sits down reluctantly.

SPINNEY
(slowly, almost
indifferently, as
she continues to
look at the paintings)
Ever read Robert Browning?

ADAMS
Yes... a long time ago.

SPINNEY
Remember his poem about Andrea Del
Sarto? The perfect painter? --
proportion, anatomy, color, -- he
had everything. And he had nothing.
He could paint a perfect hand, where
Raphael drew a formless claw. But
Raphael loved what he did, and poor
Andy Del Sarto...

ADAMS
I get your point.

MATTHEWS
(embarrassed by her
forthrightness)
Miss Spinney --

SPINNEY
Oh, don't be so soft, Mr. Mathews!
I'm an old maid -- and no one knows
love like an old maid!
(almost harshly, to
Adams)
And there isn't a drop of it in your
work!

19. CLOSE SHOT SPINNEY SHOOTING TO ADAMS

She looks straight into Adams' eyes. He stares back at her.
After a few moments, Adams' eyes waver; he turns away.

SPINNEY
(relentlessly)
You're a closed man, Adams. You must
learn to care deeply about something.
We'll take the flower.

20. MED. CLOSE SHOT - MATHEWS, SPINNEY, ADAMS

MATTHEWS
(shocked)
What?

SPINNEY
Yes -- I have a weakness for flowers,
and he doesn't do too badly with
them.
(to Adams)
We'll give you twelve dollars and
fifty cents, and if there's any
argument, there's no sale.

ADAMS
(with a wry smile)
There's no argument.

SPINNEY
Pay him, Mr. Mathews.

MATHEWS, bewildered, takes out a wallet, peels off some bills.

MATTHEWS
Have you got change of a dollar?

ADAMS
I haven't got a dime.

SPINNEY
He'll owe us fifty cents.

ADAMS
If you want more flowers, I've a
carload of them at home.

SPINNEY
That's what I was afraid of.
(then, gruffly)
Good day, Adams.

ADAMS
Good day -- and --

He hesitates. Spinney turns back and looks at him. Their
eyes meet for a moment.

SPINNEY
Yes?

ADAMS
Thank you. I -- I don't think you
really want the painting.

SPINNEY
(gruffly)
If I hadn't wanted it I wouldn't
have taken it.

They look at each other a moment, then Adams smiles -- a
warm understanding smile. Then suddenly he blurts out,
impulsively --

ADAMS
You have beautiful eyes.

Miss Spinney stares at him, bewildered, not believing her
ears.

ADAMS
Good bye.

He goes out of the door. Spinney stands looking after him,
lost in thought, a strange, distant smile on her lips.
Matthews looks at her a moment, a faint smile on his face.
Then he looks down at the painting.

21. MED. CLOSE SHOT MATTHEWS, SPINNEY

MATTHEWS
Oh, dear, I'm afraid that painting
isn't worth more than a couple of
dollars.

SPINNEY
(Her mind way off)
No -- but Adams is.

MATTHEWS
(with unaccustomed
spunk)
Of course, we're supposed to be in
business for profit, Miss Spinney...
(frightened at the
enormity of his
courage)
I thought.

SPINNEY
I bought this painting for myself.

MATTHEWS
Oh --
(with a smile --
relieved)
It's peculiar what a little compliment
can do.

Slowly Miss Spinney looks at him.

SPINNEY
My first in twenty years, Mr.
Matthews.

She turns and goes out of the room, Matthews following her
with his eyes.

DISSOLVE TO:

22. MED. CLOSE TRUCKING SHOT ADAMS - CENTRAL PARK - TWILIGHT

(already shot)

As he walks along, he is deep in thought. From far away, the
sound of a piano can be heard. Some one is playing a simple
tune with one finger. Curiously, this melody seems to drift
out of an open window across the square, clearly and
distinctly, in spite of the city noises.

MED. CLOSE SHOT - ADAMS

(already shot)

Now he notices a parcel lying on one of the benches. It is
something wrapped in an old faded newspaper and tied together
with a string. He approaches the bench, bends over the parcel
and reaches out to pick it up. At this instant, a voice is
heard.

JENNIE'S VOICE
It belongs to me.

CLOSEUP - ADAMS

(already shot)

We see his tired face turning in astonishment toward the
voice.

25. MED. LONG SHOT - ADAMS AND JENNIE (AGE TEN)

(already shot)

Jennie is putting the finishing touches to a snow man. She
is dressed in old-fashioned clothes, a coat, gaiters, high
buttoned shoes, and large beaver hat. Adams watches her for
a while. She is paying no attention to him whatsoever.

ADAMS
(calling to her)
It's getting pretty dark. Oughtn't
you be home?

JENNIE
(working on her snow
man)
Is it late? I don't know time very
well.

ADAMS
Yes, it's late.

JENNIE
Well, I don't have to go home yet.
Nobody's ready for me.

CLOSE SHOT - ADAMS

(already shot)

Looking around to see whether there is anyone with her.

ADAMS
Isn't anybody here with you?

MED. SHOT - JENNIE

(already shot)

She keeps right on with the snow man.

JENNIE
No. Why should there be?

She puts the finishing touches to the snow man, sticks a
twig in his side.

JENNIE
(brushing off the
snow from her coat
and going to him)
Anyway, you're with me.

28. MED. TWO SHOT - ADAMS AND JENNIE

(already shot)

As she comes to him

JENNIE
I'm Jennie.

ADAMS
Jennie? Jennie what?

JENNIE
Jennie Appleton. Father and Mother
are actors and actresses. They're
working at Hammerstein's Victoria.
They do juggling on a rope.

ADAMS
Did you say Hammerstein's?

JENNIE
Uh-huh. Why?

ADAMS
Because it was torn down years ago,
when I was a boy.

JENNIE
You must be thinking of some other
place because I was there only
yesterday.

ADAMS
(confusedly)
Well, I...

JENNIE
Now let me see your pictures, Mr. --

ADAMS
Adams... and how do you know they
are pictures?

JENNIE
Oh, I just know.

29. ANOTHER ANGLE OF ADAMS AND JENNIE

(already shot)

Shooting across their shoulders down on the portfolio which
is resting in Jennie's lap. Adams watches her closely as her
face puckers up with concentration. Silently, she turns a
few of the sketches -- mostly landscapes of the Park and the
City -- until she comes to a sketch of Cape Cod. It shows a
church with its steeple standing near the bay. A dark, stormy
sky stretches across the landscape.

JENNIE
Those are awful little windows for
such a big church.

ADAMS
They have to be little -- there's so
much wind on Cape Cod.

JENNIE
I don't like it. It scares me.

ADAMS
The wind?

JENNIE
No -- the black water.
(she studies it for a
moment)
There should be a lighthouse out
there on the ocean.

ADAMS
Yes, there should be. How do you
know?

JENNIE
I don't exactly remember.
(she puts her finger
on the sketch)
Some day I'll show it to you. Out
there on the rocks. The Land's End
Light.

ADAMS
I thought you said you didn't
remember.

CLOSE SHOT - JENNIE

(already shot)

JENNIE
I don't. I just know.
(closes portfolio and
ties it)
I wish I liked your pictures, but I
don't.

ADAMS
That's what everybody says, that's
why I can't sell them.

JENNIE
Maybe you shouldn't paint places.
Why don't you paint people, instead?
Cecily Brown's home is full of
pictures of people.

ADAMS
Who is Cecily Brown?

JENNIE
She's my best friend. I go to school
every day now but only in the morning.

ADAMS
And what do you learn?

JENNIE
Yesterday we learned all about the
Kaiser. He's the king of Germany.

ADAMS
(correcting her)
He was. A long time ago.

JENNIE
You're wrong. Cecily Brown's father
is in Germany now. He sees him all
the time.

ADAMS
But he...

JENNIE
He says the Kaiser rides around on a
white horse and he likes to fight. I
can fight, too. I can fight Cecily.
She's bigger but I'm stronger. I can
fight her good.

ADAMS
I thought Cecily was your best friend.

JENNIE
She is. It's fun having somebody to
play with. Don't you have anyone to
play with?

ADAMS
(laughs)
No.
(he rises to go)

JENNIE
(getting up)
Well, I'll walk a ways with you, if
you don't mind -- because it's a
little lonesome here all by myself.
(she comes to his
side)
I know a song, too. Would you like
to hear it?

As they walk along, she sings, camera pulling back with them.
It is the same simple, haunting tune we have heard before
played on the piano.

JENNIE
(singing)
Where I come from Nobody knows; And
where I'm going Everything goes.
The wind blows, the sea flows --
Nobody knows. Where I come from
Nobody knows.

They stop walking.

ADAMS
Who taught you that?

JENNIE
Nobody. It's just a song... Do you
know the game I like to play best?

ADAMS
No. What?

JENNIE
It's a wishing game. I'll tell you
what I wish most.

ADAMS
What do you wish?

JENNIE
First you have to close your eyes
and turn around three times.

Adams watches her as Jennie closes her eyes and turns around.

JENNIE
(as she turns)
I wish you'd wait for me to grow up
so we can always be together.
(she stops and faces
him)
But you won't, I guess.
(quickly)
Well, I can't talk to you anymore...
Goodbye.

Jennie turns and starts to walk away from him. Adams suddenly
recalls the parcel.

ADAMS
I'll get your parcel.

He goes to the bench.

CLOSE SHOT - BENCH

(already shot)

On it lies the parcel wrapped in the faded newspaper. Adams
picks it up.

MED. SHOT - ADAMS

(already shot)

He turns back to where he left Jennie and there is no sign
of her.

ADAMS
(calling)
Jennie! Jennie!

Slowly, CAMERA PANS down the road. It is empty. Jennie is
gone.

DISSOLVE TO:

33. LONG SHOT (STOCK) NEW YORK - WINTER

DISSOLVE TO:

34. MED. CLOSE SHOT INT. OLD BROWNSTONE NIGHT (WINTER) HALL

Everything is quiet for a moment, and then the front door
opens cautiously and we see Adams come in. He closes the
door quietly behind him and starts softly toward the stairs.
As he about reaches them, we hear a voice o.s.

VOICE
Is that you, Mr. Adams?

We see Adams' shoulders suddenly slump. He gives a deep sigh
and turns wearily.

ADAMS
(resigned)
Yes, Mrs. Jekes.

35. A SMALL LIVING ROOM OFF THE HALL

In it we see, Mrs. Jekes -- a tall, boney woman -- sitting
with another woman, a little, elderly, mousey person. A pay
telephone is on the side of the wall.

Adams turns as Mrs. Jekes comes into the hall and stands
facing him.

MRS. JEKES
(sarcastic)
You always come in so extremely quiet.
I can hardly hear you, Mr. Adams. So
thoughtful of my other tenants...

The little ELDERLY LADY comes to the door and listens, a
smirk on her face.

ADAMS
Well, I -- didn't want to disturb --

MRS. JEKES
Of course not. A fine gentleman like
you -- I waited to see you this
afternoon. I thought you said you
wanted to see me about something --

ADAMS
(helplessly)
Well, I --

MRS. JEKES
I hope you have no complaint to
register. You're not dissatisfied
with the service?

The little Elderly Lady sniggers.

ADAMS
No. I --

MRS. JEKES
(encouraged to show
off more by the
Elderly Lady)
That's good. Of course, there's not
much heat in your radiator, I know --
and it does make noises at night.
They don't keep you awake, do they?
(Mrs. Jekes is rewarded
by another snigger
from the Elderly
Lady)
I wouldn't want that to happen.

ADAMS
(he reaches into his
pocket and reluctantly
takes out a bill)
Look, would-would five dollars do
for awhile?

Mrs. Jekes reverts to type. She takes the bill.

MRS. JEKES
It won't do -- but I'll take it.

ADAMS
I'll try to have more for you soon.

MRS. JEKES
You better see that you do.

ADAMS
(holding up his
portfolio)
I don't imagine you'd be interested
in another one of my sketches until --
?

MRS. JEKES
Oh, no. The bathroom is full of them
now. Where would I put another one?
In my parlor?

ADAMS
(defeated)
No -- I wouldn't expect you to do
that. Well --
(Adams turns and starts
up the stairs)

36. THE TWO WOMEN

as they start back into the living room. Mrs. Jekes
automatically puts her finger into the pay phone to see if
there is any loose change. There isn't. They go in.

ELDERLY LADY
You certainly have a way, Mrs. Jekes.
Play with him like a cat with a mouse --
and then pounce! But he is attractive,
isn't he? And a gentleman besides.

MRS. JEKES
That's what makes it hard to throw
him out.

ELDERLY LADY
(grandly)
He's an ornament to your house, Mrs.
Jekes.

MRS. JEKES
Just can't understand a man fiddlin'
away his time just paintin' things --
though he did shovel some snow to
pay part of last month's rent.

ELDERLY LADY
(with a gleam in her
eye)
Paintin' things! Women? You mean,
women in the -- ?

She leans over and whispers in Mrs. Jekes' ear. Mrs. Jekes
draws herself up.

MRS. JEKES
(with dignity)
Mrs. Delaney! We agreed he was a
gentleman! Gentlemen don't paint
women in the --

She leans over and whispers in Mrs. Delaney's ear.

ELDERLY LADY
(crestfallen)
No -- no, of course not.

37. UPSTAIRS HALL - NEAR ADAMS' ROOM

Adams hurries toward his room.

INT. ADAMS' STUDIO - NIGHT

It's a big, high room with a dark, dusty ceiling. The studio
window overlooks a line of roofs and chimneys, and through
one narrow gap one catches a glimpse of the Hudson River. At
intervals, one can faintly hear the hooting of river boats.

The room is in quite a state of disorder. A typical artist's
studio without maid service. In addition to the easel there
are palettes, tubes of color, sketches and crayons littered
on the work table and floor. There is a worn narrow couch,
one rather beautiful oak armchair, and a number of stools
and rickety furniture pieces as would be found in a cheaply
and carelessly put together place.

Adams enters room, sees a man dressed in his hat and coat,
absorbed in looking at one of his pictures. He recognizes
him, and bursts out.

ADAMS
Arne, you old tramp! When did you
get back? What are you doing here?

ARNE
Looking at your pictures. Terrible!
Horrible! It is more horrible than
when I was in town six months ago. I
am depressed. I wish I hadn't stopped
in to see you. I will be depressed
for weeks. How are you, my friend!
(he holds out his
hand. They shake)

ADAMS
(with a grin)
After that, I feel pretty good...
It's nice to see you, Arne.

ARNE
Here is my new stuff. Twenty pictures
in a month.
(he points to a
portfolio on the
side)

ADAMS
Twenty pictures! Fast work, I'd say --
how did you do it?

ARNE
With my thumb. No more brushes for
me. I paint with my thumb. Yes, my
friend, with my thumb.
(he kisses his
fingertips)
Brushes? -- That's old stuff. That's
passe, fini.

ADAMS
(amused)
No brushes? You mean it seriously?
That's something new. Last time you
were here you told me...

ARNE
What I told you yesterday, I don't
remember today. The trouble with you
is that you don't understand the
first principles of art. Now, look
here, what's this?
(pointing to a flower
piece on the wall)

ADAMS
(perplexed)
What do you mean, what's this? Can't
you see?

ARNE
No! Can you?

ADAMS
Of course. It is a flower.

ARNE
A flower? Ha! If it's a flower, why
doesn't it smell? Why doesn't it
grow?

ADAMS
(smilingly)
That's silly. It's a painting.

ARNE
Exactly. A painting. Then why do you
fool yourself calling it a flower...
besides, if I want flowers, I get
them at a flower shop; they cost
less and smell better... here, I'll
show you something.
(he goes to his paper
portfolio, takes out
one of his pictures
which is painted in
the style of Pablo
Picasso's paintings
of the period of
extreme abstractions)
Look at this.

ADAMS
What is it?

ARNE
Guess.

ADAMS
I can't make it out.

ARNE
You guessed it.

ADAMS
(completely lost)
I can't understand.

ARNE
Naturally. This is called "Woman on
the Dynamo." The Dynamo -- the symbol
of the world we live in; the woman,
the symbol of the thing we live for...
on one side we have power, speed,
machines... on the other side --
woman, love, the soul. I am in
between, so it's bang on one side...
bang on the other.

Arne is looking as Adams examines the picture.

ARNE
You don't like her!

ADAMS
Oh, I wouldn't say that. It's just
that, well -- she doesn't exactly
remind me of my mother.
(patting him on the
shoulder)
Arne, you're as mad as you ever were.

ARNE
Don't we live in a mad world? If you
want to remain sane in a mad world,
you are doubly mad... open your eyes.
Look through the window. There is an
airplane flying; before you take
your shoes off, it will be in Europe.
On the rooftops -- everywhere --
radio towers. Sneeze here, and in a
split second they hear it in Ethiopia.
In times like these, you are sitting
here painting a flower... Soft...
sweet... a child licking an ice cream
cone...

ADAMS
(kidding him)
Hmmm... Might not be a bad idea for
a picture...
(musing)
Ice cream cone.

ARNE
All right. But if you must paint an
ice cream cone, paint it like a rocket
to the moon! Paint the ball of ice
cream as if you were licking a bomb
with your lips. But who wants ice
cream? If I want ice cream, I go to
a soda fountain... say, do you have
some bicarbonate of soda, by any
chance?

ADAMS
I think I have.
(he goes to look for
it)
There was some here. Oh, here it is.
Maybe, this will make you see my
pictures in a better light.

ARNE
(while Adams is looking
for a glass of water)
I hope you are not mad at me.

ADAMS
(bringing the water)
No, not at all. I guess you're right.
I guess my stuff hasn't much feeling
of the world today. As a matter of
fact, I guess it hasn't much feeling
at all. I know it, and so I've about
made up my mind to quit and get a
job.

ARNE
A job!

ADAMS
Honestly, Arne. Don't you think that's
what I should do?

A moment's pause. Arne looks at Adams, seriously. We suddenly
realize Arne at the moment is not the buffoon that he seems
to be. We see that underneath he is sincere and honest. He
senses Adams' depression. He puts his hand on Adams' shoulder.

ARNE
(simply and sincerely)
Adams -- I never thought you were a
genius -- but one thing I have always
admired about you. Your sincerity!
Do not lose that sincerity, Adams!
Be true to yourself! Sincerity is
the most important thing of all!
(suddenly he flashes
back into character)
A job!

ADAMS
There's nothing insincere about taking
a job, is there?

ARNE
It is the most insincere thing of
all! You think a man can have a job
and be sincere?

ADAMS
I don't see why not.

ARNE
Impossible! That is what the very
word "job" means! You are doing one
thing -- when you should be doing
another! Can you name me one man who
has a job who doesn't wish he was
doing something else! Here is a clerk --
who wanted to be a doctor. A truck
driver who wanted to be President. A
President who wanted to be a
haberdasher! Instead of being true
to themselves -- they took jobs!
Bowed down to life! Never make that
compromise, Adams. Never, never take
a job... Well, salute.
(raises his glass)

ADAMS
(gloomily)
To what? To whom?

ARNE
To the masses, of course. Art belongs
to the masses.
(he reflects a second)
If they'd only buy my pictures, I'd
salute them with champagne. And that
brings me to the point of my present
visit. Have you some filthy lucre on
you, by any chance?

ADAMS
Strangely enough, I have.

He fishes in his pocket, peels off one bill, leaving himself
two other bills. Arne peers at the remaining bills.

ARNE
Five dollars, hmmm? Is that the best
you can do?

ADAMS
(with a little laugh)
I'm sorry, Arne. I wish I could make
it more.

ARNE
(resigned, as though
doing him a big favor)
Don't apologize. I'll take it. And
do you know why I'll take it? It's
because you have a soul -- the soul
of an artist -- if only you could
paint. Well, so long.
(he walks off)

ADAMS
Goodbye, Arne. Thanks for the visit.

Adams remains standing looking after him a moment,
thoughtfully. Arne's quick appearance has done more to enhance
his loneliness. He closes the door quietly and stands looking
around the room. We feel that he is miserably alone. He picks
up the sketch of the dynamo and looks at it a moment, then
puts it down. He picks up one of his own sketches, looks at
it a moment, then puts it away from him, shaking his head
dismally. He crosses slowly to the window and stands looking
out. Leaning his head against the cool window pane, he stares
at the dark jagged line of roofs, outside and the river
beyond. We hear the mournful hooting of the tugboats on the
river. He listens to them. Slowly it seems as though there
were some pattern to the sound -- it seems as if for a moment,
a little of the sound of Jennie's theme song is heard. Adams
listens, a slightly puzzled expression on his face. He sits
down and picks up his concertina and begins to play idly.
Jennie's theme song creeps in this too. He plays for a moment,
then puts the concertina down and moves to his drawing board.
He sits before it, staring at the blank paper. Then slowly,
almost subconsciously, he picks up a crayon and starts to
make a sketch of Jennie. As we PAN TO A SHOT OF NEW YORK
FROM THE WINDOW.

DISSOLVE TO:

SHOT OF NEW YORK - DAY

DISSOLVE TO:

45. EXT. STREET NEAR ADAM'S HOUSE - NOON

Adams, his portfolio under his arm, is walking down the
street. He has the paper of Jennie's that he picked up from
the bench in his pocket. He comes to a corner and, as he
hesitates a moment, we hear --

VOICE
How'ya, Mack?

Adams looks up and smiles and walks over to the garage. Near
the entrance stands Gus, a driver. He has his cap on, but
his sleeves are rolled up and he has a wrench or some kind
of repairing instrument in his hand. He is looking at Adams.

