"In writing fiction, the more fantastic the tale, the plainer the prose should be. Don't ask your readers to admire your words when you want them to believe your story." - Ben Bova [ more quotes ]

"THE NAKED CITY"

Screenplay by

Albert Maltz and Malvin Wald

Story by Malvin Wald

SHOOTING DRAFT

1948



FADE IN:

EXT. LONG SHOT OF LOWER MANHATTAN A MOONLIT - NIGHT

NARRATOR
(an easy,
conversational tone)
A city has many faces --

EXT. MIDTOWN MANHATTAN - NIGHT

NARRATOR
It's one o'clock in the morning now --

EXT. WALL STREET - NIGHT DESERTED

NARRATOR
And this is the face of New York
City --

EXT. STATUE OF PROMETHEUS IN THE CENTER OF THE RADIO CITY
BUILDINGS - NIGHT

NARRATOR
-- when it's asleep --

The fountain beneath the statue bubbles quietly.

NARRATOR
-- on a hot summer night --

INT. THE MAIN FLOOR OF A LARGE BANK - NIGHT DESERTED

NARRATOR
Does money ever sleep, I wonder?

INT. A LARGE CLOTHING FACTORY - NIGHT

Night lights cast shadows over the silent machines.

NARRATOR
Does a machine become tired?

INT. STAGE OF THE METROPOLITAN OPERA - NIGHT

Scenery on the empty stage is lit by a few night lights.

NARRATOR
Or a song?

EXT. EMPIRE STATE BUILDING - NIGHT

We see the flat, monumental surface of stone rising to the
sky.

NARRATOR
Does stone ever feel weariness?

INT. A MODEST APARTMENT BEDROOM - NIGHT

Windows open, a fan humming. A man lies asleep, face down,
sprawled out; his hair is tousled, his pajama top open and
twisted, the sheet thrown back.

MAN'S VOICE
(wearily)
Some people think it's easy to be a
bank teller. Oh brother!

EXT. AN EAST-SIDE TENEMENT FIRE ESCAPE - NIGHT

A husband and wife are sleeping on bad clothes on the fire
escape.

MAN'S VOICE
(reflectively)
I wonder how many stitches in a dress?
I'll have to count 'em sometime.

There is a SOUND: of a caterwauling cat.

The woman turns over. CAMERA HOLDS on sleeping couple.

CAMERA PANS DOWN TO:

WOMAN'S VOICE
(amused)
I wonder how many meals I've cooked
in my life? And how many dishes I've
washed?

EXT. CAT - NIGHT

digging into an open garbage pail. Nearby another cat sits
patiently.

NARRATOR
A city asleep --

EXT. THE SKY - NIGHT

We see the silhouette of a plane with its lights winking for
a landing.

NARRATOR
-- or as nearly asleep --

EXT. THE CITY AS SEEN FROM THE PLANE - NIGHT

We see the outline of the boroughs, the lighted bridges that
link them, the lighted arteries and veins, the upthrust
fingers of stone.

NARRATOR
-- as any city ever is.

EXT. SINGLE ELEVATED TRAIN MOVING SLOWLY ON ITS TRACKS -
NIGHT

SOUND: Train wheels.

NARRATOR
The pulse of a city like the pulse
of a man --

EXT. TUGBOAT ON THE HUDSON TOWING TWO BARGES LOADED WITH
FREIGHT - NIGHT

SOUND: Boat whistle.

NARRATOR
-- can be felt in sleep, slow and
steady --

INT. ATTENDANT IN AN ELECTRIC CO. SUB STATION - NIGHT

SOUND: Hum of dynamos.

NARRATOR
For some men earn their bread at
night.

INT. A DISC JOCKEY PUTTING A RECORD ON A TURNTABLE IN A
RADIO STATION

SOUND: A hot jive recording that blends into the click of
linotype keys.

JOCKEY'S VOICE
(fast)
It starts hot and it ends gutty.
Let's go.