ADAMS
Good morning, Gus.

GUS
Mornin' is it? You've slept it all
away, Mack... it's gone forever...
An' a grand mornin' it was, too.

ADAMS
Yes -- I worked late last night --
didn't get to sleep until about dawn.

GUS
Had your breakfast?

ADAMS
Why, no --

GUS
Then how's about havin' some lunch
with me?

ADAMS
No, thanks. I'm not eating off you,
Gus. You work too hard for your money.

GUS
You gotta eat, Mack. That's a rule.

ADAMS
Hey, wait a minute -- I've got some
money of my own.
(He puts his hand
into his pocket)

GUS
(pleased)
No kiddin'.

ADAMS
Sold a picture -- seven dollars and
a half --

GUS
What do you know!

ADAMS
So today you're lunching on me.

GUS
(warmly)
It'll be a real pleasure, Mack...
Just come along a minute while I fix
up the hack, and we'll be soon on
our way.

He starts walking into the garage, Adams at his side, towards
his cab. During the following they reach the cab which has
its hood up -- and maybe it's on some round platform or
instrument so the motor can be worked on:

ADAMS
You know, Gus -- I don't get you at
all.

GUS
(pleased)
No kiddin'! -- Sure, there's nothin'
very puzzlin' about me, Mack.

ADAMS
There is to me. Why should you care
if I eat or not?

GUS
(after a moment)
Maybe I don't like to see people
hungry.

Gus gets under the engine and the following is played with
Adams leaning against the cab, his foot on the running board
or in any other fashion that the setting makes possible.
(NOTE: Gus' cab and the other cabs that are visible should
be, if possible, those of about 1930 and certainly not any
later than the early 1930s, avoiding the streamline models
of the 1940s)

ADAMS
Neither do I, but --

He pauses.

GUS
(getting under the
engine)
Well, let me put it this way, Mack.
Remember the day you staggered past
where I was parked on Second Avenue?

ADAMS
(quietly)
I remember.

GUS
(tinkering; his face
is not visible)
I thought you were just plastered.
Then something about you made me
say, "Timothy Agustin, that guy's
not drunk. I bet he's hungry." And I
saw that portfolio thing you're always
carrying under your arm.
(he pauses. Adams
looks down at his
portfolio)
I had a kid brother in Ireland once.
He never knew when it was time to
eat, neither. He was always messin'
around -- tryin' to write a poem --
or paint a picture -- or make
somethin' out of little pieces of
wood and stuff... He died one day.

ADAMS
(quietly)
That's tough, Gus.

GUS
(coming out from under
the engine; he puts
down the hood of the
cab, puts the
instrument to one
side, and during the
following approaches
and stands talking
to Adams, rolling
down his sleeves the
while)
I got a lot of respect for a guy
that's doin' what he's got to do --
even if may be it's killin' him. Now
you got no mother back in Ireland
like I have --

ADAMS
No --

GUS
Nobody. Nothin' that's depending on
you but your own stomach. Right?

ADAMS
I guess that's right, Gus.

GUS
(wiping his hands and
putting on his coat)
So it's your own business. An' you
want to paint pictures. So you're
goin' right ahead and doin' it no
matter.
(thoughtfully)
Yeah, I like that, Mack...
(coming out of his
mood, throws open
the door of the cab)
Here, hop in.

During the following Adams pulls the door closed as Gus gets
himself seated in the cab in his own seat.

GUS
Most of the time a guy's got the
feelin' that there's nothin' to life
but just gettin' through it as easy
and as comfortable as he can -- makin'
a quarter here -- a dollar there --
and eatin' an' sleepin' an' dyin'.
An' then a guy like you comes along
who's not thinkin' too much about
them things and it starts you
wonderin'. Wonderin' if you're not
missin' something.
(Gus starts the engine,
throws the gear shift
into first, but
doesn't release the
brake yet. He leans
over the wheel and
without turning back
to Adams, continues:)
Yeah, Mack -- since meetin' you I'm
beginnin' to think that there is
somethin' more to life. It gives you
a kind of faith. It makes you think
different about your fellow-man.
(he releases the brake)
It makes you feel kinda -- kindly
towards 'em...
(he steps on the gas,
but he hasn't gone
two feet before he
is plunk into another
cab coming in the
opposite direction)
Hey, you mug! What you think you're
doin'?

OTHER DRIVER
Aw, pull in your head!

GUS
Why don't you learn to drive that
hack?

OTHER DRIVER
(backing his cab away)
Button it up! Button it up!

GUS
(calling after him)
You take that pile of junk over to
Brooklyn sometime and get a little
practice!

DRIVER'S VOICE
(from distance)
Okay, Mack. Just keep your shirt on.

Gus goes into gear again and they move off.

GUS
(dreamily)
Yeah, it makes you feel kinda' kindly --

Adams, unseen by Gus, smiles indulgently and affectionately,
as we

DISSOLVE TO:

46. INT. MOORE'S RESTAURANT

It is one of the many eating places on Amsterdam Avenue -- a
dark, panelled room with booths, a bar on one side. It caters
to the neighborhood trade.

Gus and Adams are seated at one of the tables, plates of
corned beef and cabbage before them and glasses of beer.
Other people at other tables. Gus and Adams have just started
eating.

GUS
No, sir, don't think I've missed a
day eatin' in here for over two years.

Adams takes out the newspaper with Jennie's scarf that has
been in his pocket. It had been in his way and now he places
it on the table. As he does so, a couple of men pass the
table.

MAN
How'ya, Gus. Hi, Gus.

GUS
Howya, Mack. Howya, Mack.

They pass on. Gus continues.

GUS
It's sort of like home -- you couldn't
pay me to eat anywhere's else --
(he reaches for the
salt and knocks the
paper over that Adams
has placed on the
table)
Oh, sorry, Mack.

ADAMS
That's all right.

They both reach to pick up the paper. The scarf falls out.
Adams picks it up as Gus retains the paper.

GUS
Hey! Takin' to wearin' scarfs?

ADAMS
Oh -- that isn't mine. I found it.
It belongs to a little girl I met in
the Park. Brought it along in case I
ran into her.

GUS
(with a dubious look)
Big scarf for a little girl.

Adams has stuffed it into his pocket. Gus, in the meantime,
has glanced casually at the paper. They eat.

GUS
Well, what do you know.

ADAMS
(eating)
What?

GUS
We almost humped into a comet -- or
the comet almost bumped into us --

ADAMS
Really? When was that?

GUS
(reading)
"Halley's comet passes sun at speed
of twenty-five hundred miles a
minute... On May eighteenth the
collision between the earth and --

Adams has stopped eating and is watching Gus, suddenly
frightened.

ADAMS
What comet did you say?

GUS
Halley's.

ADAMS
What's the date again?

GUS
May 18th.
(he looks at the date
of the paper)
What do you know. This paper is
nineteen ten.

Adams reaches over and takes the paper from him.

CLOSE SHOT AT NEWSPAPER

Adams looks at the headline for a moment, then turns it
around. CAMERA DOLLIES in on a large ad located at the bottom
of the page.

INSERT - NEWSPAPER COLUMN

WE READ:

HAMMERSTEIN'S VICTORIA

WILL R. ROGERS

Expert Lariat Thrower

EVA TANGUAY

The American Comedienne

YORK & ADAMS

Comics

CAMERA MOVES IN close to INSERT:

THE APPLETONS

Novelty High Wire etc.

GUS' VOICE
Where'd you get hold of an old paper
like this?

ADAMS' VOICE
The little girl in the Park had it.

GUS' VOICE
Probably found it lyin' around in
her mother's attic.

CLOSE SHOT - ADAMS

He stares down at the paper.

ADAMS
Yeah.

TWO SHOT - ADAMS AND GUS

GUS
(curiously)
What you lookin' at?

Adams hands him the paper and points to the ad of
Hammerstein's Victoria.

Gus starts reading the ad aloud.

While he is reading Adams takes the scarf from his pocket
and turns it over in his hand. When Gus gets to the name
Appleton, Adams interrupts him.

47. MED. SHOT - FROM ADAMS' ANGLE

Adams turns to Gus, holding up the scarf.

ADAMS
(quietly)
The Appletons -- This scarf belongs
to their daughter.

GUS
(disinterested)
Yeah?...

ADAMS
She's about ten years old... She
said her name was Jennie Appleton.

GUS
(still disinterested)
Yeah?

ADAMS
(sneaking a look at
Gus, about to drop
the startling part)
Her parents are acrobats at
Hammerstein's Victoria.

GUS
(looking up at him;
then after a moment)
You mean they were acrobats at
Hammerstein's. Hammerstein's was
torn down years ago.

ADAMS
(quietly)
I know. But she said she was there --
yesterday.

GUS
(with a grin)
You know, that's what I like about
kids. Always makin' up somethin' new --
livin' in a world all their own.

ADAMS
She told me the father of one of her
classmates is in Germany now. She
said: "he sees the Kaiser all the
time."

GUS
Sounds like a nice kid. Bet she's
Irish.

ADAMS
No, she's not Irish.

Gus looks up at him suddenly, curious. Something in Adams'
tone makes him wonder.

GUS
Look! Mack! You're not tryin' to
believe this kid, are you?

After a moment, suddenly Adams grins.

ADAMS
Of course not. What do you think?

GUS
Okay.

He continues to watch Adams a moment, curiously.

48. MED. CLOSE SHOT - GUS AND ADAMS

Gus is watching him.

GUS
(quietly)
Go ahead an' eat your lunch, Mack.

ADAMS
(looking up)
What?

GUS
Put some linin' in your stomach...
When'd you last have anything to
eat?

ADAMS
(smiling)
Oh, I see. You think I'm just
imagining it all. Oh, no, she was
real enough, Gus.

GUS
I'm not arguin' with ye, but my mother
always says: "If you don't have enough
in your stomach, you get too much in
your head."

ADAMS
(good-humored)
Okay. I'll eat my lunch.

They eat a moment in silence. As Adams bends over his food,
we see Gus studying him thoughtfully. He shakes his head and
whistles softly between mouthfuls of corned beef and cabbage.
He looks around the room thoughtfully. He suddenly spots
some one.

49. ANOTHER ANGLE

Moore, the proprietor, waves and calls.

MOORE
Hi, Gus.

50. GUS

He waves and calls back.

GUS
Hi, Mack.

51. MOORE

He starts forward.

52. GUS

A quizzical expression comes to his face. He studies the
brown panelling of the room. He looks over at Adams,
thoughtfully. An idea seems to be forming in his mind. Moore
strolls up.

GUS
How's things? Meet my friend Mack.

MOORE
(to Adams)
How are you?

ADAMS
Hello.

GUS
(to Adams)
Mack here's the owner of the joint.

NOTE: The remainder of this scene should be shot in over
shoulder angles; across Gus to Moore; and across Moore to
Gus; together with individual shots of Gus, Moore and Adams.
Adams closeups should show him turning from Gus to Moore,
almost as though watching a tennis match.

MOORE
Well, sometimes, I don't know if I'm
the owner of the joint or if the
joint's the owner of me. Business
ain't too good these days. Mind if I
sit down a minute?

GUS
A pleasure.
(Moore sits)

MOORE
(to Adams)
Everything all right, sir?

ADAMS
Couldn't be better.

MOORE
I'm glad to hear you say it. An'
you, Gus, Everything all right?

GUS
Why, sure -- I guess so, Mack --

MOORE
(quickly sensing
something)
What do you mean I guess so? Anything
wrong?

GUS
No -- no -- I guess not --

They eat a moment in silence. Adams looks at Gus in surprise.
Moore regards him thoughtfully. Then:

MOORE
The food is all right?

GUS
Oh, sure, sure --

MOORE
Then what's gripin' you?

GUS
(hesitantly)
I kind of hate to say this, Mack...
you're not a man I'd like to hurt...
your feelin's, I mean... but --
(he dwindles to a
pause)

MOORE
Yeah?

GUS
Well, if you don't see me around for
awhile, don't be surprised. I've
sort of been thinkin' I might start
eatin' down at Nick's for a change.

MOORE
Nick's?

GUS
Yeah.

MOORE
Nick's!

GUS
What's the matter with Nick's?

A pause. Moore shakes his head.

MOORE
(slowly)
No-o-o... there's nothing the matter
with Nick's... I suppose -- if you
like that type of place --
(a slight pause)
So you're goin' to start eatin' down
at Nick's.
(Pause. Moore turns
to Adams; pleasantly)
It's a nice day, we're havin'.

ADAMS
Beautiful day.

MOORE
It's all that and more.
(he pauses and studies
Gus who is eating
diligently. Then:)
So you're goin' to start eatin' at
Nicks, eh?

GUS
Just thought I might for awhile.

MOORE
(to Adams)
It takes all kinda people to make a
world... all kinds... and some of
them haven't a trace of friendship,
or loyalty, or --
(he whirls on Gus)
You get as good a cornbeef and cabbage
down at Nick's?

GUS
You can't even get it there, Mack.

MOORE
But the beer is better down there?

GUS
Same beer.

MOORE
(vehemently)
Then what in the name of all the
saints are you goin' to eat down at
Nick's for?

GUS
Look, Mack, nothing personal. But a
fellow likes a change once in awhile.

MOORE
A change from what?

GUS
Well, it's... er --
(looks around, and
then with a shuddering
gesture)
It's the joint... it's... it's the
room... it's --
(quietly)
It's dark, Mack.

MOORE
Dark?

GUS
The woodwork... that dark woodwork --
(Motions at the
panelling. Then,
almost cheerfully)
Nick's got nice, bright tile down
there.

MOORE
Tile!

GUS
Yeah. You should brighten it up...
brighten up the joint, Mack. Everytime
I polish that hack of mine, I do
good business... People like things
to look good.

A pause. Adams and Gus eat. Moore regards Gus a minute, then
looks thoughtfully around the room. Then:

MOORE
I'll be puttin' no tile in this
restaurant and bar.

GUS
No... no... I wouldn't want you to
anything like that, Mack.

MOORE
What would you want me to do?

GUS
(at first he seems
puzzled for a solution)
I don't know exactly... It's not an
easy problem with all that dark
wood... but the other day I was
sittin' here, I got lookin' at that
wall... an' all of a sudden I says
to myself: "Timothy Augustin, wouldn't
it be cheerful to be lookin' at some
nice green trees, with maybe a sup
of river runnin' between them... an'
maybe a little Kerry cow or two,
munchin' the grass... or maybe --

Adams looks at him quickly, suspicious.

GUS
(continuing)
-- a whole scene from Killarney
itself... or may be, the Gap of Dunlow --

MOORE
(interrupting)
Is it pictures, you mean?

GUS
Well, I don't know, Mack. I hadn't
thought that far.

MOORE
(dubiously)
Suppose I could hang a stray picture
here and there...

GUS
(quickly)
Oh, they'd have to be the right kinda
pictures... an', anyway, I don't
think a few pictures would do it...
It's a cryin' shame that you couldn't
have a big scene painted right on
the wall... but --
(he pauses)
Of course I know that can't be done.

MOORE
Why can't it be done? Didn't ye ever
hear of muriels?

GUS
Muriels, huh?

MOORE
They're painted right onto a wall.

GUS
You don't tell me --
(he begins to get
excited)
Ye know, Mack, I think you hit on
the very thing yourself --
(he stops in
astonishment)
What d'ye know about that?

MOORE
Now what's bitin' ye?

GUS
This guy --
(points to Adams)
He's an artist, Mack... one of the
best in the world... He can tell us
all about it.

MOORE
(turning to Adams)
That so?

GUS
(cutting in fast)
Is Mack right? Is it possible to
paint a picture right on the wall?

ADAMS
(playing up)
Of course it's possible... It's done
often.

MOORE
(to Gus)
See, ye dumb ox!

ADAMS
As a matter of fact, that wall would
lend itself to a mural very well.

GUS
(suddenly, to Moore)
Look, what are we thinkin' of! Here
we got one of the grandest artists
in the world sittin' right at our
table. Why don't we talk him into
doin' somethin'?
(he turns to Adams)
You could squeeze it in, Mack?...
Oh, I know, I know, you're as busy
as a fiddler at a hurling match...
but somehow you could squeeze it...
I mean, between all your other -- ah --
(he reaches for the
word)
-- commissions.

ADAMS
Well, I don't know, Gus --

GUS
(indicating Moore)
Mack here is one of my oldest friends.
Anything you do for him, you're doin'
for me.

ADAMS
I'd have to think it over --

MOORE
(butting in)
Wait a minute -- wait a minute --
This is goin' to cost money!

GUS
An' what's money to an artist? If we
can talk him into doin' this, it
won't cost you a cent.
(to Adams)
You could drop in just now an' then
in your spare time -- say around
noon or suppertime -- you got to eat
somewhere, haven't you, Mack?

ADAMS
Yes, I suppose I have.

GUS
Then that solves the whole problem...
Come in here for your meals. . .an'
take a few minutes out after each
breakfast an' dinner an' supper...
just a few minutes to paint after
each meal --
(turns to Moore
admiringly)
You're a smart man, Mack. Gettin'
yourself a work of art for a few
meals a day.

A pause. Gus and Adams continue to eat industriously. Moore
looks from one to the other, speculatively. He smells a rat.
He looks down at the poster in his hand.

MOORE
Excuse me a moment. I've got to post
this.

He gets up and slowly goes to the wall and tacks up the
poster.

GUS
(without looking up
from his plate)
Lost him! Had him and I lost him!

ADAMS
(uncomfortable)
Let it go, Gus. Don't say anything
more.

GUS
Had him and lost him! Smelled a rat!
(he looks up slyly
and sees Moore is
posting the poster.
It is an announcement
concerning St.
Patrick's Day. Gus
thinks shrewdly for
a moment. Then he
raises his head and
his beer. He calls
to Moore)
Up the rebels!

MOORE
(turning and smiling)
Up the rebels!

GUS
Mack! Did ye ever see Mic Collins?

MOORE
I never did an' I've always regretted
it.

GUS
He musta been the boyo!... A real
Irish patriot!

MOORE
(coming back to them)
He was all that, an' more.

GUS
(firing his last
broadside)
An' we sit chatterin' of trees an'
rivers an' Kerry cows!... A fine
collection of idiots we are!... Here's
what you should do, Mack... Right
over that service door there... a
painting of Michael Collins... Mic
Collins himself, an' he leadin' his
men into battle against the might of
England.

MOORE
Now wait a minute, Gus --

GUS
Man alive... it'd be the greatest
thing to ever hit this town... Moore's
Alhambra would be the rallyin' place
for every Irish patriot to come to...
Can't you see them gatherin' in droves
to buy a beer an' get a good look at
Mic Collins himself?... Why, you
wouldn't have standin' room at the
bar... An' all you have to do... an'
you with the gift of the gab... is
to talk Mack here into painting it
for ye. An' it wouldn't cost ye a
penny in cash.

MOORE
(reflectively)
Well -- it does sound kinda
interesting...

Gus gets up. He moves around, acting out the scene.

53. PAN SHOT

CAMERA PANS with Gus as he gets up and walks toward the
service door. He plants himself in front of it, looking at
an imaginary painting above it.

GUS
Here's how I see it:
(with a nod to Adams)
Or should I say how my friend Mack
sees it?
(dramatically)
It's early dawn on a small hill in
Ireland... Wisps of fog are floating
over the ground, but the sun is
already rising behind Loch Allen.
And there...
(he points)
There on a carpet of Shamrock, under
an old elm stands Mic Collins. He's
leaning on his gun -- waitin' for
zero hour. And all the Murphys and
Flannagans and O'Sheas are waitin'
with him.
(to Moore)
An' you know what they're waitin'
for? They're waitin' for the day of
liberation. They don't know it yet,
but this is the day! In a brief
moment, Mic himself will lead them
into battle and will lead them to
victory!
(he raises his glass)
Up the rebels!

Adams and Moore have come up behind him. Moore's eyes are
shining as he raises his glass to the imaginary painting of
the Irish Patriot.

MOORE
(Elatedly)
Up the rebels!
(he turns quickly to
Adams)
You've got to paint it, Mr. Adams!

GUS
You've got to do it, Mack!

A second's pause as they wait for his decision. Adams looks
from one to the other, slowly rises and pounds his fist on
the table.

ADAMS
I'll do it!

GUS
(quickly seizes the
victory)
Up the rebels!

MOORE
Up the rebels!

ADAMS
Up the rebels!

CAMERA FALLS BACK to a picture of them all toasting and
quaffing, as we

DISSOLVE TO:

54. LONG SHOT - THE SKATERS ON THE POND IN CENTRAL PARK

CAMERA PULLS BACK and we see Adams standing at a window
watching the scene, CAMERA shooting over his shoulder. As he
looks, we hear:

MATHEWS' VOICE
(sadly)
Flowers! Flowers and landscapes!

ADAMS
(annoyed)
See here, I asked you not to look
through those. I just came in to
give you the fifty cents change on
the one you did buy.

CAMERA DRAWS BACK TO SHOW INTERIOR MATHEWS GALLERY

Mathews is standing looking through Adams' portfolio, Spinney
looking over his shoulder as he runs through the sketches.

MATTHEWS
I know, I know, Mr. Adams...
(suddenly spotting
something)
Here! What's this?

ADAMS
What?

He crosses to them and looks down at the sketch Mathews is
holding.

55. ANGLE SHOOTING DOWN OVER THEIR SHOULDERS AT SKETCH OF
JENNIE

ADAMS
Oh, that's nothing. Just a sketch of
a little girl I saw in the park.

MATTHEWS
Ah, but this is different! It's alive.
It's very good, isn't it, Miss
Spinney?

SPINNEY
(studying the sketch)
Yes -- you seem to have something
here, Adams.

MATTHEWS
Do you know why I like it?

ADAMS
Why?

MATTHEWS
Because there's a quality about that
girl reminds me of long ago...
(reaching for his
feeling)
It feels like when I was young.

ADAMS
(slowly, thinking
back)
She did have a look of not belonging --
not altogether belonging to today.

MATTHEWS
(happily)
That's it... It's more as if I've
seen her before -- somewhere in the
past. And yet I couldn't tell you
where.

SPINNEY
Yes -- there's something -- timeless
about it --

MATTHEWS
That's it. And there ought to be
something timeless about a woman --
something eternal. You can see it in
all great portraits of the past;
they make you feel you could meet
those women -- anywhere -- and be
inspired by them.
(he stops and faces
Adams. He squares
his shoulders,
defiantly)
Well, then, Mr. Adams, I'll tell you
what I'll do. I'll take that girl
and I'll give you twenty-five dollars
for it -- and I don't care what Miss
Spinney says.

He looks at Spinney defiantly. Spinney gives a faint smile.

SPINNEY
(quietly)
In that case, I won't say anything.
Now you don't have to feel quite so
sorry for yourself any more, Adams.

Mathews has been fishing for his wallet and brings out some
bills.

ADAMS
(suddenly happy)
No. Things are looking up. I get
three meals a day for doing a mural --
and now I sell a sketch for twenty-
five dollars!
(he turns to get his
hat)
Well -- thanks.
(he picks up his hat
and starts for the
door)

SPINNEY
Where are you going now?

ADAMS
(gaily)
Oh -- nowhere -- anywhere --
(suddenly he remembers
something)
Where I come from
Nobody knows;
And where I'm going
Everything goes.

Mathews looks at him as though he's mad, then looks at
Spinney.

SPINNEY
What's that?

ADAMS
Oh, something that little girl in
the Park sang.
(gesturing toward the
sketch)

SPINNEY
Well, if you don't know whether you're
coming or going, maybe you need a
cup of coffee.

ADAMS
Okay. Don't mind if I do.

SPINNEY
Come along, then.

They start to the office.

DISSOLVE TO:

56. SPINNEY'S OFFICE

Adams is standing at the window, a cup of coffee in his hands,
looking out.

57. LONG SHOT OF WHAT HE SEES

The skaters on the pond in Central Park.

58. ADAMS

As he turns from the window and goes back into the room.

ADAMS
You know, I haven't skated since I
was a kid up in Maine.

59. TWO SHOT - ADAMS AND MISS SPINNEY

As Adams sinks into a chair near where she is sitting. There
is a comfortable, cozy feeling. A fire is burning in a little
fireplace.

SPINNEY
You were brought up in Maine?

ADAMS
(grinning)
South Paris, Maine. Pretty swanky,
eh?

Spinney smiles at him.

ADAMS
Nice little town. Lakes and mountains
and rivers -- My father ran the
General Store until he died.

SPINNEY
How old were you then?

ADAMS
Oh, fifteen or so. My mother died a
couple of years later. So I pulled
out and worked my way through three
years of college, and then --
(he pauses a moment
and looks at her)
Fascinating, isn't it?

SPINNEY
It's interesting.

Suddenly Adams leans forward, serious.

ADAMS
Look, Miss Spinney. I don't feel
sorry for myself, the way you said.
And I don't even think I'm
particularly bitter. I know that
every artist that ever lived -- if
he was worth his salt -- went through
a lot more than I have -- But they
were great artists. They knew they
had something. You can take a lot of
beating if you're reasonably sure
you've got something inside of you
that makes it worthwhile. But I'm
faced with a very practical problem.
Have I got anything like that in me --
anything worth saying? There're
thousands and thousands who haven't.
Who do I think I am?

A pause. Then --

SPINNEY
Adams, you say that every great artist
went through more than you. What do
you mean by that? You mean they went
through hunger, poverty, loneliness?
Why, of course they did. But do you
think that's all they suffered? You
think they didn't also suffer --
doubt? Do you think they knew --
anymore than you do -- whether they
had anything in them worth saying?
Of course they didn't. You should
know that. Certainly you can take
any amount of punishment -- if you
know you're going to win in the end.
And of course it's the not knowing
that's brutal. But don't think for a
minute this doubt is unique with
you. It's what every artist has faced
since the beginning of time.

A pause. Adams looks at her. Then, quietly:

ADAMS
You're right, Spinney.

Adams rises, goes slowly to the window. Spinney's eyes follow
him. There is a sad, nostalgic, almost misty light in them.
It is the first time he has called her "Spinney." She gets
up and stands behind him at the window.

SPINNEY
It was a lot simpler when you were a
kid in Maine, wasn't it?

Adams smiles at her.

ADAMS
And more fun, too... How's about you
and me taking a whirl on the ice
right now?

SPINNEY
Oh, go on with you!

Adams pats her lightly on the cheek twice and smiles, then
leaves. She turns and watches him go with deep affection.

DISSOLVE TO:

60. LONG SHOT - EXTERIOR PARK - SKATERS - DAY

(already shot)

The late afternoon sun is shining on the big lake. Skaters,
singly and in pairs, glide by, circle, race. It is a picture
reminiscent of a "Currier and Ives."

60A. LONG SHOT - THE SKATERS

(already shot)

61. CLOSER ANGLE OF THE SKATERS

(already shot)

Adams skates through the crowd and forward toward CAMERA.

JENNIE'S VOICE
(very faint;
reverberated effect)
Hello!...

Adams looks around as he continues to skate forward.

JENNIE'S VOICE
(still faint;
reverberated effect)
Hello!...

Adams looks around, still not sure, as he skates by CAMERA
and out of scene.

62. REVERSE ANGLE - LOW CAMERA - ADAMS

(already shot)

As he skates away from CAMERA, Jennie's voice is again heard.

JENNIE'S VOICE
(closer now; calling;
reverberated effect)
Mr. Adams!...

He looks around in the direction of the voice.

63. MEDIUM SHOT - JENNIE - SKYLINE B.G.

(already shot)

She skates forward toward CAMERA, silhouetted against the
sun.

64. CLOSEUP - ADAMS

(already shot)

As he sees her and his face lights up.

65. CLOSE SHOT - JENNIE - SKYLINE B.G.

(already shot)

As she skates closer to CAMERA, silhouetted against the sun,
waves and calls.

JENNIE
Hello...

66. MEDIUM LONG SHOT

(already shot)

As they meet and skate together, Jennie skating in a circle
around him.

ADAMS
I can't believe it's you.

JENNIE
Why not?

ADAMS
You look so much taller.

JENNIE
Well, maybe you didn't see me so
good before.

ADAMS
I'm sure you've grown.

They stop skating.

JENNIE
Of course I have. I'm hurrying. Don't
you remember our wish?
(she takes his arm)
Let's skate.

They continue to skate.

67. MEDIUM CLOSE TWO SHOT

(already shot)

As they skate arm in arm.

JENNIE
Let's go a little faster.

68. CLOSEUP - ADAMS (PROCESS) (TO BE SHOT)

A little frightened as they pick up speed.

69. MEDIUM TWO SHOT

(already shot)

Jennie and Adams skating in a fast circle.

69a. CLOSEUP - ADAMS (PROCESS) (TO BE SHOT)

He is becoming more frightened.

69b. CLOSEUP - JENNIE (PROCESS) (TO BE SHOT)

Enjoying his fright, laughing at him.

69c. BACK TO MEDIUM TWO SHOT

(already shot)

As they skate faster and faster in a circle.

69d. CLOSEUP - ADAMS' FEET (TO BE SHOT)

Slipping out from under him.

69e. CLOSEUP - ADAMS (PROCESS) (TO BE SHOT)

Falling out of CAMERA.

69f. CLOSEUP - JENNIE (PROCESS) (TO BE SHOT)

Laughing.

69g. CLOSE SHOT - ADAMS

(already shot)

Hitting the ice.

69h. CLOSEUP - JENNIE - LOW CAMERA SHOOTING UP (PROCESS) (TO
BE SHOT)

Looking down and laughing at him.

JENNIE
You look so funny.

69j. CLOSE SHOT - ADAMS (PROCESS) (TO BE SHOT)

He picks himself up off the ice.

ADAMS
(laughing and
collecting himself)
I feel so funny.

70. TWO SHOT AND INDIVIDUALS - JENNIE AND ADAMS (PROCESS)
(TO BE SHOT)

As Adams gets up into the SHOT, he brushes off his coat, and
as he brushes off his pocket, he sees a corner of the scarf
sticking out of the pocket and suddenly remembers.

ADAMS
Oh, by the way, Jennie. I have
something of yours. Here --
(he takes the scarf
from his pocket)

JENNIE
What a pretty scarf!

ADAMS
It was in the parcel on the bench.
You said it was yours.

Adams is watching her intently.

JENNIE
(puzzled)
Did I?...
(dismissing it)
Well, if I said so it must be true...
I'll tell you what: Why don't you
keep it for me till I grow up? Then
I'll have one more reason to grow up
fast.

ADAMS
(he takes this rather
curiously, smiles)
Oh, all right.
(puts scarf into his
right pocket, takes
out his gloves from
left pocket)
I owe you a favor, anyway.

71. TWO SHOT AND INDIVIDUALS - JENNIE AND ADAMS

(already shot)

JENNIE
You do? Why?

ADAMS
I did a little sketch of you the
other day and I sold it.

JENNIE
I'm glad.

ADAMS
The man who bought it told me I ought
to paint portraits. What do you think
of that?

JENNIE
(cautiously)
Well... who would you paint, Mr.
Adams?

They start to skate again.

ADAMS
(appearing casual)
Oh, I don't know. I haven't decided
yet.

JENNIE
(after a pause)
Maybe...
(quickly and eagerly)
Will you let it be me?

ADAMS
(laughs)
Who else?

With a wild sweep, Jennie whirls around excitedly.

JENNIE
Wheeeee!
(stops, faces Adams)
I'm going to have my picture painted!
Won't Emily be mad?

ADAMS
Emily?

JENNIE
Emily's my best friend. She had her
picture painted by Mr. Fromkes and I
said you were going to do mine.

ADAMS
(looking at her,
startled)
How did you know that?

JENNIE
Well, I wished it, and then I closed
my eyes and turned around three times.

Adams laughs.

71A. CLOSEUP - JENNIE - OVER ADAMS' SHOULDER (PROCESS) (TO
BE SHOT)

(Plate No. X68X, Take 1) (TO BE INTERCUT WITH CLOSEUP ADAMS,
ALREADY SHOT)

JENNIE
But Emily still said you wouldn't
paint me and so I slapped her.

ADAMS
Emily? I thought it was Cecily you
always fought with.

JENNIE
(surprised)
Cecily?. . .
(she suddenly remembers
but can't quite
believe this is who
he means)
You don't mean Cecily Brown, do you?
Why, she moved away to Boston three
years ago. I thought I told you.

71B. CLOSEUP - ADAMS - OVER JENNIE'S SHOULDER

(already shot)

ADAMS
(slowly)
No -- you didn't.

71C. CLOSEUP - JENNIE - OVER ADAMS' SHOULDER (PROCESS) (TO
BE SHOT)

Jennie is a bit perplexed, swings around in position to match
the next shot as she thinks, talking as she does.

JENNIE
That's funny...

ADAMS
Well, never mind. Come on -- let's
skate.

He takes her arm and they start out.

71D. TWO SHOT - LOW CAMERA

(already shot)

As they skate, CAMERA PULLING BACK with them.

JENNIE
Well, I have to be going pretty soon
now.

ADAMS
Don't go.
(an excuse to hold
her)
How would you like some hot chocolate?

JENNIE
Oh, I love hot chocolate.

ADAMS
We can get it right over there.
(indicating)

DISSOLVE TO:

72. OUT

Sequence omitted from original script.

73-76. CLOSE TWO SHOT AND INDIVIDUALS (SET) (TO BE SHOT)

Jennie is seated on a bench at the edge of the ice pond,
waiting. Adams enters with two cups of hot chocolate, hands
her a cup, sits beside her. Throughout this scene Adams is
questioning himself and his whole attitude is almost like
that of a detective.

JENNIE
Oh, how wonderful! Thank you!

She starts to drink as he watches her with a curious,
penetrating look.

ADAMS
Jennie, where do you live? I'd like
to come and see.

JENNIE
(she continues to
drink for a moment
as she thinks this
over, obviously with
some effort)
I don't think there's any place you
can come and see me -- yet.

ADAMS
Why, Jennie?

JENNIE
(airily)
Oh, that's just the way it is.
(eagerly and proudly)
When will you start my portrait?

ADAMS
Whenever your -- whenever your parents
will let you...
(he watches her for a
reaction)
Where are they now?

JENNIE
They're at Hammerstein's.

ADAMS
(smiling at her, as
though a joke)
Really? Still at Hammerstein's?

JENNIE
(very proud)
Yes, and they've got wonderful new
tricks. Way up on a high wire.
(her mood changes)
Sometimes it scares me to watch them,
but of course that's silly. That's
why they're so famous. They scare
everybody.

ADAMS
(insistently)
I'd like to see them, and then I
could ask their permission for you
to come and sit for me.
(he looks at her and
smiles, as one does
to a child who is
making up a story,
and is kidding a
long with her)
Won't you take me down to
Hammerstein's to see them?

JENNIE
(eagerly)
Oh, yes! Do let's go! I can get us
in free. Could you go to the matinee
Saturday?

Adams' kidding mood changes. He looks at her gravely, puzzled.

ADAMS
I think so. Where'll I meet you?

JENNIE
Let's meet here in the Park -- at
that bench -- where we met before.
I'll be there at -- two o'clock.
(a vague, strange
look comes over her
face -- she adds
wistfully)
At least -- I'll try.
(Jennie finishes the
chocolate and rises)
That was very good chocolate. Thank
you... I really have to go now.

ADAMS
(rising)
Well, if you must...

JENNIE
I hate it to stop -- because when
will we ever have it again?...
(exiting)
Well, goodbye.

ADAMS
(watches a moment)
Goodbye, Jennie.

Jennie starts out on the ice. Adams stands watching her.

77. JENNIE - (PROCESS) (TO BE SHOT)

As she skates farther away.

NOTE: This shot should be patterned after the technique of
her entrance and she should not exit through a crowd of
skaters.

78. ADAMS - MED. SHOT - LOW ANGLE (SKY BACKING) (TO BE SHOT)

As Adams stands there, watching, Spinney comes up behind
him. He doesn't notice.

79. JENNIE - (PROCESS) (TO BE SHOT)

(continuation of 77)

Jennie disappearing.

80. ADAMS AND SPINNEY (TO BE SHOT)

(continuation of 78)

Spinney looks at Adams for a moment, then off in the direction
he is looking.

81. WHAT SHE SEES --

(already shot)

The pond is empty.

82. SPINNEY AND ADAMS (TO BE SHOT)

She looks back at Adams.

SPINNEY
Looking for someone, Adams?

ADAMS
I was just watching the little girl
I told you about. I've been skating
with her --

SPINNEY
Oh!

Spinney watches Adams who is looking off in awe and
puzzlement. As CAMERA MOVES IN a little, we hear Spinney's
voice, and on this we start a SLOW DISSOLVE:

SPINNEY'S VOICE
(as we heard it at
the beginning of the
picture)
No. I never saw Jennie.
(a slight pause)
-- I think I nearly saw her once...
Didn't I, Eben?
(another slight pause)
You saw her, in any event. That much
is sure. And there was a strange
wonder in your face...

DISSOLVE TO:

INT. MOORE'S RESTAURANT - LONG SHOT. LOW CAMERA UP AT ADAMS;
LONG SHOT. HIGH ANGLE FROM ADAMS' VIEWPOINT DOWN AT SPINNEY;
INDIVIDUALS OF EACH; AND MASTER SHOT

As Spinney's voice continues over the scene, we see Adams on
a ladder at work on his patriotic mural of Michael Collins.
He seems very gay at his work, painting easily and happily.

SPINNEY'S VOICE
(continuing)
Something had happened to you, Eben.
I don't think you were quite aware
of it yourself. Your work on your
mural was coming well - but it wasn't
only that. There seemed to be a new
Eben Adams. During those next few
days you were gayer than I had ever
seen you...

As she is speaking, we see Adams turn, look down and wave
gaily.

Spinney is seated at a table, a glass of beer before her.
Adams' coat and a rolled up sketch is on a chair beside her.
She is looking up at Adams and we see that her expression is
one of tenderness. We see her wave back to Adams.

SPINNEY'S VOICE
(continuing)
I must confess, Eben, that you made
me wish I were young again. That I
could go along with you -- carefree --
happy -- sharing whole-heartedly
your happiness...

Adams makes an elaborate Bohemian gesture with his paint
brush and looks down at her. She looks up at him and laughs.
He comes down the ladder and joins her. He uses her glass,
pours himself a glass of beer and drinks.

SPINNEY'S VOICE
(continuing)
But of course those days were long
past and I could only feel a deep
thankfulness that I could be with
you even a little -- and watch you --
and laugh with you.

While Adams talks to her, excited and eager, Spinney listens,
her eyes glued on him.

SPINNEY'S VOICE
(continuing)
I'll never forget that Saturday as I
watched you -- trying to see into
you -- scarcely listening to what
you were saying --

Adams reaches over and picks up the rolled sketch of Jennie
and shows it to Spinney.

SPINNEY'S VOICE
(continuing)
-- you showed me another sketch you
had made of Jennie. And then you
suddenly looked at your watch --
jumped up -- and said you had to go --
that you had an appointment. I half
suspected that it was with Jennie.

During the above we have seen Adams look at his watch, jump
up, and apologize as he gets into his coat. Now we see him
lean over and kiss Spinney on the cheek, then turn and leave.
Spinney looks after him a moment - then slowly we see her
hand rise and caress her cheek. She looks down at the new
sketch of Jennie.

ANGLE OVER HER SHOULDER

As we see the sketch and hear her voice over it.

SPINNEY'S VOICE
(continuing)
Oh, Eben -- how long, long ago it
seems...

DISSOLVE TO:

CENTRAL PARK - THE BENCH IN THE PARK WHERE ADAMS AND JENNIE
FIRST MET -

We see Adams waiting impatiently. He is looking all around.
He looks at a cheap nickel-plated watch, shakes his head
anxiously, and begins to walk up and down. He comes back to
the bench. Again he looks at his watch, looks all around,
and then decides to start off.

DISSOLVE TO:

POND WHERE PEOPLE ARE SKATING -

There are very few people on the ice. He watches them
anxiously. Jennie is not there. He starts off.

DISSOLVE TO:

CORNER BROADWAY AND 42ND STREET -

With all its people and traffic. CAMERA PANS DOWN and we
see: RIALTO THEATRE -- and then we see Adams walk into the
crowd -- pause -- and look at the theatre. CAMERA GOES TO
CLOSE SHOT OF NAME: RIALTO THEATRE.

ADAMS -

as he looks at it, then turns and looks at other buildings
nearby. He sees a policeman standing on the curb. He hesitates
a moment -- and then goes up to him. He stands by him a
moment, reluctant to speak. The policeman turns and looks at
him.

ADAMS
(hesitantly)
Nice day.

POLICEMAN
It is that.

ADAMS
I was just -- well -- I had a bet
with a friend of mine. I wonder if
you could help me. You remember the
old Hammerstein Theatre?

POLICEMAN
Do I remember it? Bud, you came to
the right party to ask about
Hammerstein's.

ADAMS
Well, I claimed it used to be right
down around here somewhere. My friend --

POLICEMAN
Your friend loses. Hammerstein's
used to stand right there where the
Rialto is now.

ADAMS
That's what I thought.
(he hesitates)

POLICEMAN
Yes, sir, many's the time I went to
Hammerstein's.

ADAMS
You're -- you're sure it's not here
now anywhere?

The cop turns slowly and looks at him. Adams becomes
embarassed.

ADAMS
I mean -- that is -- well, I thought
maybe --

POLICEMAN
Look, Bud, you look like a nice guy.
Better go home and sleep it off.

ADAMS
I just -- wanted to be sure.

POLICEMAN
All right -- you're sure now. Go on
home.

ADAMS
Yeah -- Thanks.
(He starts to go,
then hesitates)
Let me ask you one more question.
You say you used to go there. Do you
remember the Appletons?

POLICEMAN
Appletons?

ADAMS
They used to have an act -- trapeze --

POLICEMAN
(thoughtfully)
Seems to me -- Look, you go over and
ask old Pete. He used to be doorman
at Hammerstein's. Now he works at
the Rialto. He knows more about
Hammerstein's than anybody.

ADAMS
(brightening)
Thanks a lot.
(he goes)

89. CLOSEUP - POLICEMAN

He looks after Adams, not convinced he is all right.

90. FRONT OF RIALTO THEATRE

-- as Adams approaches. He looks around. People are entering
the theatre. He sees an attendant, but he is young and
handsome. Adams shakes his head -- looks around again --
then goes up to the young attendant.