INT. A LINOTYPE OPERATOR AT HIS MACHINE IN A NEWSPAPER PRESS
ROOM - NIGHT

OPERATOR'S VOICE
Wonder what the ol' lady made me for
lunch tonight? If it's liverwurst
again she's got a divorce.

INT. A CLEANING WOMAN VACUUMING A CARPET IN THE LOBBY OF THE
RADIO CITY MUSIC HALL - NIGHT

SOUND: Low hum of the vacuum cleaner.

WOMAN'S VOICE
(wearily, over vacuum
sound)
From where I stand this world's made
up of nothin' but dirty feet.

INT. A DRUNKEN, UNSHAVEN BUM IS WATCHING A WINDOW DRESSER IN
A SMART FIFTH AVENUE DRESS SHOP - NIGHT

The Dresser is having difficulty in pulling a girdle down
over the length of a dummy figure. A sign over the shop reads:
Madge Livingston.

BUM'S VOICE
(Hoarse)
Hey, buddy, do they pay you for that
or --
(as girdle slips into
place over hips)
-- whoops!

INT. WELL-FURNISHED APARTMENT - NIGHT

A group of well-dressed, middle-aged men and women are playing
bridge and drinking. Among them are Dr. and Mrs. Lawrence
Stoneman.

SOUND: Rhumba music.

NARRATOR
And while some people work and most
sleep, others are at the close of an
evening of relaxation --

SOUND CONTINUES OVER INTO:

INT. NIGHT CLUB - NIGHT

Focusing on a ringside table where a couple -- Ruth Young
and Robert Niles -- are watching floor show.

On the bass drum of the orchestra are the words: Trinidad
Club.

SOUND: Music swells to a more and more intense beat and then
is suddenly cut off.

INT. A WELL-FURNISHED BEDROOM - NIGHT

The only light is from the moon through the half-raised shade.

We dimly perceive an act of murder: a woman on a bed is being
chloroformed by two men. She is in a nightgown. One man,
Garza, holds her from behind. The other, Backalis, holds a
handkerchief over her face. Her body twists spasmodically,
uselessly.

There is no sound except the creaking of the bed and the
heavy breathing of the men.

NARRATOR
(voice sharp, intense)
And still another -- is at the close
of her life.

The woman's struggles cease. She slumps back. The men hold
her still, the handkerchief over her face. Both men are
wearing gloves. We can't see the faces of either man. One of
them (Backalis) is wearing a distinctive jacket.

BACKALIS
(nervous whisper)
Let's go.

GARZA
(angry whisper)
Don't be a fool. This has to be sure.
Lift her up.

The men lift the body.

BACKALIS
(nervously)
Whatcha gonna do?

GARZA
(slight laugh)
It's a hot night. We'll give her a
bath.

They carry the woman into the adjoining bathroom. They lower
her into tub. CAMERA FOLLOWS A HAND as it turns on the faucet
and the water rushes out.

EXT. A STREET - DAWN

CLOSE SHOT WATER RUSHING OUT

Water is flowing from a spigot on a street-washing machine
that is proceeding slowly down a street in the East Sixties.
First faint morning light.

NARRATOR
(quietly)
A hot night working its way toward
dawn. And everything is as usual --

EXT. A TRUCK LADEN WITH GREEN VEGETABLES EMERGING FROM THE
HOLLAND TUNNEL - DAWN

NARRATOR
Jersey lettuce for New York markets --

EXT. WEST WASHINGTON POULTRY MARKET - DAWN

A chicken escapes from a crate and a man runs after it.

NARRATOR
Tonight's fricassee is somewhat
reluctant --

INT. FIRE HOUSE - DAWN

CAMERA is shooting from open doorway at interior. A man at
desk, the fire trucks, a sleeping dalmatian dog.

NARRATOR
Everything as usual --

EXT. EAST SIDE PIER IN SHADOWS - DAWN

Two men are walking to edge of pier.