ADAMS
(agreeably)
I was told the doorman here was an
old fellow -- name of Pete -- Don't
suppose that could be you?

YOUNG ATTENDANT
(nastily)
You don't suppose so, eh? Wise guy!

ADAMS
Well -- is there an old fellow here
named Pete?

YOUNG ATTENDANT
(jerking his head)
In there.

ADAMS
Thanks.

Adams starts toward the lobby.

90A. LOBBY - MASTER SHOT AND INDIVIDUALS

Pete is in uniform. He is in his late seventies, amiable,
pathetically dapper in a threadbare way, his once handsome
face now a ruin, his eyes watery and vacant. He just stands
at one side as the people pass in -- occasionally saying:
"Better seats to the left, please." He has obviously just
been "kept on."

PETE
Better seats to the left, please.

He nods and smiles at people as they pass in.

AN USHER
Say, pop -- it's time for your cup
of coffee...

PETE
Already?

USHER
Sure, pop, time goes fast...

PETE
Yes, it does...

ADAMS
(entering to Pete)
Excuse me -- are you Pete?

Pete has started down through lobby.

PETE
(ambling by)
Better seats to the left...

ADAMS
(mystified slightly)
I'm looking --

He watches Pete leave the lobby.

USHER
Friend of Pete's?

ADAMS
(still watching)
Oh, so that is he... I wanted to ask
him if he remembered...

USHER
Remembered? He doesn't remember
anything, Mister -- except how to
get here in the morning and go home --
wherever that is. But they tell me
he was quite a guy in his day, when...

ADAMS
(not hearing; breaking
in; still watching
where Pete went)
Thanks...

He exits quickly in pursuit of Pete.

DISSOLVE TO:

90B. INT. COFFEE SHOP

Pete is sitting in a little booth, his manner meticulous,
almost elegant, his empty eyes beaming faintly, his head
nodding to invisible admirers. A waitress brings Pete's
coffee.

WAITRESS
Got it all ready for you, pop. Why
don't you have a hamburger? Put some
meat on those bones.

PETE
Oh, no -- thank you, miss -- always
kept my figure -- slim -- straight
as an arrow --

Adams comes into the SHOT. The waitress mops the table.

ADAMS
(casually)
Mind if I sit down?

PETE
Mind? It's a pleasure... please do...

ADAMS
(to waitress as he
sits down opposite
Pete)
Coffee -- black, please.

He watches Pete pour the cream and sugar in a precise and
memory-evoking ceremony.

ADAMS
(calmly, trying not
to show his great
anxiety)
Pete --

Pete looks up, a slight furrow on his brow.

ADAMS
I think you can help me. You used to
perform there --
(indicating with his
thumb)
-- didn't you? -- When it was
Hammerstein's...

PETE
(blankly)
Hammer --?

ADAMS
Hammerstein's -- the old theatre --

PETE
(vaguely)
Oh... oh, yes...

He smiles, a slight streak of memory illuminating his face.
The waitress brings Adams' coffee.

ADAMS
Thank you. Pete --

PETE
(rambling, seeming to
look through Adams
into the past)
I was good... Peter Bradford -- songs
and dances -- the best -- except
Georgie Cohan, maybe...

ADAMS
Pete, did you know --?

PETE
Always dropped in here between shows --
used to be a hat shop --
(cheerfully)
Helen Travis -- that was her name
before we were married...

ADAMS
(pressing)
Do you remember the Appletons, Pete?
A trapeze act?

PETE
Took her out of the shop and married
her... Appletons?

ADAMS
(trying to keep Pete's
memory in focus)
Yes -- they had a little girl -- you
remember, Pete...

PETE
I tried to keep out of trouble --
but money slipped right through my
fingers...

ADAMS
Pete -- try to --

PETE
Helen left me, you know... New Year's
Eve it was... couldn't work for a
long time... started to drink... got
to liking it after awhile, but -- no
taste for it now at all... don't you
like your coffee, sir?

ADAMS
Yes, it's fine, Pete -- but --

PETE
(helplessly)
What was I saying?

ADAMS
(desperately)
Pete -- please -- you must remember!
Did you know a little girl -- Jennie --
Jennie Appleton? You remember the
Appletons! A trapeze act, Pete...

PETE
(feeling a little
badly for Adams)
No... I don't remember... I'm sorry...

ADAMS
(defeated, softly)
I'm sorry, Pete... I didn't mean
to...

He sips his coffee, looking at Pete with a hopeless smile.
Pete gets over the feeling of being a little harassed, and
his mind wanders off again.

PETE
I used to talk to Clara about it --
after Helen left me... everybody did
when they were in trouble... she
knew everybody... knew everybody's
troubles...

During the last several words, Adams' hopes have been reborn.

ADAMS
Clara? Clara who, Pete? Where is she
now?

PETE
Wise woman, Clara... They're wise --
colored people... they know what
trouble is...

ADAMS
(almost wildly, forcing
Pete to be attentive)
Yes, Pete, yes! But tell me, please...
where can I find Clara? What's her
last name?

But Pete doesn't hear him and Adams' attempts are hopeless.
Pete's mind is still on his own tragedy.

PETE
You're all alone when your wife leaves
you...

Then, as though to illustrate this point, slowly, like an
automaton, Pete takes out his wallet, and removes a card
which he hands to Adams. During this Adams makes one final
attempt.

ADAMS
(pleadingly)
Listen to me... where's Clara?

Adams has taken the card during this last. He looks down at
it.

90C. AN ANGLE OVER ADAMS' SHOULDER

CAMERA MOVES DOWN to an insert of the card, which is rather
worn, but on which has been written in an old trembling hand:

"MY NAME IS PETER BRADFORD. IN CASE OF DEATH OR INJURY, PLEASE
NOTIFY CLARA B. MORGAN, 1346 SIXTH AVENUE."

DISSOLVE TO:

91. SMALL ROOM ON SIXTH AVENUE (BACK ROOM NOT FACING ON
SIXTH AVE.) CLOSE SHOT - CLARA MORGAN - DAY

She is a very handsome colored woman, quite old. Her face is
powerful and yet sensitive and intelligent. Her grey hair
lends an ageless dignity to her face.

CLARA
Of course, I remember the Appletons.
Frank and Mary Appleton. I remember
all of the old acts as if it were
yesterday.

As she speaks, CAMERA DRAWS BACK TO reveal a simply but
scrupulously clean, neat room. Through the window can be
seen falling snow. Adams is sitting in a chair, listening
intently.

CLARA
(continuing)
Eva Tanguay, Will Rogers, Weber and
Fields, the Appletons -- You know, I
think I have a picture of them
somewhere. Would you like to see it?

ADAMS
Oh, yes -- very much, Mrs. Morgan.

Clara rises and goes to an old trunk in the other side of
the room. Adams follows her as she digs into the trunk and
takes out some old photographs. She looks through them as
she talks.

CLARA
(as she looks)
They were all wonderful acts. For me
they had more glamor than anything
you see today. You sort of felt as
if you knew all the artists
personally. Ah, here it is.

She has found an old photograph which she takes out. Adams
leans forward eagerly.

92. INSERT - PHOTOGRAPH

It is covered with dust. As Clara rubs it off we see appear
a man and a woman posing stiffly against a "photographer's
column." In front, between them, stands Jennie, dressed as
we have seen her last, in her skating costume. Over the SHOT
we hear --

CLARA'S VOICE
Yes, these are the Appletons. Frank
and Mary Appleton.

ADAMS' VOICE
And -- the little girl?

93. TWO SHOT - CLARA AND ADAMS

As Adams takes the photograph.

CLARA
That's their daughter, Jennie.

ADAMS
(dazed)
Their -- daughter --

CLARA
Yes.

ADAMS
But this -- this picture must have
been taken many years ago.

CLARA
Yes -- many years ago.

ADAMS
It couldn't be that this -- this
child is their granddaughter?

CLARA
(almost with a little
laugh)
Oh, no. I knew Jennie when this
picture was taken. A darling little
girl -- with big, sad eyes. She used
to come back stage and sit on my
lap. I used to give her rock candy.
She was crazy about rock candy.

ADAMS
Do you know where she is now?

CLARA
No. I lost track of her after her
parents were killed that night on
the trapeze. That was many years
ago. Jack Boles came to the dressing
room and told me: 'The Appletons had
an accident,' he said. 'The wire
broke. They're both dead.'... Jennie
was in the theatre -- looking --
when it happened.

Pause. Slowly Adams hands the photograph back to her.

ADAMS
And you're sure you don't know what
happened to her?

CLARA
(thoughtfully)
Well -- it seems to me I do remember
there was some talk of her aunt's
wanting to put her into a convent.
Jennie wasn't a Catholic -- but her
aunt said a convent was the best
place for a girl to be.

ADAMS
(after a moment)
Well, thank you very much, Mrs.
Morgan. I appreciate your giving me
the time.

CLARA
(with a smile)
Thank you, Mr. Adams. It isn't very
often I have a chance to share my
memories... I hope you find Jennie.
She was a dear little girl.

ADAMS
I hope I do, too. Thank you. Goodbye,
Mrs. Morgan.

CLARA
Goodbye, Mr. Adams.

As he goes, Clara looks once more at the photograph and starts
to put it back into the old trunk, as we --

DISSOLVE TO:

94. CENTRAL PARK - LOW CAMERA - NIGHT

Adams walks along, looking from right to left anxiously. A
wind has risen. Mingled with the SOUND of the wind, we hear
the haunting melody of Jennie's theme song. Suddenly we hear
a weird sound that could or could not be the sound of the
trees. Adams stops and looks.

95. CLOSE SHOT - SWAYING TREES

96. ADAMS - CAMERA DOLLYING WITH HIM

He listens a moment, then moves on. There is a feverish
anxiety in his eyes. He slows down his walk, his instinct
making him believe that somehow Jennie is near. Suddenly he
stops abruptly as he looks down and ahead of him. We see
there is movement of shadows. We PULL BACK THE CAMERA (or
otherwise move the CAMERA) to reveal it is merely the shadow
of the trees.

97. ADAMS

As he sees what has caused the shadow. He starts again,
looking around. Faintly, but we can't be sure, there seems
to be the sound of sobbing mingled with the wind and the
MUSIC. He stops, and the sobbing stops. Adams calls softly:

ADAMS
Jennie... Jennie...
(looking around)

There's no answer. He takes another step or two, and the
sobbing becomes more distinct.

98. CLOSEUP - ADAMS

He is sure now, looks for the source of the sobbing and
follows it -- the CAMERA with him -- to the bench.

99. CLOSE SHOT - ADAMS - SHOOTING DOWN THE DARK PATH TO THE
BENCH WHERE THEY FIRST MET

-- and on which sits the figure of a little girl. It is from
her the sobs are coming -- long, broken sobs that shake her
body. Adams hurries to her.

ADAMS
Jennie --

He sits beside her, takes her hands. She turns to him and we
see that it is Jennie, helpless and heartbroken, unable to
control her sobs. She is in a different hair-do than when we
last saw her, and is about fourteen or fifteen.

ADAMS
What's the matter, dear? What are
you crying about?

JENNIE
(sobbing)
Father and Mother --

He looks, absorbs it for a second.

ADAMS
(almost afraid to
have it confirmed)
Something -- happened to them? They
had -- an accident?

JENNIE
(scarcely hearing
him, her words
overlapping his)
I knew it would happen --

ADAMS
The wire -- broke?

JENNIE
I knew it would happen -- I was always
scared it would happen -- and
tonight...

ADAMS
(almost to himself)
Tonight!

He can scarcely credit his ears. He has only just heard that
it was many years ago and here is proof that from Jennie's
standpoint it was tonight. But he pulls himself out of it,
for this child is clearly grief-stricken right now and brushes
off the mystery to comfort her.

ADAMS
I know how you feel, Jennie -- I
know how much it hurts -- But it
isn't hurting them. Try to think of
it that way.

Jennie's sobs have been gradually subsiding during his last
speech. They have now stopped and she looks up at him, dazed
and almost incredulous.

JENNIE
But they're -- dead --

ADAMS
We all die sometime --

JENNIE
(simply)
I loved them...
(looking up at him,
almost appealing for
understanding)
They loved me...

ADAMS
Then you mustn't be too unhappy,
Jennie. They wouldn't want you to
be, would they?

A pause. She looks at him, trying to understand. He adds,
gently --

ADAMS
Would they?

JENNIE
(slowly, puzzling
over it)
No... They told me once --

Pause.

ADAMS
Yes?

JENNIE
(her eyes go far away
as she remembers,
slowly, her parents'
cautionary advice)
They said -- if anything happened to
them -- I mustn't be unhappy --
because they were doing -- what they
wanted to do -- and if they --
(she stops)
-- if anything happened -- it would
happen to them both -- at the same
time -- the way they wanted --

ADAMS
You see?

JENNIE
(wonderingly, the
tempo of her words
gradually increasing)
Yes -- I shouldn't cry, should I?
They wouldn't like it. They died the
way they wanted. So I guess I'm only
crying for myself -- because they're
gone -- and because I'm lonely --

ADAMS
(touched)
Don't, Jennie.

JENNIE
(cutting in, not
hearing; her mood
changing gradually
to belief and
confidence)
But -- maybe I won't always be
lonely...
(her confidence is
growing and the words
are coming faster)
I don't know why -- but I don't think
I will be lonely very long...
(she turns to him,
looks at him eagerly)
Because I'm hurrying -- I'm hurrying
fast now. My aunt is sending me to a
convent.

ADAMS
(he remembers)
Yes... You want to go, don't you,
Jennie?

JENNIE
Of course I want to go. Then I'll be
grown up. Don't you understand?

Adams looks at her, understanding nothing.

ADAMS
(kindly)
No, Jennie -- I wish I could -- but
I don't understand. I don't understand
any of it. It's all so strange. Each
time I see you, you've changed --
you're older... You talk about things
that happened -- well, that happened
long ago.

JENNIE
(thinking, puzzled)
Did they? Sometimes I kind of think
that, too.
(then with an effort
at thought)
But maybe that's because I have to
find something --

ADAMS
(trying hard to
understand)
Find something? Find what?

JENNIE
(she seems a little
more mature as
increasing confidence
takes over from her
puzzlement)
I'm not sure. But I think I'll know
some day -- I think I'll know when I
find it...
(then with sudden
decision rising and
facing him)
You know something? I think you'll
know, too.

ADAMS
(with a little, puzzled
smile and a sigh,
decides not to argue
further)
I hope so.

JENNIE
(pleading, childlike)
You'll wait for me, won't you? You'll
give me a little more time --

ADAMS
(rising; with a tender,
tolerant smile)
All right, Jennie.

JENNIE
(suddenly)
Listen...

He looks at her strangely as she looks around for the source
of what she hears from one side to the other then up. After
a moment we see that she has discovered the source and she
smiles a little.

100. SLIFER SHOT OF THE SKY AND THE STARS

101.-102. BACK TO SCENE (ALSO COVER WITH CLOSEUPS)

JENNIE
It's the stars... can't you hear
them?
(she cocks her head
slightly)
Listen! Listen to the stars coming
out...

During this Adams has looked up. CAMERA MOVES UP TO HIM.
There is a wistful, puzzled expression on his face.

ADAMS
(without moving, almost
in a whisper)
Jennie --?

There is no answer. We see on his face that he knows she is
gone. CAMERA PULLS SLOWLY BACK to reveal him alone. Jennie
is not there. Slowly he lowers his head, turns, retreats,
his shadow long behind him. His head still down, he walks
slowly out of view. His shadow follows him, as we

FADE OUT:

FADE IN:

103. THE TREES IN THE PARK AND THE SKY BEYOND

The trees are still bare and it looks cold and desolate.

SPINNEY'S VOICE
Cold, cold months followed each other
that year. Winter hung on to the
earth with a bitter grip.

DISSOLVE TO:

104. SHOT OF NEW YORK AND CARNEGIE HALL (STOCK SHOT)

People are seen going in hurriedly, muffled up against the
cold.

SPINNEY'S VOICE
The cold settled into people's bones
and a chill crept around their hearts.

DISSOLVE TO:

105. INT. CARNEGIE HALL CONCERT

The hall is full.

SPINNEY'S VOICE
But you didn't seem to feel the cold,
Eben.

106. TWO SHOT - SPINNEY AND ADAMS

We see that Adams' face is happy, eager and excited.

SPINNEY'S VOICE
You seemed to have some inner warmth
of your own.

DISSOLVE TO:

107. FIFTH AVENUE - SUNDAY - CHURCH BELLS ARE RINGING -

Spinney and Adams walking along.

SPINNEY'S VOICE
It was as though some deeper, inner
meaning had been revealed to you --
you had some insight that I couldn't
share --

DISSOLVE TO:

108. ADAMS' STUDIO

Adams -- painting -- whistling, but the CAMERA angle is such
that we don't see what he is painting.

SPINNEY'S VOICE
-- it was as though the gates had
been opened and you had looked into
some world that renewed your faith
in life and in yourself.

DISSOLVE TO:

109. THE TREES IN THE PARK

Still bare, but the sun is shining brightly.

SPINNEY'S VOICE
-- but then -- Spring at last began
to break through -- the sun began to
shine more warmly --

DISSOLVE TO:

NO SCENES 110-112

Sequence omitted from original script.

113. THE TREES

With buds on them, and beyond a very blue sky. The CAMERA
SLOWLY PANS across the trees and starts to SLOWLY PAN DOWN --

SPINNEY'S VOICE
-- the trees were covered with little
yellow green leaves -- and the sky
was a different blue -- and the clouds
were a different white. And a robin
sang. But you didn't awaken to the
warmth of spring, Eben. You became
restless, despondent -- almost
melancholy. What was it, Eben? I was
worried about you. All of your new-
found eagerness toward life was gone.
You wouldn't work -- you seemed
lifeless. What were you searching
for? I couldn't understand. The actual
truth never occurred to me. How could
it have? I wept for you, Eben.

The CAMERA HAS PANNED DOWN FROM THE TREES TO SHOW THE TAVERN
ON THE GREEN, and we see Adams and Spinney seated at a table.

SPINNEY
(brusquely)
Really, Adams, I lose patience with
you sometimes.

ADAMS
All right, Spinney, I know. Sorry I
can't be a little brighter for you.

SPINNEY
What if you don't know where this
Jennie is? There are other people --
other things to paint.

ADAMS
Name me three.

SPINNEY
(disgusted)
Oh, good heavens! Look, Adams -- I'm
the last one to say that a painter
mustn't have some -- some inspiration --
but that's not the same thing as
mooning about -- not even trying.

ADAMS
How do you know I'm not trying?

SPINNEY
You haven't set a brush to canvas
for months!

ADAMS
Haven't I?

SPINNEY
Have you?

ADAMS
(with a grin)
No.

SPINNEY
Try it! Put a brush in your hand -
and see what happens. You'd be
surprised how many ideas have come
to people that way. You're not giving
yourself a chance.

ADAMS
It's no good, Spinney. I'm sorry.
I've got this idea in my head that
I've got to paint Jennie and --

SPINNEY
Who is this Jennie, anyway? You must
know where she lives -- something
about her -- there must be some way
to find her.

ADAMS
No way that I know.

SPINNEY
Advertise.
(A moment's pause.
Adams looks at her)

ADAMS
Spinney -- remember the little lecture
you gave me once? About artists
doubting their own abilities?

SPINNEY
Well?

ADAMS
Well, I no longer have any doubt.
It's all gone.

SPINNEY
Really? Well, that is a relief!

ADAMS
Yeah. Now I know I'm no good.

SPINNEY
(let down)
Oh!

ADAMS
Unless --

SPINNEY
Unless what?

ADAMS
Unless I find Jennie. I know -- Jennie
may seem like just another child --
but there's more -- a lot more --
that I can't explain. I can't explain
it, but I know I can put it on canvas.
And I can't do anything else until I
do.

A pause. Then --

SPINNEY
(angry, putting her
napkin down)
That does it!
(she rises)

ADAMS
Don't be angry, Spinney.

SPINNEY
(standing)
I'm always angry at self-indulgence!
Just because you have a talent --
that's no excuse not to do your job
like any other man. Stop pampering
yourself. Good... bye...

She leaves angrily. Adams looks after her, then lowers his
head and starts playing with his fork.

DISSOLVE TO:

114. INT. HALL ADAMS' BOARDING HOUSE

as Adams trudges in. He doesn't try to be quiet as before --
he is too preoccupied. Sitting in the little room just off
the hall, is Mrs. Jekes and her friend. As Adams comes in he
stops a moment at the door. Mrs. Jekes rises.

ADAMS
Has anyone been here to see me, Mrs.
Jekes?

MRS. JEKES
(turning to the little
elderly woman)
Just a moment, Mr. Adams. I'll ask
my social secretary. Has anyone been
here to see Mr. Adams, Mrs. Delaney?

Mrs. Delaney sniggers with delight and shakes her head.

MRS. JEKES
(to Adams)
Mrs. Delaney says she doesn't know.
And I'm sure I wouldn't know either,
Mr. Adams.

ADAMS
No. That's right. How would you know?

He turns and starts up the stairs, the women looking after
him.

MRS. DELANEY
(giggling)
Oh, you are a card, Mrs. Jekes.

MRS. JEKES
Sometimes I wonder if it's worth it.

MRS. DELANEY
What?

MRS. JEKES
Having a gentleman in the house. So
far he's cost me sixty dollars.

Automatically she puts her fingers into the pay telephone.
She draws back in happy surprise, looking at the nickel in
her hand.

DISSOLVE TO:

115. ADAMS' STUDIO

as he enters. He stands surveying the room forlornly. He
walks over and looks out of the window. He turns and takes
up a number of sketches and looks at them -- sketches of
Jennie. He throws them down. He goes to a table and stares
down at a half-eaten can of beans with a spoon in it. He
takes a spoonful -- looks at it -- and puts it down. He goes
to his drafting board on which there is a paper. He starts
to sketch -- a bridge -- then stops. Suddenly he has an idea.
He looks around and gets a large canvas and starts to prepare
it, -- stretching it, mounting it, wetting it, and setting
it out to dry. As he is doing so, there is a knock on the
door. He looks up eagerly.

ADAMS
Come in.

Gus enters. Adams is disappointed. He turns back to his work.

ADAMS
Oh, hello, Gus.

GUS
Howya, Mack? Watcha doing?

ADAMS
(irritably)
What do you think I'm doing?

GUS
I dunno.

ADAMS
I'm preparing a canvas for a portrait.

GUS
What do you know! So that's the way
you do it!

ADAMS
That's the way you do it.

There is a pause. Gus is uncomfortable. Then --

GUS
Speaking of painting --

ADAMS
I know, I know. Moore is sore because
I haven't finished that mural.

GUS
After all -- he made a deal --

ADAMS
-- and I let him down.

GUS
(with a smile)
Well, Mic Collins is beginnin' to
look a little sore, too, Mack --
leanin' there on his gun -- waitin'
to lead his men into battle -- and
havin' only half a leg to stand on --

ADAMS
(irritably)
Okay -- okay -- I get it.

A pause. Gus looks at him a moment, then turns and begins to
wander around the room, looking at the various sketches,
etc. Then he begins to sing his lilting Irish song. He
finishes, looks at Adams once more, and then starts to the
door.

GUS
Well, see you later, Mack.

He starts to go out. Adams straightens up.

ADAMS
Gus.
(Gus stops and turns)
I'm sorry. Guess I'm in a rotten
mood these days. Tell Moore I'll be
over, will you? I'll finish it
somehow.

GUS
Sure.

ADAMS
(smiling suddenly)
Thanks. And, Gus -- I don't want to
seem ungrateful...

GUS
Why, that's all right, Mack. There's
times a big black cloud comes down
over all of us. Be seein' you.

He goes out whistling, as we

DISSOLVE TO:

116. INT. MOORE'S RESTAURANT - EVENING

Adams is at work putting the last finishing touches to his
mural of Michael Collins. Several people are seated at the
tables drinking beer: regular patrons and people who have
heard about it and come to watch. There are also several
people at the bar. There are several Irish cops in various
places, watching. There is a general hubbub as the scene
opens.

117. CLOSE SHOT BAR - MOORE AND GUS

MOORE
(delighted)
You were right, Gus. It's a grand
paintin!!! A grand paintin!!! Just
look at all the people buyin' beer.

GUS
That's what I told you, Mack. You
got patriotism, art and beer all at
the same time.

118. CLOSE SHOT - ARNE - AT A TABLE NEAR THE BAR

He has his elbow on his knee, chin in hand, and is watching
the painting, critically. We hear Moore's voice.

MOORE'S VOICE
(happily)
Yes -- a beautiful paintin'... isn't
it now?

Arne turns and gives him a slow, disgusted look, then turns
back to his former position, watching the painting.

119. FULL SHOT - ROOM

The crowd is muttering happily, guzzling happily. Suddenly
Adams throws down his brush.

ADAMS
Well, there it is! Finished!

All look at the painting in silence, then look from one to
another, wordlessly.

120. GUS

Glancing around expectantly. He looks at Moore.

121. MOORE

Worried by the silence.

122. ADAMS

Looking disgusted and somewhat uncomfortable.

123. GUS

He thinks a moment, gets an idea, then starts to applaud.

124. MED. LONG SHOT

As the on-lookers join in the applause enthusiastically.
During the applause we hear:

AD LIBS
Mic Collins! The spittin' image of
him! Michael Collins would be a proud
man this moment! Erin go bragh! Any
Irishman that doesn't come to see
this is no friend of mine!

125. MOORE

Beaming.

126. GUS

As the applause subsides, Gus looks again, gets an idea and
starts to sing "The Soldiers' Song."

127. ANOTHER ANGLE OF THE CROWD (or PULL BACK CAMERA)

As the crowd takes it up with a roar, not as a trained chorus,
but joining in one by one.

128. ADAMS

Embarrassed by this demonstration.

129. FULL SHOT

NOTE: Shoot the song so that we can end it at the end of the
refrain or at the end of the chorus.

As the song ends, there is more applause. Adams makes his
way through the crowd to Moore and Arne. Gus joins them.

130. MEDIUM SHOT - THE GROUP

ADAMS
Well, I hope you're satisfied, Mr.
Moore.

MOORE
Satisfied! It's a mighty proud man I
am to have the picture there, Mr.
Adams. Now I've been thinkin' -- on
the wall over there we might have a
scene of the Mighty Emmet -- in his
green and white uniform -- with the
English fleein' in terror over the
hills --

GUS
(looking at Adams)
Hey, wait a minute, Mack. Mack's in
no mood to talk about more paintin'...
(turning to Adams)
It's a swell job.

MOORE
A grand job.

ADAMS
I'm glad you like it.
(he turns to Arne)
What do you think of it, Arne?

ARNE
It stinks.

GUS
(a little belligerently)
Yeah? That the way you feel about
it?

ADAMS
(with a wry smile)
I think it stinks too.

He moves out of scene. They look after him as he exits from
the cafe. There's a moment's silence.

GUS
You know something? Your picture
don't stink.

ARNE
(holding it up, pleased)
You like it?

GUS
Swell. I think it's swell.

ARNE
(with ample gesture)
My friend, it's yours!

GUS
You mean you're giving it to me,
just like that?

ARNE
Just like that. For nothing.

GUS
(raising his voice)
Bring the gentleman a beer, Mack.
(to ARNE)
I don't take nothing for nothing.

Mack serves a glass of beer to ARNE, which he raises to his
lips in salute to Gus, the man of the people who appreciates
his art.

GUS
Is it mine now?

ARNE
My friend, it's yours!

Gus takes the picture and starts deliberately to tear it
into pieces. Arne, in a rage of insulted pride, starts for
him, murder in his eye. Gus is ready.

MOORE
Gentlemen, gentlemen -- whatever can
ye be thinkin' of? Why --
(indicating painting)
-- it's insultin' to Mic Collins...

Gus is torn between patriotism and going after Arne. The
patriot wins, and as he turns back to his beer, we

DISSOLVE TO:

NO SCENES 131-134

Sequence omitted from original script.

135. CENTRAL PARK - NIGHT

Adams, all alone, walks along past the recognizable park
bench -- pauses a moment -- then walks on.

DISSOLVE TO:

136. THE WATERFRONT - THE SKY IS LIGHTER

We see the lonely figure of Adams walking along, looking out
at the boats, solitary, mournful.

DISSOLVE TO:

137. HALL IN ADAMS' HOUSE - DAWN

As Adams enters, whipped, tired and about at the end. He
starts up the stairs.

138. HALLWAY OUTSIDE ADAMS' DOOR

Door is ajar. He approaches hopefully but fearful, reaches
out his hand for the knob. He opens the door, steps in, and
suddenly stops in his tracks, frozen, staring.

139. ADAMS' STUDIO - SHOOTING OVER HIS BACK - DOWN AT THE
FLOOR

Adams' sketches are spread out on the floor, and we see a
girl's hands.

140. CLOSEUP - ADAMS

Incredulous, he takes a step forward.

141. MED. CLOSE SHOT - JENNIE

On all fours -- or seated on the floor -- as she slowly raises
her head to him. She is very beautiful in her convent dress.
Her beauty is that of a girl of seventeen. As she looks up
at Adams her eyes are aglow. Over this we hear:

ADAMS' VOICE
Jennie!...

JENNIE
(eagerly)
Yes --

PULL CAMERA BACK as Adams rushes forward to her. Jennie rises
and rushes to him eagerly.

ADAMS
It's not true! It isn't you!

He takes her hands in his.

JENNIE
Oh, yes, yes, yes it is... see!
(she turns her face
up to his)
I tried to get here sooner but I
couldn't.

ADAMS
Here -- let me look at you.

He holds her hands out wide, looking at her. Jennie smiles.

ADAMS
(astonished)
Why, you're beautiful.

JENNIE
Am I?

ADAMS
You've grown.

JENNIE
Of course. I'm nearly a young lady
now. I'm hurrying. I'm in my first
year of college at the convent.

ADAMS
Oh, that's wonderful, Jennie.

He has still been holding her hands. He holds her from him
and looks her over from head to toe. Then, admiringly:

ADAMS
That dress...

JENNIE
(girlishly pleased)
Do you like it? It's our Sunday dress.

ADAMS
It's enchanting.

JENNIE
(coming closer to
him, suddenly eager
and impulsive)
Oh, I've thought of you so much. It
could --
(reaching for the
right expression)
-- it could fill an eternity.

ADAMS
(with a smile)
What have you thought?

JENNIE
About how wonderful it all is --
about how I've searched and searched,
and now --

ADAMS
Yes, Jennie?

JENNIE
How we'll be together always. I'm
almost sure...
(then, childlike)
You know what Emily wants to know?

ADAMS
What?

JENNIE
Whether you're going to marry me.

He laughs.

JENNIE
(pouting, a bit wounded)
Please don't laugh at me... Eben.
(it's the first time
she's used his name,
and she uses it
tentatively)
I know I'm not old enough yet, but I
will be soon...
(her eyes spot
something)
What's that?

Adams, who has been swept away by her mercurial moods, is
amused and puzzled.

ADAMS
What?

JENNIE
That sketch.

ADAMS
(looking at the sketch)
That's Radio City.

JENNIE
(dubiously)
Radio City?... I never heard of it.

ADAMS
(realizing)
Oh -- well -- it's new, I guess...
hasn't been built long.

JENNIE
(vaguely)
Oh...

Her eyes fall on another sketch. She shudders and mutters a
startled and frightened "Oh!"

ADAMS
(concerned)
What is it, Jennie?

JENNIE
(pointing as though
to a horrible thing
that she knows)
That's -- Land's End Light!

142. INSERT - SKETCH OF LAND'S END LIGHT

ADAM'S VOICE
(puzzled)
Yes... Land's End Light...

143. ADAMS AND JENNIE

He is watching her with a penetrating look.

ADAMS
I sketched it several years ago.
It's a deserted lighthouse -- up on
Cape Cod.

JENNIE
It makes me -- unhappy --

ADAMS
(still watching her)
Have you ever been there?

JENNIE
(vaguely)
Perhaps -- I don't know...

She dismisses this unpleasant subject from her mind and looks
in the direction of the window, turns, and walks to the
window.

JENNIE
Look -- it's getting lighter. I'm
afraid I must leave soon.

ADAMS
(frantic)
No -- no, Jennie. You can't -- now
that I've found you --

JENNIE
(gently)
I'll be here again, Eben.

ADAMS
But that's not right. I've waited
and waited -- You can't go now --
(He notices the canvas
that he has prepared)
Look, Jennie -- The canvas -- I have
it all prepared --
(Jennie looks at the
canvas as Adams goes
on excitedly)
I was sure you'd be here some day.
The portrait of you, Jennie -- the
one we planned --

JENNIE
(excited)
Oh, Eben, will you do it?

ADAMS
I've not been able to do anything
else. Will you stay?

JENNIE
(with a gentle little
smile)
I'll try to stay for a little while...

ADAMS
Sit there, Jennie. There where I've
dreamed you would sit...

JENNIE
The girls will be so jealous when I
tell them.

Jennie, as she is getting into position, chatters away, while
Adams hastily goes about the business of preparing the paints
and getting ready for the portrait.

JENNIE
You know, some of my friends are
taking the veil next Sunday. It will
be lovely to watch. Will you come
and see it with me?

144. CLOSEUP - JENNIE IN CHAIR

She is sitting with her head turned.

ADAMS' VOICE
I'd love to... Turn your head a little
more to the left, Jennie.

She does so.

JENNIE
(with sudden sadness)
A few of my classmates will be
leaving. I hate to have them go.
I'll miss them.

ADAMS' VOICE
Drop your arms into your lap.

She does so. As the directions come and Jennie moves obeying
them, we see her finally form into the position we have seen
in the final portrait early in the picture. SLOWLY THE CAMERA
STARTS TO DRAW BACK and, as Jennie finally assumes the correct
position, we see Adams -- the bare canvas in front of him --
crayon in hand raised to make the first stroke.

ADAMS
(tensely)
That's it -- that's right, Jennie --
Hold that --

The crayon comes down in the first stroke for the portrait,
as we

DISSOLVE TO:

145. THE BRUSH - NIGHT

We see the brush working frantically on the canvas. CAMERA
PULLS BACK and we see Adams, alone, painting the dress of
the portrait rapidly. Jennie's face is practically complete.
Outside the rain beats against the window. CAMERA MOVES IN
again to the brush, as we

DISSOLVE TO:

NO SCENES 146-152

Sequence omitted from original script.

153. LONG SHOT - EXT. CONVENT - ENTRANCE - DAY - (SPRING)

(already shot)

Out of the door tumbles a large group of young girls, dressed
very much in the same manner as Jennie was dressed when we
saw her last.

A nun tries to bring order in this tumult of voices and
giggling. We cannot understand her commands, but we can see
her waving her arms furiously and the girls lining up two
abreast. At a final command, they start marching in double
file down the hill. The nun walks at the end of the line.
CAMERA DRAWS BACK TO:

154. MED. SHOT - ADAMS

(already shot)

He is at the side of the path, waiting for the girls to
approach, watching them.

155. MEDIUM LONG SHOT

(already shot)

of the girls approaching, with Adams in the foreground. We
can soon see their young, wide-eyed faces closely.

156. CLOSE SHOT OF GIRLS

(already shot)

passing by. They are marching silently, looking straight
ahead while Adams stands at the side of the path, searching
among their faces for Jennie. She is not there. The girls go
on.

157. MEDIUM LONG SHOT

(already shot)

Adams is gazing after the girls walking away. A slight puzzled
frown comes to his face. He turns and walks away.

158. LONG SHOT - CONVENT SHOOTING PAST ADAMS

(already shot)

He walks toward the entrance.

159. MED. SHOT - A CORRIDOR

(already shot)

as Adams enters and looks around, tentatively. He has become
more worried as he looks around. Then, suddenly, we hear:

JENNIE'S VOICE
(reverberated -- from
a distance)
Hello!

He looks around quickly.

160. CLOSE SHOT - ADAMS

(already shot)

As he looks around. Again we hear:

JENNIE'S VOICE
(reverberated -- closer) Hello!

161. CLOSE TWO SHOT - ADAMS AND JENNIE

(already shot)

Jennie is dressed in her white convent dress. She looks
radiant and more beautiful than ever, a little more grown
up.

ADAMS
(with a sigh of relief)
Jennie! I was afraid -- afraid you
might not be here.

JENNIE
Why, I told you I'd be here.

ADAMS
I know but -- but I had the feeling --
something might have happened --

JENNIE
(interrupting)
Hush!
(She listens intently)

The sound of singing and organ music can be heard.

JENNIE
(continuing)
Do you hear that?
(She takes his hand)
We'd better hurry if we want to see
it.

162. LONG SHOT

(already shot)

Jennie and Adams walk through the vaulted passage toward the
convent gardens. The premises are completely deserted -- all
the sisters are assembled inside the chapel for the
consecration ceremony.

A chorus of voices, singing the TE DEUM can now be heard
more clearly.

163. FULL SHOT - EXT. CONVENT GARDENS - DAY - (SUMMER)

(already shot)

Jennie and Adams hurriedly cross the gardens in the direction
of the chapel. The music grows louder, the words of the TE
DEUM more distinct.

164. CLOSE SHOT - ENTRANCE OF CHAPEL

(already shot)

Carefully, Jennie opens the door, pushes Adams inside and
follows him.

165. FULL SHOT - INT. CHAPEL - DAY - (SUMMER)

(already shot)

Bathed in a sea of candles around the altar, we see a group
of novices dressed in white veils, waiting for the
consecration.

The Sisters of the Order are standing in their pews, singing
the TE DEUM. The guests and parents are seated on one side
of the chapel.

166. CLOSE SHOT - ADAMS AND JENNIE

(already shot)

as they kneel down next to each other.

JENNIE
(whispering)
Isn't it beautiful? I always feel a
little closer to the truth of things
in here. As if pretty soon I would
understand -- See -- those are the
ones who are taking the veil.

167. MED. CLOSE GROUP SHOT OF NOVICES

(already shot)

near the altar. Their faces are young and radiant.

168. CLOSE SHOT

(already shot)

of Adams and Jennie.

JENNIE
(whispering)
Our teachers are all in the first
row. There's old Sister Mary
Margaret...

169. PAN SHOT

(already shot)

of front row of benches. As Jennie speaks CAMERA PANS slowly
along the faces of the Sisters.

JENNIE'S VOICE
(continuing)
She teaches history. And Sister Mary
Euphemia who teaches science and
next to her is my favorite, Sister
Mary of Mercy.

HOLD ON the face of Sister Mary of Mercy.

170. CLOSE SHOT - ADAMS AND JENNIE

(already shot)

Jennie looks up at Adams. Their eyes meet.

JENNIE
(slowly)
I'm glad you're waiting for me, Eben.

As they look at each other, the priest begins the intonation
of The Lord's Prayer:

PRAYER
Our Father Which Art in Heaven
Hallowed Be Thy Name Thy Kingdom
Come Thy Will Be Done On Earth As It
is In Heaven Give us This Day Our
Daily Bread And Forgive Us Our
Transgressions As We Forgive Our
Transgressors And Lead Us Not Into
Temptation But Deliver Us From Evil
For Thine Is The Kingdom And The
Power, And the Glory Forever.
Amen.

Congregation responds during the above.

171. TWO SHOT - ADAMS AND JENNIE

(already shot)

Adams and Jennie kneel and join the congregation in the
response.

(NOTE: This has been checked with Father Finnley and will be
supervised by him. There should be an alternate dissolve
eliminating the prayer for England, where the censors will
eliminate the prayer.)

DISSOLVE TO:

171A. A LITTLE BROOK - SHOOTING DOWN ON THE RIPPLING BROOK
THROUGH THE TREES

CAMERA drifts along the brook - accompanied by musical
underscoring -- until we reach Adams under a tree, playing
his mouth organ. CAMERA CONTINUES and we see Jennie wading,
barefoot, in the water.

JENNIE
Your music sounds just like the brook,
Eben --
(he plays on)
Ripple -- ripple -- ripple --

Suddenly, in the brook, she starts to do a little dance to
the music. Adams watches her, stops a moment.

ADAMS
And your dance is like the music.

He continues to play and she continues to improvise in her
little dance.

DISSOLVE TO:

171B. JENNIE AND ADAMS - SILHOUETTED AGAINST THE SUNSET -
CONVENT BUILDINGS BEYOND

They stand looking at the sunset over the river.

171C. CLOSER ANGLE - AND PERHAPS A REVERSE, SHOWING RIVER
BEYOND; ALSO INDIVIDUALS

After a moment:

JENNIE
I'm just beginning to realize how
beautiful the world is, Eben. How
spring comes year after year -- for
us -- and for everyone the whole
world over. The sun goes down in the
same lovely sky -- just as it did
yesterday -- and will tomorrow.

ADAMS
Tomorrow? When is tomorrow?

JENNIE
Does it matter? It's always. This
was tomorrow -- once.

ADAMS
Where I come from, Nobody knows, And
where I'm going --

Jennie looks up, surprised.

JENNIE
I've heard that somewhere.

ADAMS
Of course! You sang it to me that
first day in the park.

JENNIE
Oh, did I? I had forgotten.

ADAMS
The wind blows, The sea flows,
(he shrugs)
And God knows.

JENNIE
I think He knows, Eben.

A slight pause.

ADAMS
I hate the day to end.

JENNIE
It'll be here again tomorrow.

DISSOLVE TO:

172. ADAMS' STUDIO - LONG SHOT BRIDGE THROUGH WINDOW - PULL
BACK TO INTERIOR

The room is empty for a moment, and then the door opens and
Spinney, Mathews and Adams come in. Adams is in a rather
excited mood.

ADAMS
Just put your things down anywhere.
Here, Spinney, I'll take that --

MATTHEWS
(looking around)
So this is where the master works --

ADAMS
Not much of a place is it? -- Now,
look -- you know it isn't finished!

SPINNEY
Don't be coy. Let's see it.

ADAMS
(boyish)
All right, then -- sit down, Spinney --
(he goes to the easel
that holds the
portrait. He is
nervous)
Of course, there're still a great
many things I want to do with it --
(He takes a deep breath)
Here we go.

He makes a decision and turns the canvas to them -- uncovers
the portrait. There it is!

(NOTE: Dramatic revelation with CAMERA)

Pause. Mathews walks slowly up to it and looks at it. There
is a longer pause. Adams watches him anxiously.

MATTHEWS
Well -- Well --

Pause. Spinney rises and goes over to it.