NARRATOR
-- and even this, too, can be called
routine in a city of eight million
people --

CLOSE SHOT BACKALIS AND GARZA

Backalis, holding a bottle of whiskey, is drunk. Garza watches
him carefully. Both men are in shadows. As Backalis talks,
he sits down on edge of pier and looks out over water. He
turns so that we see his face. We don't see Garza's face in
entire scene.

BACKALIS
(drunkenly --
tragically)
I done a lot of things but I never
killed nobody... Gonna stay drunk
for a long time... Don't know what
I'm gonna say to God when my time
comes. He's got a big heart, I'm
told, but He don't like --

Backalis never finishes. Garza swings his fist from behind
and hits Backalis a blow behind the ear. There is a dull
thud as Backalis topples over, his head striking the pier.
Garza kneels, pulls the bottle of whiskey out of his hand.

GARZA
(angrily)
I thought you were off the liquor?
(angrily -- during
action)
Liquor is bad. Weakens your character --
fuzzes your brain -- turns you soft.
How can a man like me trust a liar
like you? I can't!

Garza angrily throws the whiskey bottle over the pier. We
HEAR a splash. Quickly he thrusts his hand into Backalis's
pocket, takes out a chamois bag, puts it in his own. He
removes Backalis's wallet, tosses it over. He looks around
swiftly, then lifts Backalis with his powerful arms.

Garza heaves Backalis over edge of pier. A low splash. Garza
rises, spits angrily into water, starts off.

EXT. THE SKY - DAWN

IT IS STREAKED BY MORNING LIGHT

NARRATOR
(softly)
How many things this sky has seen --

EXT. SKY OVER MIDTOWN - DAWN

BUILDINGS IN SHOT. SKY IS GROWING LIGHT

NARRATOR
(softly)
-- that man has done to man.

DISSOLVE TO:

EXT. SKY - DAY

NARRATOR
And now it's morning.

INT. BEDROOM - DAY

A baby in a crib is howling. Mother enters shot, putting on
robe. Lifts baby. Smiles fondly, looking at it as it yowls.

She kisses baby.

MOTHER'S VOICE
Some babies are eight o'clock babies.
Some babies are seven o'clock babies.
Why do you have to be a six o'clock
baby?

EXT. THE BOWERY - DAY

A drunk is sleeping in a doorway. The sunlight streams down
through the elevated tracks onto his face. He stirs and blinks --
and turns over for another snooze.

SOUND: EARLY MORNING TRAFFIC

NARRATOR
We wake up variously --

EXT. TENEMENT FIRE ESCAPE WE SAW EARLIER - DAY

An alarm on window sill goes off. Woman and man awaken. Man
shuts off alarm, leans on elbow, yawns...

NARRATOR
-- each to his taste.

INT. KITCHEN OF SMALL HOUSE - DAY

An Italian family. A father and two grown sons are eating
breakfast. The mother is making sandwiches for three lunch
pails that stand with tops open.

NARRATOR
(conversationally)
We've washed and we've shaven and
it's breakfast time.

INT. A MASTER DINING ROOM IN A FIFTH AVENUE MANSION - DAY

An old man, looking very unhappy, sits at one end of a long,
bare table, staring at a glass of milk. A butler hovers near
him.

OLD MAN'S VOICE
(in complaint)
Milk! Isn't there anything else for
ulcers except milk?

INT. MODEST KITCHEN - DAY

Mulvey is making breakfast. He has a toaster going. On stove
two eggs are boiling. He is watching a three-minute sand
glass that will tell him when the eggs are ready. He goes to
front door, still humming, opens it, reaches down for a bottle
of coffee cream. He returns, pours coffee. Puts cream in it.

CLOSE SHOT COFFEE Cream is sour. It curdles.

MULVEY

He stops humming, makes a face. He pours coffee in sink.
Starts to hum again as he takes eggs off.

MULVEY
(singing and humming
lightly)
After the ball was over, After the
ball was done, da-da-da-da-, da-da-
da...
(continues)

EXT. TIMES SQUARE ORANGE DRINK STAND - DAY

A customer, eye on wrist watch, gulping coffee, runs.

NARRATOR
And it's time to go to work.

EXT. HALLORAN, WIFE AND FOUR-YEAR-OLD BOY ON FRONT STEPS OF
A TWO-FAMILY HOUSE IN QUEENS - DAY

HALLORAN
(straight-faced)
Goodbye, Mrs. Halloran.

MRS. HALLORAN
Goodbye, Mr. Halloran.

They shake hands, then kiss. Halloran ruffles boy's hair.

HALLORAN
(mock rough)
See you tonight, Mac.

BOY
(imitating him)
So long, bud.

Halloran goes off with a smile and a wave.

EXT. SUBWAY ENTRANCE - DAY

People walking down.

MAN'S VOICE
Gonna be a scorcher today.

GIRL'S VOICE
(nasal)
If it's as bad as yesterday, I'll
die, I'll be prostrate.

INT. SUBWAY STATION - DAY

People crowding platform.

SOUND: Approaching train.

FIRST GIRL'S VOICE
I went to Jones Beach last night.
Had a picnic.

SECOND GIRL'S VOICE
With the boy friend?

FIRST GIRL'S VOICE
(dreamily)
Yeah.

SECOND GIRL'S VOICE
Did he get fresh again?

FIRST GIRL'S VOICE
(dreamily)
Yeah.

SECOND GIRL'S VOICE
Gee -- you was born with a silver
spoon.

EXT. AN APARTMENT HOUSE - DAY

A woman nods to a doorman as she enters an apartment house.

NARRATOR
For this woman, the day will not be
ordinary --

INT. FOYER OF APARTMENT HOUSE - DAY

NARRATOR
Martha Swenson, forty-two years old,
a widow --

CAMERA FOLLOWS woman to elevator. She rings elevator bell.
Door opens. She enters.

INT. HALLWAY - DAY

Elevator opens. Martha comes out, crosses to apartment
opposite, opens door.

NARRATOR
-- lives a quiet life as a house
worker --

INT. JEAN DEXTER'S APARTMENT - DAY

CAMERA is shooting from Martha's POV as she enters living
room. The blinds are drawn so that the light is dim. Martha
hesitates at doorway, then enters quietly. The room is
attractively furnished. Martha puts her purse down, crosses
to bedroom door, listens. She knocks softly, knocks again.
She opens door, peeks in. Bedroom is dark, blinds drawn. She
sees that bed is unoccupied. She goes in.

MARTHA
Miss Dexter?

She crosses to blind and then notices an overturned, smashed
lamp. As she crosses to it we hear a SOUND from open bathroom
door of water dropping from a tap that has not been completely
shut. Martha looks toward bathtub. With her, we see that the
tub is almost ready to overflow.

CLOSE SHOT ON MARTHA'S FACE

as she walks into bathroom. Her face is suddenly convulsed
by horror. Her mouth opens in a soundless scream. Then she
turns and runs.

MARTHA
(shouting)
Help me... Someone help me...

EXT. NEW YORK CITY POLICE HEADQUARTERS ON CENTRE STREET -
DAY

INSERT SIGN READING:

POLICE HEADQUARTERS TELEGRAPH BUREAU

SOUND in BG: A mixture of clicking teletype machines and
voices of telephone operators.

INT. PANEL OF HUGE TELEPHONE SWITCHBOARDS - DAY

A ROW OF FAST-WORKING WOMEN OPERATORS ARE AT THE SWITCHBOARD

CAMERA MOVES IN to CLOSEUP of a WOMAN OPERATOR as she takes
a call.

OPERATOR
(writing on pad)
Yes, sir. What's your name, please?
...Thank you.
(reaches for telephone
plug)

INSERT TELEPHONE PLUG

being inserted into board under label:

POLYCLINIC HOSPITAL

EXT. POLYCLINIC HOSPITAL - DAY

as ambulance starts into street.

INT. WOMAN TELEPHONE OPERATOR - DAY

OPERATOR
(into mouthpiece)
One-nine-eight West Six-nine Street.
Apartment 4-D.