ADAMS
(to Mathews, nervously)
What do you think?

MATTHEWS
H'mm -- h'mm --

He studies it more closely. Spinney looks at it. A pause.
Adams looks at her. After a moment --

SPINNEY
(in a strangely gentle
voice)
Well, Adams, that's it all right.

MATTHEWS
(clearing his throat)
Yes -- yes, that's it.

SPINNEY
You found what you were looking for.

ADAMS
Of course it isn't finished --

MATTHEWS
(softly)
No -- it doesn't really matter --
does it --?

ADAMS
You like it then?

A pause. Adams looks at Mathews, we see Mathews is very
touched

MATTHEWS
You see, Adams, in the fifty years
I've been selling paintings -- well
in my business it's always a dream
that someday you will come across --
shall we say -- a great picture.
This is -- I feel now a sort of
fulfillment of my -- well -- of my --
(he stops, unable to
go on)

SPINNEY
He means he likes it, Adams.

Adams gives a deep sigh.

ADAMS
(simply)
I'm glad.

MATTHEWS
You remember my saying that there
ought to be something eternal about
a woman -- something that is not of
the present, nor of the past? Well,
here you have caught it -- It is the
face of that same little girl -- and
yet what you have seen in that face
is without age -- or time.

SPINNEY
(with a small smile)
Of course it isn't finished yet --

ADAMS
(turning to her
nervously)
No, it isn't --

SPINNEY
Take it easy, Adams. It's a great
picture.

She smiles. Adams smiles back. A door slams. They turn around
and see Arne.

ARNE
Excuse me for bursting in like this,
but I know how glad you always are
to see me.

ADAMS
(approaching him)
That's all right, Arne. Come in. You
know Miss Spinney, Mr. Mathews.
(to Mathews and Spinney)
My friend, Arne, has a new technique --
paints only with his thumbs.

Mathews and Spinney look at each other.

ARNE
Thumbs! That's old stuff. It's passe --
fini. And that brings me to the point
of my visit: I'm turning to brushes
again. Could you spare me -- say,
half a dozen brushes, by any chance?

ADAMS
Of course.
(as he goes to pick
up a bunch of brushes
and wraps them in
paper)
I have lots of them.

ARNE
My friend, you have a good heart, a
noble soul, lots of brushes, but --
(with a gesture)
-- no talent.
(he sighs)
If I roll up my sleeves and out of
sheer gratitude give you a couple of
lessons in painting --
(he picks up a sketch
or looks at one on
the wall)
No, it wouldn't help.

SPINNEY
(puts her hand on
Arne's shoulder)
Look behind you and see what you
think of that.

Arne looks at her a moment, puzzled. Then turns, which brings
him face to face with the painting.

ARNE
What's this?

SPINNEY
Just a painting.

A pause. Arne stares at it, not believing his eyes. Slowly
he approaches it as though hypnotized. He looks at it
carefully, then slowly looks up at Adams.

ARNE
It's a masterpiece.
(quietly, sincerely)
I can't believe it... But yes, it's
a masterpiece.
(he looks again at
the picture, wipes a
sudden, cold
perspiration from
behind his collar,
rubs his forehead in
painful agony; quietly)
Say, have you an aspirin, by any
chance?

DISSOLVE TO:

173. LONG SHOT - EXT. CENTRAL PARK - NIGHT - SUMMER

Adams is walking slowly along. He seems very happy and
content. As he walks we hear him humming Jennie's theme song.
The Park is deserted. The arc lamps are throwing bizarre
shadows across the road. He stops for a moment to look out
over the lake -- then slowly goes on.

174. MED. SHOT

as he continues his quiet walk, still humming. He approaches
the CAMERA. Suddenly he stops and looks and then hurries
forward.

PAN WITH HIM toward the bench -- and gradually, as Adams
gets closer, we see -- out of the shadows -- rising - the
figure of a girl, Jennie. She is simply but beautifully
dressed in a travelling outfit. She is the most grown up we
have seen her. Her hair is up and we realize she is no longer
anything of a child. Adams stops a few feet away from her.

ADAMS
Jennie!

JENNIE
Eben...
(they throw their
arms around each
other)
Somehow I knew I'd find you here.

ADAMS
I've looked for you here so often.

JENNIE
I had to see you -- tonight. You
know I've just graduated from college
and --

ADAMS
(excitedly, breaking
in)
Wonderful! Then -- we can be together
always.

JENNIE
I'm afraid we'll have to wait a little
while longer. You see, my aunt is
ill and wants me to go away with her
for the summer.

ADAMS
(disappointed)
Oh -- When do you have to leave?

JENNIE
Tomorrow... I couldn't go without
saying goodbye.

ADAMS
Goodbye?

JENNIE
It will only be for a few months.
Anyway, we have until the morning --
and -- I think a little more.

A little pause. They look at each other.

ADAMS
I'll be lost without you.

JENNIE
No, no -- Don't say that, Eben! We
can't both of us be lost.

Slowly he goes to her.

ADAMS
Jennie --

JENNIE
Yes, Eben?

She waits. He takes her hands.

ADAMS
I love you.

JENNIE
Do you? Do you really?

ADAMS
I've always loved you. I always will
love you -- always and forever...

They kiss.

DISSOLVE TO:

175. EMBANKMENT AT THE EDGE OF THE HUDSON RIVER - NIGHT

We see the broad expanse of the Hudson, the moon playing on
it here and there. Across, on the opposite side, the banks
of New Jersey.

JENNIE AND ADAMS sit on the bank, looking out over the river.

JENNIE
Look at the moonlight on the water.
It makes a pathway across the river...
(then with a sigh)
The Jersey hills are over there,
aren't they?

ADAMS
Yes, in the distance.

JENNIE
You say it sadly. Aren't you happy,
Eben?

ADAMS
(after a moment)
I've just been thinking... No matter
how far away that kind of distance
is, it can always be reached. Over
there -- beyond the hills -- one can
drive to it -- or north, among the
pines -- or eastward to the sea.
That is the only kind of distance I
ever knew before. But now --
(he hesitates)

JENNIE
Yes, Eben?

ADAMS
Now I feel there is another kind of
distance. A crueler distance. The
distance of yesterday and tomorrow.
And I am frightened that there's no
way to bridge it.

JENNIE
There is, Eben -- at this moment, I
know there is.

ADAMS
But I want it to be forever.

JENNIE
(softly)
It will be... Have faith.

He kisses her cheek. A pause.

ADAMS
Where's your aunt taking you, Jennie?

JENNIE
Somewhere in New England. I don't
know exactly.

ADAMS
Will you write and let me know?

JENNIE
I'll try, Eben.

He looks at her, studying her eyes a moment, trying to have
faith, and trying to read in her eyes something that will
make him believe what reason tells him can't be true. He
takes her in his arms and buries his head on her shoulder.

DISSOLVE TO:

176. BRYANT PARK

The streets are deserted.

177. JENNIE AND ADAMS -

walking quietly along.

JENNIE
How still it is! Listen!
(They stop, listening.
There is no sound)
The whole city -- sleeping -- sleeping --
no one but us left in the world --

ADAMS
No one but us --

JENNIE
(smiling up at him as
they start on)
Dear Eben -- dear Eben --

DISSOLVE TO:

178. OTHER NEW YORK LOCATION - OVERLOOKING EAST RIVER

Although it is still dark, a faint gray is showing in the
sky. Adams and Jennie stand looking out at the river. A boat
hoots, another answers, but there is no life on the shore
yet. Only on the river is there activity.

JENNIE
Life's beginning again --

ADAMS
Yes, it will soon be day.

JENNIE
Look -- that little boat put its
lights out.

ADAMS
The night's over. It's tomorrow.
(looks down at her)
Jennie --

JENNIE
Yes, Eben?

ADAMS
I'm not going to think of the summer --
or of the future at all. I leave
that to you.

JENNIE
I know, darling.

ADAMS
Why we met -- or how it came about --
I don't know.

JENNIE
I know we were meant for each other.
The strands of our lives are woven
together -- and neither time nor the
world can tear them apart.
(they look at each
other a moment. Then --)
Eben -- I wish you could finish my
portrait.

As they start off.

DISSOLVE TO:

179. ADAMS' STUDIO - DAY

Jennie is seated as we have seen her before. Adams is painting
rapidly. There is a pause as the work goes on. Then --

JENNIE
Eben --
(Adams is so engrossed
he doesn't hear. A
pause)
Been --

ADAMS
Yes, darling?

JENNIE
Do you think sometimes people can
know what lies ahead? I mean -- what's
going to happen to them?

ADAMS
(busy painting)
No, Jennie.

JENNIE
I'm not so sure. You know how you
feel sad about things sometimes --
things that haven't even happened.
Perhaps they're things that are going
to happen. Perhaps we know it, and
are just afraid to admit it to
ourselves.

A pause. Adams is so busy painting he doesn't answer. Suddenly
Jennie's eyes start to close. We see she is sleepy.

JENNIE
(drowsily)
I guess that's silly. I guess I have
a funny mind.

No answer. Adams paints on. Jennie's eyes close again. Her
head droops. She is asleep. After a moment Adams steps back
and looks at the painting.

ADAMS
(excited)
I think I've got it, Jennie. It's
finished.

No answer.

180. CLOSEUP - ADAMS

He looks over at her.

181. CLOSEUP - JENNIE

She is silent and still.

182. ANOTHER ANGLE

Suddenly a fear runs through him. Perhaps Jennie is dead! He
rushes to her and shakes her.

ADAMS
Jennie!... Jennie!...

Slowly her eyes open and look at him.

JENNIE
(drowsily)
Hello, Eben --

ADAMS
(with a sigh of relief)
Oh!... Hello, my darling.

JENNIE
Where are we now?

ADAMS
Together. Poor darling. You're worn
out. I'm sorry.

JENNIE
I --
(she looks around,
realizes where she
is)
Oh -- I fell asleep.

ADAMS
It's finished, Jennie.

Pause. Slowly, Jennie looks at him with a feeling almost of
reverence. Then she rises. Together they go and stand in
front of the painting. A moment's pause. Then --

JENNIE
Is it really of me, Eben?

ADAMS
It's you, Jennie. Portrait of Jennie.

JENNIE
I think it's a fine painting.

ADAMS
(smiling)
Do you?

JENNIE
(nodding gravely)
I think it will make you famous. I
think someday it will hang in a museum
and people will come from all over
the world to see it.

ADAMS
And if they do, it won't be my work
they'd come to see.
(kisses her)
It will be you.

JENNIE
(simply)
Thank you, Eben. And now, you must
sign it --

She takes up his brush and hands it to him. He takes the
brush and signs the picture.

JENNIE
(softly)
Portrait of Jennie -- by Eben Adams.

182A. ANOTHER ANGLE

RETAKE Adams finishes signing. They look at each other. Jennie
goes into Adams' arms.

JENNIE
Oh, Eben -- I want so desperately
just to sit and watch you paint.

ADAMS
(gaily)
Now that I've found the perfect model,
I want to paint her again and again --

JENNIE
(interrupting,
seriously)
No, no -- I don't mean that. I mean
I want you to paint all the beautiful
things in the world...
(she is suddenly a
little sad)
Although some of them...

ADAMS
(who has been playing
with her hair and
has not noticed her
change of mood)
You're the most beautiful thing in
the world.

She throws him a little smile of acknowledgment, but we see
that she is still sad and thoughtful.

JENNIE
Eben, you know those pictures of
yours -- of the sea and the
lighthouse?...

Adams nods.

JENNIE
(continuing)
Each time I think of them my -- my
heart seems to stop.
(almost a slight
shudder)

She puts her hand in Adams'; it is trembling a little. Adams
pats it, looks at her sympathetically.

ADAMS
Land's End Light? Yes, I suppose it
is a forlorn sort of place.

She has been very thoughtful during this.

JENNIE
(she smiles a little,
uncertainly)
Don't let's talk about it any more.
(she walks away from
him)
Tell me about --
(she stops in front
of a canvas -- a
landscape of Paris)
-- about Paris. Did you study there?

ADAMS
Yes, indeed!

JENNIE
Oh, I wish that someday we could see
it together. It would be such fun!

She sits and looks out the window. Adams crosses to her,
eagerly.

ADAMS
We'll do it, Jennie! I'll take you
to the Luxembourg, and to the fair
at Neuilly...

JENNIE
(eagerly)
Oh, yes, Eben, yes!

ADAMS
We'll go out to the Forest of St.
Cloud in the spring, and drink new
wine under the trees.

JENNIE
Oh, Eben -- I feel as though we were
already there... as though we'd been
spending our whole lives together...

Adams takes her in his arms and kisses her.

ADAMS
Jennie, what is it that makes a man
and a woman know that of all the
other men and women in the world,
they belong to each other?

Jennie looks up at him adoringly, touches his lips with her
fingers. He kisses them, continues speaking, while Jennie
thoughtfully absorbs his words and considers them.

ADAMS
And is it just chance -- their being
alive in the world at the same
time?... Were there others, in other
times of the world, whom we would
have loved and who would have loved
us?

JENNIE
(shaking her head)
No... no others... Among all the
people who have lived from world's
end to world's end, there's just one
you must love -- one you must seek
until you find him. You, Eben --
you, my darling.

She cups his face in her hands.

JENNIE
I know now what I've been searching
for... I know now why I was hurrying --
hurrying to grow up.

She presses her lips to his. He puts his arms around her and
holds her close. Suddenly there is a gust of wind, not too
great, behind them. The papers blow. Jennie rises.

JENNIE
(sadly)
Oh, Eben, I must go.

ADAMS
(rising)
Please don't, Jennie...

JENNIE
I don't want to, but -- it won't be
for long. And then --

ADAMS
And then?

JENNIE
(thoughtfully)
Then it will be -- for always.

ADAMS
(taking her hand)
Oh, Jennie, are you sure?

JENNIE
(slowly, with a strange
calm, and yet
wistfully)
Yes, somehow I'm sure. I don't know
quite when it will be -- or where --
but I'm sure it will be for always.

Adams has been looking at her hungrily, but with fear and
doubt. There is another gust of wind, this time much stronger
than the first. Jennie releases herself gently, speaks
casually.

JENNIE
I'll get my things, Eben.

She walks to the bedroom. Adams turns, closes the window,
looks out moodily as Jennie exits. The CAMERA MOVES UP TO A
WAIST FIGURE OF ADAMS.

JENNIE'S VOICE
Oh, Eben. What a lovely scarf!

183A. INT. BEDROOM - JENNIE

RETAKE Jennie is slipping into her coat. She has the scarf
in one hand. We see clearly the door leading to the hall in
the b.g.

ADAMS' VOICE
It's yours, Jennie.

JENNIE
(delighted)
A present? For me?

But her excitement has faded somewhat, and as the CAMERA
MOVES UP ON HER we see a curious and rather half-frightened
sense of recognition.

183B. INSERT - SCARF IN HER HAND

RETAKE It is the same scarf that we have seen in the earlier
sequences.

CAMERA PULLS BACK as Jennie, scarf in hand, walks a few steps
and looks at Adams. There is an expression of infinite
tenderness and love on her face.

183C. LONG SHOT - ADAMS

RETAKE He is staring moodily out the window; he does not see
Jennie looking at him.

ADAMS
I'm glad you like the scarf, Jennie.
I've been saving it for you.

He turns, walks toward CAMERA (and Jennie) INTO WAIST FIGURE,
stops short as he looks. His face falls as he peers around
the room, realizes she is gone.

183D. INT. BEDROOM

RETAKE It is empty. The door to the hall is open.

183E. CONTINUATION OF PREVIOUS ANGLE

RETAKE Adams starts forward, realizes the futility, lowers
his head, advances slowly back towards the window, stops. As
he does, the rain starts to come down, and on the tableau of
Adams standing with his back to us, the rain behind him over
the darkening sky, we

DISSOLVE TO:

184. THE PARK

(already shot)

It is Fall. The leaves have turned and there is the sombre
sadness of autumn in the air.

DISSOLVE TO:

185. GUS' LIVING ROOM IN A SMALL COLDWATER FLAT - FALL

(already shot)

A typically masculine room, sparsely but neatly furnished,
comfortable and homey. A Franklin stove, set in the fireplace,
burning coal, gives out a soft glow.

Adams stands staring out of the window moodily. Everything
is quiet for a moment. Then Gus comes in, from an adjoining
room, presumably the kitchen, carrying two cups of coffee.
He sets one down and then walks over and sets the other one
beside Adams.

GUS
Here y'are, Mack. Just as ordered.

Adams looks around, absently. He smiles.

ADAMS
Oh -- thanks, Gus --

He turns back to look out of the window. Gus gives him a
quick look and then, in silence, walks back and sits and
takes up his coffee. A moment's pause. He sips.

GUS
Beautiful coffee.
(he sighs)
Y'know, Mack, bein' the beautiful
coffee maker that I am, has saved me
a lot of misery. Everytime a girl
gets to pluckin' on my heart strings
a little too loud -- I come home and
make a cup of coffee -- and as I sip
it I sez to myself, "Timothy Augustin,
me bould bucko, what are you thinkin'
of? When you can make coffee the way
you do, what would you be needin'
with a wife?"
(he looks over. There's
no reaction. He
decides to make
another attempt)
Yes, Mack -- many's the time this
coffee has saved me, an' right --

ADAMS
(interrupting)
It's no use, Gus! Something must
have happened to her. Why isn't she
back? Why hasn't she even written to
me? You know, it's been over three
months now?

GUS
It's an Irishman's privilege to answer
your questions with one of me own.

ADAMS
(quieted by Gus's
lightness)
What is it?

GUS
Supposin' now... remember, I'm only
supposin'...
(he dwindles to a
pause)

ADAMS
You're supposing what?

GUS
What I mean is... if she didn't come
back...

ADAMS
(interrupting hotly)
She's got to. She's...

GUS
(butting in before
Adams gets started)
I'm only supposin'... but if something
happened to her... Don't you have to
go on livin'?

Adams stares at Gus refusing to accept the thought. Another
idea strikes him and a slow smile breaks on his face.

ADAMS
I see what you're getting at. You
don't really believe Jennie exists,
do you, Gus?

GUS
(forcing his sincerity)
Don't be puttin' words in me mouth...
all I sez was...

ADAMS
(interrupting)
I know Jennie exists... I know she's
somewhere in New England...
(becoming suddenly
intense)
And I've got to find her, Gus. I've
got to!

They look into each other's eyes. Adams turns abruptly and
strides to the window. Gus hums a few bars of his song. Then:

GUS
Weren't you tellin' me she went to a
convent?

ADAMS
She's not there.

GUS
The Sisters are great people for
keepin' in touch.

ADAMS
(an idea is hatching)
She was very fond of some of the
Sisters.

GUS
Sure -- anyway, you'd be doin'
something -- not just sittin' around.

ADAMS
(suddenly excited)
Okay, Gus -- it's a chance! Will you
drive me out? I can pay you for it
later.

GUS
(hurt)
It's a great pity you know nothin'
about friendship...
(quietly)
Your money don't signify, Mack.
(rising)
Come on!

The thought of action transforms Adams. He smiles.

ADAMS
Gus, don't you wish you were as tough
as you pretend to be?

GUS
(beaming at the change)
Keep that grin on your face an' I'm
paid for the ride.

They start to make preparations for leaving, as we

DISSOLVE TO:

186. LONG SHOT - EXT. ST. MARY'S CONVENT - DAY - FALL

It is the same scene that we have seen before, when Adams
went to see Jennie at the graduation exercises, and, as
before, we see a large group of young girls, dressed in
convent dresses, and a nun getting them into line.

187. MED. SHOT - ADAMS

He has entered and stands, as before, watching the scene. It
is as though it were happening for the first time. A slight
puzzled frown comes to his face.

188. MED. LONG SHOT

Of the girls approaching, with Adams in the foreground.

189. CLOSE SHOT OF GIRLS

passing by, while Adams stands at the side of the path,
searching their faces. He knows Jennie is not among them.
And yet --

DISSOLVE TO:

190. FULL SHOT - INT. CONVENT OUTER OFFICE - DAY

A small, oblong, whitewashed room used as the outer office
of the Mother Superior. It is furnished with a couple of
dark, wooden benches, a desk and chair.

At one end of the room Adams, his hands folded behind his
back, is looking out of a narrow, recessed window into the
sunny countryside.

At the other end of the room, a door opens and a young Sister
enters.

SISTER
Our Mother Superior will see you
now.

ADAMS
Thank you.

PAN WITH ADAMS as he crosses and exits through the door held
open by the young SISTER.

191. FULL SHOT - EXT. CONVENT FLOWER GARDEN

The Mother Superior is watering the flowers. Adams enters
and goes up to her. She looks up.

MOTHER SUPERIOR
Good afternoon. Mr. Adams?

ADAMS
Yes --

MOTHER SUPERIOR
Be with you in one minute, Mr. Adams.
(pouring the water on
the flowers)
Flowers are pretty well gone this
time of year -- but I'm giving them
a last chance. There!
(she pours the last
of the water from
the can on to the
flowers, sets the
can down, and looks
up)
That ends it.
(she smiles)
Will you come with me?

ADAMS
Thank you.

They have a short walk toward the entrance. They go in.

192. INT. MOTHER SUPERIOR'S OFFICE

MOTHER SUPERIOR
(sitting)
Won't you sit down?

ADAMS
(sitting)
Thank you.

MOTHER SUPERIOR
(quizzically)
Now?

ADAMS
(uneasily)
Well -- I wanted to ask you about a
girl that graduated from here. I
thought you might possibly have some
information as to where she is.

MOTHER SUPERIOR
I might. We keep in touch with quite
a few of the girls after they leave.
What was her name?

ADAMS
(almost afraid to
speak)
Jennie Appleton.

The Mother Superior starts slightly and looks at Adams
closely.

MOTHER SUPERIOR
(softly)
Jennie Appleton.

ADAMS
Yes. You remember her, don't you?

MOTHER SUPERIOR
Yes. Yes, I remember Jennie very
well.
(again she looks at
him closely)
Even though she wasn't of our faith,
Jennie was one of my favorite pupils.
A lovely girl with a strange,
spiritual beauty and a kind of gentle
sadness that always troubled me.

ADAMS
(smiling)
That describes her perfectly, I think.
Have you any idea where she is?

A pause. The Mother Superior looks up at him, surprised and
a trifle bewildered.

MOTHER SUPERIOR
Why -- Jennie died -- many years
ago.

Another slight pause. For a second a horrified look goes
over Adams' face. The Mother Superior sees it and adds
quickly, gently.

MOTHER SUPERIOR
Oh, I -- I'm afraid I've shocked
you.

Adams dismisses the thought and recovers.

ADAMS
Well, no... we're obviously not
speaking of the same person. You
see, the Jennie Appleton I mean only
left here a few months ago. I haven't
heard from her -- and I'm very anxious
to find out just where she is. I
thought she might have written you.

MOTHER SUPERIOR
There has only been one Jennie
Appleton ever here -- in my time --
Mr. Adams.

Another pause. Adams looks at her, bewildered.

ADAMS
But -- that's impossible. I beg your
pardon -- but I saw Jennie the day
she left.

MOTHER SUPERIOR
Oh -- did you know her family?

ADAMS
No. I just know that they were killed
in an accident.

MOTHER SUPERIOR
A wire broke? They were trapeze
performers?

Adams gazes at her, now completely bewildered.

ADAMS
(in a whisper)
Yes --

MOTHER SUPERIOR
(gently)
I'm afraid it must be the same Jennie
Appleton.

A long pause. Adams looks at her, stunned.

ADAMS
I -- I don't understand.

MOTHER SUPERIOR
Would you care to have me tell you
more about Jennie?

ADAMS
(in a low voice)
Yes -- please --

MOTHER SUPERIOR
(after a pause, gently)
She was brought here by her aunt
shortly after her parents' death.
She was young, sensitive -- she loved
life. We became great friends.
(she pauses)
I wasn't Mother Superior then so I
had more time to spend with our young
girls than I do now. Jennie stayed
with us until she graduated -- and
then her aunt took her up to New
England for the summer. We
corresponded a great deal.
(she pauses and leans
forward)
Would you like to have me read one
of her letters to you?

ADAMS
Please.

The Mother Superior gets up out of her chair.

MOTHER SUPERIOR
I was so touched by her letters that
I saved them.

193. MEDIUM SHOT

Of the Mother Superior. PAN WITH HER to a large file. She
opens a drawer, searches a moment, then extracts a bundle of
letters held together with a silk ribbon. She handles them
carefully, the way one handles a cherished possession. She
slips the letter on top out of the bundle and opens it.

MOTHER SUPERIOR
This is the last one she wrote me.

DOLLY IN on her.

MOTHER SUPERIOR
(continuing -- as she
reads)
"My dear Sister Mary of Mercy: We
are returning very soon. The summer
has been a very long and lonely one.
How I want to see you again and sit
and talk to you about all that has
been worrying me!"

ADAMS' VOICE
What was she worried about?

MOTHER SUPERIOR
(looking up)
What every young girl worries about --
the fulfillment of her life --
happiness and -- love.

ADAMS' VOICE
(softly)
And she never found them?

MOTHER SUPERIOR
No. You see, she was so young when...
(then gently)
She didn't have time.
(she turns back to
the letter and reads)
"I know you tried to teach me how
beautiful the world is and how it
keeps on being beautiful every day...
no matter what happens to us... But
sometimes I have the dreadful feeling
that this beauty will never be
complete for me... that I will never
find some one to love... who will
love me. It's a thought that terrifies
me, dear Sister, and I need your
comfort and your wisdom to help me.
Your loving Jennie."

Slowly the Mother Superior folds the letter and looks at
Adams.

194. MED. TWO SHOT

of the Mother Superior and Adams who sits in his chair, his
anxious face turned toward her.

ADAMS
Did Jennie... come back?

195. PAN WITH MOTHER SUPERIOR

as she crosses to Adams.

MOTHER SUPERIOR
No -- she didn't.
(very simply)
That was the year when the terrible
tidal wave hit the New England coast --
October fifth. I remember it well. I
always receive communion for Jennie
on that day.
(a pause)
I learned -- later -- that Jennie
was in the habit of sailing out every
day -- alone -- to a little cove
near an abandoned lighthouse -- and
during one of these trips the wave
struck -- and that was the last any
one ever saw of her.

Suddenly Adams is on his feet. He is excited and desperate.
We feel that he already knows the answer to the question he
is about to ask.

ADAMS
This cove -- this abandoned lighthouse --
where is it?

MOTHER SUPERIOR
On Cape Cod -- near Sagamore.

ADAMS
"Land's End Light!"

MOTHER SUPERIOR
Yes, that was the name.

ADAMS
(with mounting
excitement)
"Land's End Light"! That's where
I'll find her!

MOTHER SUPERIOR
Jennie is dead, Mr. Adams. You must
accept that fact -- hard as it may
be to --

ADAMS
(interrupting --
desperately and wildly)
I won't accept it! Don't tell me
she's dead! She was in my arms three
months ago -- not ten years ago! I
love her and want her!

MOTHER SUPERIOR
(trying to calm him)
Don't doubt the ways of providence,
Mr. Adams. What vision has been
vouchsafed you, I can't say. But be
sure it is for a reason beyond ours
to know. You must have faith that
there is a greater design -- a greater
plan to the universe than we are
able to comprehend. We know so little --
so very little. Be calm, Mr. Adams.

ADAMS
Calm!

MOTHER SUPERIOR
Remember there are more things in
heaven and earth than are dreamt of
in our philosophy.

ADAMS
(impatiently)
I don't want to seem abrupt -- and
I'm grateful for your kindness --
but -- when did you say the wave
struck the coast? October fifth?

MOTHER SUPERIOR
That's right. October fifth.

ADAMS
(as though to himself,
thinking)
And today is October first --

MOTHER SUPERIOR
Yes --

ADAMS
That leaves me four days --

MOTHER SUPERIOR
(desperately)
But Mr. Adams. That October fifth
was many years ago.

Adams stops and turns to her. He seems suddenly calmer.

ADAMS
Are you so sure? You say we know so
little -- Then how can you say it
happened many years ago? You say
that Jennie's parents were killed. I
found her sobbing on a bench the
night it happened... You say she was
a student here. I visited her here...
You say she went to New England with
her aunt. I was with her just before
she left... Yes -- we know so little --
and yet now I know a little more. I
know now the pattern of Jennie's
life. But I also know I am part of
it. She herself said that the strands
of our lives were woven together --
and that neither time nor the world
could break them. This I have faith
in. Thank you, Mother. I must hurry.
Thank you for your kindness.

He turns abruptly and hurries out. Through the above speech
the Mother Superior has been looking at him with bewilderment,
as though at a revelation. As he leaves, she continues to
look after him, then moves over to the wall where, in a niche,
is the figure of Saint Mary. The Mother Superior crosses
herself and bows her head in prayer. (Get technical advice
on this last).

DISSOLVE TO:

196. FULL SHOT - INT. MATHEWS' GALLERY - DAY - FALL

Adams, carrying Jennie's portrait wrapped in brown paper,
comes hurrying into the gallery. He is wild-eyed and excited.
Miss Spinney comes up to him. (The whole mood and tempo of
the picture accelerates from this point on.)

SPINNEY
Adams, where have you been keeping
yourself --
(she breaks off and
looks at him closely,
seeing the state he
is in)
What's wrong, Adams?

ADAMS
(in short hurried
words)
I'm going away. I don't know how
long I'll be gone. Here's my portrait
of Jennie. Will you store it for me
until I come back?

SPINNEY
(quietly, taking the
portrait)
Where are you going?

ADAMS
Up on the Cape -- a place called
Land's End -- and I have to be there
before October fifth. That gives me
three days.

SPINNEY
Three days for what?

ADAMS
(excited)
I've found her, Spinney. I know where
she's going to be, and don't you
understand, I've got to be there
waiting for her.

SPINNEY
You're sure? Are you sure about all
this?

ADAMS
Of course I'm sure.

Mathews enters from the other room.

MATTHEWS
Well, Adams, where have you been?
I've a lot of commissions for you.

ADAMS
In that case, perhaps you wouldn't
mind advancing me a hundred dollars.

MATTHEWS
(looking at Spinney
somewhat fearfully)
Well... uh.

SPINNEY
Yes -- of course you can have your
hundred dollars.

She turns to the cash drawer.

MATTHEWS
What's the matter, Adams, is something
wrong?

SPINNEY
Never mind that, Mr. Mathews, it's
nothing you need concern yourself
with.

MATTHEWS
(defeated again)
As you say, Miss Spinney.

SPINNEY
(handing Adams the
hundred dollars)
You're quite sure you want to make
this trip, Adams?

ADAMS
I've got to make it.
(taking the money)
Thank you, Spinney. Thanks for
everything.

SPINNEY
Paint me a little church while you're
there -- Say, twenty by twenty-four --
a little white one with a big steeple.
And don't drown yourself in the sea.

ADAMS
Why would I do that?

SPINNEY
I don't know. Men are fools enough
to do anything. I don't trust the
sea.
(she smiles)
I wouldn't go within fifty miles of
it.

ADAMS
You're tough. The sea would never
get you.

SPINNEY
(quietly)
It's the tough ones drown easy.

She turns quickly away and out of the room. Adams starts to
the door, Mathews with him.

MATTHEWS
Goodbye, my boy. Get a good rest.
We'll do big things together later.

ADAMS
Yes -- yes -- goodbye --

He hurries out, as we --

DISSOLVE TO:

197. INT. TRAIN - PROCESS - NIGHT - FALL

Adams is sitting by the window, staring out into the night,
tensely. The train is going at full speed and the monotonous
melody of the wheels is heard, and blended with them, we
hear:

JENNIE'S VOICE
(urgently)
Eben -- Eben -- Eben --

The thundering of the train crossing a bridge drowns out her
voice, as we

DISSOLVE TO:

198. INT. MARINE HARDWARE STORE - NIGHT

OPEN ON A BAROMETER which indicates "Fair" weather. PULL
BACK to reveal the Marine Hardware Store where Adams is
leaning over the counter talking to the old storekeeper. In
the foreground sits another old mariner, puffing at a pipe.
It is suggested that he be in silhouette with rim lighting,
with strong light on the face of the old storekeeper and
Adams, and the middle distance and other parts of the store
in deep shadows, for contrasting lighting effect. Through
the window we see that it is a very foggy night. All that is
visible, perhaps, is the mast of a sailing ship, or two of
them, on one of which lights swing slighty. (There is no
wind.) In the distance we hear the bell on a buoy and a
mournful fog horn.

As we have PULLED BACK, we have seen a large calendar with
the single page revealing the date, October 4th, with the
numeral very large.

We hear the dialogue after we've held the barometer for a
few feet and directly we start to PULL BACK.

Adams' dialogue has a note of urgency in it by contrast to
the New Englanders who aren't going to be shaken out of their
customs and tempo and who are both old men.

ADAMS
Hasn't there been any warning of the
storm yet?

STOREKEEPER
Wut storm's thet?

ADAMS
The hurricane that's coming up.

STOREKEEPER
(with a little chuckle)
No hurricane comin' up 'round here,
young fella.
(he turns and looks
at the barometer,
indicating it with
his head to Adams)
Fair weather, that's wut it sez --
right theyeh.

ADAMS
How far in advance would that
barometer show -- if one was coming
up?

STOREKEEPER
Fur 'nuff.

OLD MARINER
(moodily and quietly)
Didn' show fur 'nuff wen we hed thet
hurricane back'n the Twenties.
(Adams turns to him)
Come up s'fast hardly knew 'bout it
afore it hit.

199. ANOTHER ANGLE ON ADAMS AND STOREKEEPER

ADAMS
Yes, I've heard of that hurricane.
(he turns back to the
storekeeper)
Just about this time of year, wasn't
it?

STOREKEEPER
Eh?... By golly, come ter think of
't --
(he looks at the
calendar)
it wuz. October Fifth. Remember 'cuz
October Fourth's m'birthday. Terday.
(proudly)
'M seventy-eight.

OLD MARINER
Yer gittin' on, Caleb. Hev to be
thinkin' o' slowin' down a bit in
another couple o' years, mebbe.

STOREKEEPER
(thoughtfully)
Mm... mebbe...

ADAMS
(to the mariner)
You say you didn't have much warning
of that last hurricane?

OLD MARINER
Ay-eh... we hed a warnin' -- but,
Land O' Goshen, nobuddy hed no idearit
wuz gon ter be like it wuz gon ter
be. Yes, siree, houses come sailin'
by here thet'd ben settin' good an'
firm a hunderd years.

STOREKEEPER
'Nuff lives lost ter stock a good-
size cemetary.

ADAMS
I don't suppose either of you heard
anything about a girl named Jennie
Appleton?
(he looks at the
storekeeper)

STOREKEEPER
(thinks a moment,
then shakes his head)
Nope.

Adams turns and looks at the mariner, who's also thinking.

ADAMS
Did you?

OLD MARINER
(hesitates a moment,
then shakes his head)
Nope.

Adams paces a bit as he thinks (but don't let down his tempo
in contrast to theirs).

ADAMS
I'd like to get out to Land's End
Light. Where can I charter a boat?

STOREKEEPER
Land's End Light! Ain't ben no one
there sence they gave up walin' round
these parts - back wen I wuz a young-
un. Cain't think o' any reason 't
all anybuddy'd want ter go out there
now. Kin you, Will?

OLD MARINER
Nope. Nary a reason.

ADAMS
(annoyed)
Never mind my reasons! Can't you
just tell me who's got a boat?

STOREKEEPER
(after a moment)
Wal -- Cal's got a bote.

ADAMS
Where can I find Cal?

STOREKEEPER
(slowly)
N-o-o... Never heard tell o' Cal
rent'n 'is bote.

OLD MARINER
My pa's gut a trim lil' bote.

ADAMS
(advances to him a
few steps)
Fine! Would you mind taking me to
your pa?

OLD MARINER
(puffing)
N-o-o... Come t' think of 't -- don't
think ma'd like 'im ter rent 'is
bote.

STOREKEEPER
(shouting from
background)
Know how ter handle a bote, young
fella?

ADAMS
(whipping around and
going back to him)
Of course I know how to handle a
boat!

STOREKEEPER
Then mebbe y'ought ter see Eke. I've
heard tell how he rents his bote --
sometimes --
(he looks Adams over
carefully)
ter some people.

ADAMS
(almost at wit's end
by now)
Then can you tell me where I'll find
Eke?

STOREKEEPER
Oh, tain't hard ter find Eke. He's
allus settin' 'n the same place.

ADAMS
Where's that?

STOREKEEPER
Wal, I'll tell ye now. Ye jest go
down ter th' jetty, an' ye ask
anybuddy there fur --

ADAMS
(impatiently breaking
in over last word)
I know.
(he's on his way out)
I ask for Eke. Thanks.
(he exits)
The storekeeper watches him go, turns
to the mariner.

STOREKEEPER
Think Eke'll rent 'is bote?

OLD MARINER
Nope...
(he puffs)
Wal-l-l, come t' think of 't...
mebbe...

ALTERNATE ENDING:

199A. CLOSE SHOT - STOREKEEPER

STOREKEEPER
(thinking about it)
Hmmmm...

He's ready to go home now, reaches for his mariner's hat,
puts it on his head. Pinned on it is a very old and weather-
beaten election button, but which is not too old to clearly
read the legend: "McKINLEY FOR PRESIDENT." The storekeeper
lifts the shelf or otherwise moves to exit.

DISSOLVE TO:

200. EXT. JETTY - NIGHT - FOG

Silhouettes of masts, with lights on them. SOUNDS of gentle,
lapping water, fog horn, bell buoys. Otherwise everything
very calm. Adams is talking to the seaman, Eke, who is busying
himself with his cat-boat. In the course of the scene, he
strolls away, sits on a barrel, Adams walking with him and
then standing next to him.

ADAMS
Mighty nice of you to rent me your
boat.

EKE
Could durn near buy a new one fer
wut yer payin' me. But I don't see
how yer figger t' git 'er out
termorrer in all this muck.

ADAMS
(looking around)
You mean the fog? It ought to be
lifting very soon now.

EKE
Not the way I figger it. Ain't no
sign of a wind, neither.

ADAMS
(quiet conviction)
Oh, there'll be wind all right. Plenty
of it.

EKE
Mebbe. Never ben too sure 'bout them
things -- sence thet hurricane back
'n the Twenties. We had a fog
thicker'n soup -- jest like ternight --
warn't 'nuff wind ter blow yer
wiskers... Then, all uv a sudden
jest th' littlist breath o' wind
come sneakin' by -- hot 'n quiet. I
tell yer, the way thet mist moved --
wal, it jest warn't natchul.

ADAMS
What about -- the wave? I heard
something about a great wave.

There's a moment's silence. Then, Eke speaks quietly: From
this point on, his mood is that of a man who talks about
supernatural things, about things he doesn't even like to
remember.

EKE
The wave?... Yep, they wuz a wave.
Sometimes I think I di'n' see it --
thet I jest read 'bout it -- like
sump'n in the Scriptures --

He puts his hand across his eyes with the awful memory of
it.

EKE
(continuing)
It come up out o' the sea like a
mountin -- a mountin movin' towads
the shore. Sixty foot high, it must'
a ben. A sixty-foot wall o' water --
comin', comin', comin', towads the
land like the Judgment Day.

ADAMS
(after a moment,
quietly, not looking
at Eke)
You didn't happen to know -- a girl --
a visitor -- who was caught by the
wave? Her name was Jennie Appleton.

Eke looks sharply and strangely up at him - then, after a
moment, speaks.

EKE
Know 'er!... Queer now, ye should
ask me thet. I shan't never fergit
'er till the day I die... Did ye
know 'er?

ADAMS
(quietly, after a
second, looking away)
Yes... I knew her...

EKE
Purty young thing, warn't she? Sech
big, sad eyes, she hed.
(looks far away with
a sad, wistful smile)
Big, sad eyes, an' a look 'bout 'er
thet come from far away.

ADAMS
What happened exactly? I've -- I've
wondered where she was when -- when
the wave...

EKE
(with an effort pulling
himself out of the
mood of his memory;
with a sigh)
Wal, ye see, it wuz this way. I used
ter rent 'er my bote. She liked ter
sail 'round the point -- down yonder
past the Land's End Light. I used
ter watch 'er leave. They wuz sump'n
'bout thet girl -- sump'n 'bout the
way she stood before the wind...

ADAMS
(quietly, with a
wistful smile)
Yes... I know what you mean.

EKE
Wal, thet day, jest after she pulled
out, Cal Jenkins come a-runnin' with
a warnin' uv the storm. I yelled ter
'er an' waved... Sometimes I think
she di 'n' hear me, but I don't
rightly know how thet could-a ben.
She waved back at me, an' then she
smiled -- like I never seen her smile
before. An' then she flattened thet
mainsail in tight an' sailed right
straight inter thet storm.

ADAMS
There was no trace of her after that,
I suppose.

EKE
She made the shore at Land's End
Light... thet much is sartin... I
found the masthead uv my boat tied
t' the warf -- or wut wuz left uv
it.

Adams takes this, absorbs this final proof that Jennie died
in her first existence. He strolls away a few feet, looks
out into the fog, thinking hard, his back to Eke.

ADAMS
Let me ask you something: The wave
wasn't as high as the lighthouse,
was it?

EKE
(thinking)
No... The lighthouse sets up there
mighty high 'bove them rocks.

ADAMS
(turning, his hopes
growing)
That's what I thought.
(his tempo picks up)
Then if she could have made the
lighthouse, she might have been saved,
isn't that right?

EKE
(looks at him
surprised;
compassionately,
quietly)
But she didn't make it.

ADAMS
(thoughtfully, but
still excited)
I know -- but I wonder why she didn't.

EKE
Wal, it wud've ben a purty tough
climb -- in all thet wind --
'specially fer a female.

ADAMS
(thoughtfully, but
with controlled
excitement, his eyes
far away)
Yes... I suppose it would -- alone...

Eke sighs, looks at him sympathetically.

EKE
Sump'n strange 'bout thet girl...
sump'n strange an' lonesome-like...
I thought 'bout her lots --
(he reaches for a way
of expressing himself)
She wuz diffrent from all the other
young-uns -- she never seemed happy --
until thet moment wen she sailed out
ter meet the storm.

Adams looks at him, takes this, turns a little, and looks up
into the fog. HOLD FOR A DISSOLVE:

ALTERNATELY, MOVE CAMERA OVER TO THE MIST. We hear the buoy
bells and the fog horn...

DISSOLVE TO:

201. OUT

Sequence omitted from original script.

202. A SHOT OF JUST FOG - DAY (SLIFER STRAIGHT SHOT)

CAMERA PULLS DOWN to a wind indicator. There is no wind. It
is very still. The small craft warning flag hangs limp.

202A. LONG SHOT - ADAMS' SAILBOAT (MINIATURE)

It is becalmed.

DISSOLVE TO:

202B. CLOSE SHOT - WIND INDICATOR (SLIFER STRAIGHT SHOT)

The wind picks up and slowly the indicator starts to move.

202C. CLOSEUP - ADAMS IN THE BOAT (PROCESS)

He becomes aware of the wind and of the fog moving, and looks
up.

202D. CLOSE SHOT OF SAIL AND MAST (STRAIGHT SHOT) MOVING FOG

The wind fills the sail.

DISSOLVE TO:

202E. EXTREME LONG SHOT - THE OCEAN (MINIATURE)

The fog lifts, revealing first the lighthouse in the extreme
distance, and then, as it continues to move, Adams' boat
comes into view.

DISSOLVE TO:

202F. LONG SHOT - ADAMS' BOAT (MINIATURE)

We see the cats-paws as the wind increases.

202G. MED. SHOT - ADAMS (PROCESS)

As he gets the boat under way. He looks up.

202H. CLOSE SHOT - SEA GULLS (AGAINST DARK, LEADENED SKIES)
(STOCK SHOT)

Fleeing in advance of the storm (flying right to left).

DISSOLVE TO:

203. CLOSE SHOT - A STORM FLAG BEING RUN UP A POLE (SLIFER
SHOT)

DISSOLVE TO:

203A-203B. A BAROMETER (SLIFER SHOT)

Superimposed over the barometer, is a teletype ticker tape
with news of the storm rising. (WORDS TO BE SUPPLIED BY
RESEARCH DEPT.) As the message is being typed out, the
barometer DISSOLVES OUT, CAMERA PULLS BACK TO INCLUDE:

THE TELETYPE MACHINE - (DAY - LAMPLIGHT) -- over which the
message is being sent, and a man's hands tapping out the
keys. As he finishes the message, another pair of hands bring
in another message which is a warning to beware of lulls in
the storm. The teletype operator holds the message in his
hands so that CAMERA CAN READ it clearly. (WORDS TO BE
SUPPLIED BY RESEARCH DEPT.) The operator puts the paper with
the message down and immediately starts to send the warning
over the teletype.

DISSOLVE TO:

204. LONG SHOT - ROUGH WATERS (MINIATURE)

A huge swell goes down and Adams' boat is revealed fighting
the storm.

204A. MEDIUM SHOT - ADAMS (PROCESS)

Trying to keep the boat on its course.

204B. CLOSE SHOT OF ADAMS (PROCESS)

204C. CLOSE ANGLE - STERN OF BOAT (PROCESS)

204D. CLOSE SHOT - ADAMS (PROCESS)

205. LONG SHOT - ADAMS' BOAT (MINIATURE)

The lighthouse is revealed in the background.

205A. A VIEWPOINT OF THE LIGHTHOUSE FROM ADAMS' ANGLE
(MINIATURE)

CAMERA GUNS UP at the lighthouse.

205B. CLOSEUP OF ADAMS (PROCESS)

Looking up at the lighthouse.

205C. LONG SHOT - ADAMS' BOAT (MINIATURE)

As it goes by rocks.

205D. CLOSE ANGLE - VIEWPOINT OF ROCKS AND WAVES (MINIATURE)

This should be a threatening shot with CAMERA MOVING IN.

205E. ANOTHER ANGLE OF ADAMS' BOAT (MINIATURE)

Moving through the rocks toward the lighthouse.

205F. CLOSE SHOT - ADAMS (PROCESS)

205G. MED. SHOT - ADAMS (PROCESS)

205H. CLOSEUP HULL OF BOAT (STRAIGHT SHOT ON STAGE)

Scraping the rocks.

205I. CLOSEUP OF ADAMS (PROCESS)

205J. MED. SHOT - HULL OF BOAT (PROCESS)

Crashing against the rocks.

206. MED. LONG SHOT - ADAMS' BOAT (MINIATURE)

As it crashes on the rocks and capsizes, breaking the mast
and tearing the sail. (We do not see Adams' body being
thrown.)

DISSOLVE TO:

207. OUT

Sequence omitted from original script.

208A. BAROMETER (SLIFER SHOT)

Superimposed over this, we again see a ticker tape with the
warning about a hurricane (WORDS TO BE SUPPLIED BY RESEARCH
DEPT.). CAMERA ZOOMS DOWN to the word "hurricane."

DISSOLVE TO:

208B. TWO FLAGS - FOR THE HURRICANE WARNING (SLIFER SHOT)

Being run up a pole.

DISSOLVE TO:

208C. CLOSE SHOT - WEATHER MAP (SLIFER SHOT)

CAMERA PICKS UP the words, "U.S. WEATHER BUREAU" printed at
the top of the map and MOVES DOWN across the map to a pencil
which is just finishing the core formation of a hurricane.

DISSOLVE TO:

208D. TRICK SHOT - HURRICANE CORE (SLIFER SHOT)

A couple of miles above the ocean. CAMERA SLOWLY WANDERS
along the threatening clouds until it comes to a break in
the clouds. Then, far below, we can see the peninsula with
the lighthouse. CAMERA STARTS TO MOVE DOWN toward the
peninsula.

DISSOLVE TO:

208E. A HIGH LONG SHOT OF LIGHTHOUSE AND SECTION OF PENINSULA
(MINIATURE)

CAMERA CONTINUES TO MOVE DOWN toward the lighthouse.

DISSOLVE TO:

208F. MED. SHOT - BEACH AND ROCKS (MINIATURE)

CAMERA CONTINUES TO MOVE closer until we PICK UP the body of
Adams lying in the small stretch of sand among the rocks.

DISSOLVE TO:

210. CLOSE SHOT OF ADAMS - (NIGHT)

He comes to, looks around slowly, trying to orient himself.
The hurricane is lashing the peninsula and lighthouse with
full force. Adams rolls over groggily, crawls across a small
stretch of sand, toward the protection of a huge rock.

211-212. OUT

Sequence omitted from original script.

213. WAIST-FIGURE SHOT OF ADAMS

(already shot)

He rises into the SHOT, stands against the rock, a little
groggy. He pulls himself together, looks TOWARD CAMERA, and
from right to left, then back again, peering to see if he
can find Jennie.

213A. VIEWPOINT SHOT OF ROCKS AND WAVES - A SLOW, PANNING
SHOT TO MATCH ADAMS' LOOK IN SPEED AND DIRECTION

(already shot)

NOTE: This is not to be the spot where Jennie later appears.

213B. BACK TO WAIST-FIGURE SHOT OF ADAMS

(already shot)

His eyes searching. He calls:

ADAMS
Jennie!...

213C. VIEWPOINT SHOT OF ROCKS AND WAVES - STATIONARY SHOT

(already shot) (Not where Jennie appears later)

Nothing but the waves answer him.

213D. BACK TO WAIST-FIGURE SHOT OF ADAMS

(already shot)

His eyes continuing to peer into the darkness. He becomes
aware of a banging SOUND coming from the lighthouse behind
him, and he turns away from CAMERA toward it.

213E. LONG SHOT OF THE LIGHTHOUSE - (ADAMS' VIEWPOINT)

(already shot)

We see the doors banging in the wind.

213F. CLOSEUP OF ADAMS (See present film for duplicating the
angle)

(already shot)

His hopes rise and he calls:

ADAMS
Jennie!...

214. ANGLE SHOOTING THROUGH LIGHTHOUSE DOOR TOWARD THE BEACH

(already shot)

Adams can be seen in the background and we hear his call
from the distance:

ADAMS
Jennie!...

215. BACK TO CLOSEUP OF ADAMS

(already shot)

He listens for a moment, is disappointed that there's no
answer, but decides to go up to the lighthouse to investigate,
and starts out, CAMERA PANNING HIM TO OPEN SPACE away from
rock in order to match the next cut.

216-238. OUT

Sequence omitted from original script.

Adams starts across the open space. A huge wave engulfs him
and he is thrown down with it. He pulls himself up again and
struggles up the rocks to the lighthouse. He jumps over the
chasm between the rocks and the lighthouse, climbs the ladder
and enters.

239. EXT. LIGHTHOUSE

(already shot)

Adams descends the ladder and comes out on the rocks.

240-241. WAIST FIGURE SHOT OF ADAMS ON ROCKS

(already shot)

He looks out towards the peninsula and calls.

ADAMS
Jennie!

242. VIEWPOINT SHOT OF WATER AND ROCKS (MINIATURE)

(already shot)

JENNIE'S VOICE
(Sonovox effect)
Eben... Eben...

242A. CLOSE SHOT - ADAMS

(already shot)

He reacts and exits.

242A1. HIGH OVERHEAD SHOT - LIGHTHOUSE IN F.G. - PENINSULA
IN B.G.

TO BE SHOT

Adams scrambles down the rocks, starts running in the
direction of the peninsula.

JENNIE'S VOICE
(Sonovox effect)
Eben... Eben...

242A2. LONG SHOT

(already shot)

As Adams runs, a huge wave washes in behind him, just missing
him. Adams continues running, then stops in MED. CLOSE SHOT
and looks.

242B-242C. OUT

Sequence omitted from original script.

242D. VIEWPOINT SHOT - SHOOTING DOWN PENINSULA (SKETCH #2)

RETAKE

We hear Jennie's voice.

JENNIE'S VOICE
(Sonovox effect)
Eben... Eben...

243. CLOSE SHOT OF ADAMS (SKETCH #3)

RETAKE

CAMERA MOVES IN ON HIM as his face lights up.

244. VIEWPOINT SHOT - SHOOTING DOWN PENINSULA (SKETCH #4)

RETAKE

In the extreme distance Jennie appears. In this SHOT the sky
seems to take on an eerie mood. Also the appearance of Jennie
has a strange eerie quality. (Hilation effect to be used on
her clothes, as discussed in conference. Also for protection,
do alternates without this effect.) Jennie runs toward CAMERA.

245. HIGH OVERHEAD MATTE SHOT (SKETCH #5)

RETAKE

The two tiny figures of Adams and Jennie run toward each
other.

246. LONG SHOT - JENNIE (SKETCH #6)

RETAKE

As Jennie runs down the peninsula toward CAMERA, CAMERA MOVES
IN to meet her until she arrives in a CLOSE SHOT. She is
breathless from the exertion of the run down the peninsula,
but her face is radiant. She is triumphant in her struggle
to reach him.

246A. LONG SHOT - ADAMS (SKETCH #7)

RETAKE

As Adams runs up the peninsula toward Jennie, CAMERA MOVES
IN to meet him until he, too, arrives in a CLOSE SHOT. His
expression is a mixture of excitement, joy, and frantic fear.

247. CLOSE TWO SHOT AND OVER SHOULDER SHOTS

RETAKE

NOTE: Consider whether we should make an angle of Scene 247
for matting, so that we can see the sea beyond them rise as
the storm rises, rather than having to intercut.

He takes Jennie into his arms. They kiss frantically.

NOTE: Adams has been fighting the elements for hours, running
up and down the lighthouse, back across the rocks and
peninsula. He must be breathless and speak with some
exhaustion. Similarly, Jennie has been running down the
peninsula and has fought "to get back," and in her, too,
there should be a breathlessness and physical fatigue, mixed
in with her exultation.

ADAMS
Oh, Jennie, Jennie! I was afraid I
wouldn't find you!

JENNIE
It's been such a long time... Let me
look at you, dearest.
(she looks, studies
his face)

ADAMS
(kissing her again)
I'll never let you go again. Never!

There is a sudden single gust of WIND, and suddenly Adams
remembers.

ADAMS
(with some urgency)
Jennie, darling! The wave -- it's
coming again --

JENNIE
(still studying him)
It's still all right, whatever
happens. That's what I had to get
back to tell you.

ADAMS
(shouting almost
angrily)
'Whatever happens?' It's you I want,
Jennie! Not just dreams of you!

JENNIE
(going into his arms,
throwing her arms
around his neck)
Hold me close, Eben!

ADAMS
(grabbing her and
holding her away
from him forcefully)
Jennie -- I beg you to believe me!
The wave will strike again -- and
soon!
(indicating wildly)
The lighthouse -- the lighthouse is
the only safe place. We've a whole
lifetime together if we make it...

JENNIE
We have all eternity together, Eben...
Can't you see? We were lonely --
unloved. We were meant for each other.
Time made an error, but you waited
for me, and so we found our love.

ADAMS
(bitterly)
And having found it, must we lose it
again?

JENNIE
No, no, Eben. We're just beginning!
There is no life, my darling, until
you've loved and been loved -- and
then there is no death.

ADAMS
(decisively)
Maybe what you say is true, Jennie!
But I'll not be separated from you
again in this life!

JENNIE
Oh, Eben. You have so much beauty
still to give the world.

ADAMS
Not without you, Jennie!

JENNIE
You'll never again be without me,
Eben --

248. SHOT OF THE SEA

TO BE SHOT

Showing the rising storm.

NOTE: Shoot this starting with a placid sea, so that we can
use two or three intercuts with Scene 247.

249. BACK TO ADAMS AND JENNIE

RETAKE

They turn, Adams leading her.

249A. EXTREMELY HIGH ANGLE MATTE SHOT - SHOOTING DOWN THE
PENINSULA

TO BE SHOT

In which we orient ourselves from the viewpoint of the rocks
they eventually reach. We see the sea rising. (In this angle,
Jennie and Adams come to the set that matches what is on the
film.)

NOTE: This could be shot with doubles

249B. ANOTHER SHOT OF THE RISING STORM

TO BE SHOT

249C. LONG SHOT (NOW ON FILM)

(already shot)

A huge wave washes over the rock in their path and stops
them.

ADAMS
(WILD LINE)
We've got to go the other way round --
up over the rocks!

250. LONG SHOT

(already shot)

They start up over the higher rocks. Another large wave washes
over the rocks.

250A. MED. SHOT

(already shot)

As they struggle across the rocks. Again a large wave washes
over them.

251. EXTREME LONG SHOT

(already shot)

As they make their way over the rocks. A huge wave comes in.

251A. LONG SHOT

(already shot)

As the wave engulfs them and hurls them from the rocks.

252. CLOSE SHOT OF LARGE ROCK WITH WATER POURING OVER IT

(already shot)

CAMERA PANS DOWN FROM THE ROCK to Adams lying prone, holding
Jennie by the hand. He pulls her up, rising to his feet.

253-255. OUT

Sequence omitted from original script.

256. MED. LONG SHOT - SHOOTING UP OVER JENNIE'S BACK

(already shot)

Adams pulls her up to the top of the rock.

JENNIE
Please, Eben, I --

256A. EYEMO SHOT - SHOOTING UP AT JENNIE AND ADAMS

(already shot)

Adams is urging her forward.

JENNIE
(continuing)
I can't go on.

ADAMS
You must, Jennie -- you must -- it's
not much further.

257. SHOT OF THE SEA

TO BE SHOT

Across the distant horizon we see a great wave rising.

257A. MED. SHOT - LOW CAMERA ANGLE - SHOOTING UP ON CLIFF

RETAKE

Jennie, in f.g., is leaning exhaustedly against the rock.
Adams (double) is just in the process of completing hoisting
himself up a stiff rock like a mountain climber. There is a
great deal of spray, and the photography generally matches
the EYEMO SHOT.

257B. CLOSER ANGLE

RETAKE

We see that he is in a safe and protected point. Rapidly he
braces himself and sinks to his knees as he goes to reach
down to Jennie.

258. ANGLE SHOOTING DOWN PAST ADAMS AT JENNIE

RETAKE

In the b.g. and below (matte shot) we see far beneath the
rocks and the turbulent sea.

ADAMS
Jennie! Quick! Take my hand.

Jennie feebly grasps Adams' hand.

259. ANOTHER ANGLE OF THE WAVE COMING

TO BE SHOT

The strange "sucking" noise accompanying it grows louder.

260. CLOSEUP - ADAMS

RETAKE

As he is attracted by the SOUND and turns frantically. He is
horrified by what he sees and turns back fast to Jennie.

ADAMS
(screaming)
Here it comes, darling! We've got to
make it!

261-263. CLOSE ANGLE - SHOOTING DOWN ON JENNIE: REVERSE ANGLE
SHOOTING UP ON ADAMS: BIG CLOSEUP - ADAMS, CUTTING OFF TOP
AND BOTTOM OF HIS HEAD: MATCHING BIG CLOSEUP OF JENNIE: ALSO
MASTER SHOT

RETAKE

Jennie is exhausted and barely able to return Adams' desperate
grasp of her hand.

ADAMS
(grits his teeth;
with wild desperation,
his voice heard above
the on-coming noise
of the wave)
Jennie!

JENNIE
(she is fading fast,
but she manages with
tremendous effort to
smile and get out
her last words)
Goodbye, my darling -- for a little
while.

The edge of the wave hits Jennie.

264-269. INTERCUTS FOR THE ABOVE

RETAKES & ADDED

(a) LONG SHOTS and EXTREME LONG SHOTS of the wave hitting,
as previously planned.

(b) PROFILE SHOT OF THEIR HANDS clasped, as Adams attempts
to pull her up. This should be made with him managing to
raise her a little and with her slipping back.

Also with their hands separating as the water hits.

Also with their hands separating without the water hitting.

(NOTE: These should be made with Mr. Cotten's and Miss Jones'
hands, and not with doubles)

DISSOLVE TO:

270-271. DAWN - THE SEA CALM - A PEACEFUL SHOT (AS SKETCHED)

CAMERA PANS DOWN or otherwise reveals, by separate cut, if
necessary, the body of Adams stretched out in the protected
section of rock where we have last seen him. There is no
trace of Jennie.

DISSOLVE TO:

272-274. OUT

Sequence omitted from original script.

275. CLOSE SHOT - SCARF - INT. ADAMS' CABIN - DAY

DOLLY BACK from the scarf, now lying on a small table by the
side of a cot. On the cot, wrapped in blankets, is Adams.
His face looks pale and drawn.

AS CAMERA MOVES BACK further, Miss Spinney is revealed sitting
on the foot of the cot, a worried look on her face. Next to
her stands Mathews, nervously rubbing his hands.

SPINNEY
(gently)
Hello, Adams.

ADAMS
(focusing slowly)
Spinney!... What... are you doing
here?

SPINNEY
Mr. Mathews and I had to go up to
Boston on business. We thought we'd
look in on you.

MATTHEWS
(Uneasily)
How do you feel?

ADAMS
(Haltingly)
I feel all right... I...

MATTHEWS
Just take it easy.

ADAMS
Why?

SPINNEY
For heaven's sake, Adams. You've
been out cold for five days. I told
you not to try to drown yourself.

There is an awkward pause while Adams looks from one to
another.

MATTHEWS
(quietly)
They found you on the rocks.

Slowly, the realization of what had happened comes into Adams'
face. He turns away toward the wall.

MATTHEWS
(To Spinney)
Maybe we'd better let him rest.

ADAMS
(to Spinney)
Don't go away, Spinney.

MATTHEWS
I'll get him a cup of coffee.

He goes out.

276. CLOSE TWO SHOT - SPINNEY AND ADAMS

Spinney waits until she hears the door close, then she faces
Adams.

SPINNEY
(gently)
Adams --

ADAMS
Yes?

SPINNEY
You saw Jennie again, didn't you?

ADAMS
(simply)
Yes.

SPINNEY
(gently)
For the last time?

ADAMS
It wasn't the last time. Not really.
I haven't lost her.

SPINNEY
Then everything's all right?

ADAMS
Yes, Spinney -- everything's all
right now.

DISSOLVE TO:

277. INT. METROPOLITAN MUSEUM - DAY (THE PRESENT)

(NOTE: Technicolor to be used as decided later, but also to
be shot in Black and White).

There are two or three girls (16 or 17 years old) standing
at the foot of the portrait, looking up at it (we do not
reveal the portrait). We are probably on a PROFILE of them
or SHOOTING FROM THE ANGLE OF THE PORTRAIT.

FIRST GIRL
(reading inscription)
"Portrait of Jennie."

SECOND GIRL
Isn't she beautiful?

MOVE CAMERA OVER to reveal Miss Spinney just entering. She
stands looking at the girls who are obviously awe-stricken
and whispering about the portrait.

278. ANOTHER ANGLE - THE GIRLS AND SPINNEY

FIRST GIRL
I wonder if she was real?

THIRD GIRL
Oh, she must have been.

FIRST GIRL
Oh, well, what does it matter? She
was real to him or she couldn't look
so alive.

Slowly we see Spinney turn and look at the girl. A smile
comes to her lips.

SPINNEY
(to the girl)
How very wise you are.

The girls look at her, startled.

Slowly, the CAMERA STARTS MOVING IN ON JENNIE'S PORTRAIT and
faintly, as if a whisper, we hear:

JENNIE'S VOICE
I think it's a fine painting, Eben.
I think it will make you famous. I
think some day it will hang in a
museum and people will come from all
over the world to see it. And --
maybe they'll even know me because
of it.

The CAMERA stops on the portrait.

JENNIE'S VOICE
I love you, Eben. No matter if we're
apart, we'll always be together.

FADE OUT:

THE END