INT. RADIO ROOM - DAY

A shirt-sleeved patrolman is speaking into a telephone.

FIRST PATROLMAN
(into phone)
Apartment 4-D. Got it.

He writes on a slip of paper, gets up, and walks over to a
series of tables.

INT. PATROLMEN AT PLOTTING TABLES - DAY

These plotting tables have sectional maps of Manhattan on
top. On the maps are little round numbered metallic discs
indicating location of police patrol cars.

INT. PATROLMEN - DAY

FIRST PATROLMAN
(handing paper to man
at table)
20th Precinct. What's out?

INSERT SECTION OF TABLE-TOP MAP SHOWING TWO METALLIC DISCS
NUMBERED 206 AND 159

SECOND PATROLMAN'S VOICE
Two-oh-six and one-five-nine.

INT. TWO PATROLMEN - DAY

First patrolman writes on a slip of paper, and brings it
over to a radio operator at a microphone. The operator glances
at the paper.

INT. RADIO OPERATOR AT MICROPHONE - DAY

The call letters on the microphone are W-E-P-G.

OPERATOR
(into microphone)
Cars two-oh-six -- and one-five-nine --
Cars two-oh-six -- and one-five-nine --
Proceed to one-nine-eight-West --

INSERT TELEPHONE OPERATOR plugging in another call.

INSERT LABEL ON POLICE SWITCHBOARD READING:

MEDICAL EXAMINER

INT. AUTOPSY ROOM AT MORGUE - DAY

The medical examiner, Dr. Simeon Hoffman, is a paunchy, grey-
haired man wearing a surgeon's gown. He is speaking into
phone. He puts down phone and starts to write a note.

INSERT POLICE SWITCHBOARD LABEL MARKED:

TECHNICAL RESEARCH LABORATORY

as plug is inserted.

INT. TECHNICAL RESEARCH LABORATORY - DAY

LAB TABLES AND MICROSCOPES ARE EVIDENT IN BG

NICK, a dark-haired man of thirty-five, puts down phone. He
takes a puff on a lighted cigarette, writes on a pad, rips
off the sheet of paper, and starts to assemble equipment.

INSERT POLICE DEPARTMENT SWITCHBOARD LABEL READING:

MANHATTAN HOMICIDE SQUAD

EXT. 10TH PRECINCT STATION HOUSE -- 230 W. 20TH STREET

INT. STATION HOUSE - DAY

showing sergeant at desk and a few uniformed patrolmen nearby.

CAMERA MOVES UP to a sign near a stairway. Sign reads:

MANHATTAN HOMICIDE SQUAD THIRD FLOOR

INT. THIRD FLOOR CORRIDOR - DAY

SIGN ON A DOOR READS:

CAPTAIN SAM DONAHUE LIEUTENANT DANIEL MULVEY

DISSOLVE THROUGH TO:

INT. DONAHUE'S OFFICE - DAY

CAPTAIN SAM DONAHUE is at his desk, looking at a folder. He
is a husky man of sixty with a wide, pleasant smile and an
intelligent face. Seated in a chair nearby is Lieutenant Dan
Mulvey, whom we saw, earlier, at breakfast. He is a short,
middle-aged man, who might pass for a bookkeeper. His speech
contains a bit of Irish and a lot of Brooklyn. He is smoking
a pipe. He has a second folder in his lap.

There is nothing in the manner, dress or speech of either
man to suggest the accepted notion of policeman or detective.

DONAHUE
(looking up from folder)
I don't understand this boy Del
Vecchio.

MULVEY
(slowly)
I do, Sam... I think.

DONAHUE
Do you make any sense out of what he
did?

MULVEY
No -- but I see eighteen years of
feeling lonely and beaten. So he --
(gestures)
exploded.

DONAHUE
(thoughtfully)
Maybe... Sometimes I wonder what the
human heart's made out of.

MULVEY
My wife, rest her soul, always said
she'd rather look into a man's heart
than into his head -- that you could
tell more about him.

Donahue turns as BEN MILLER, a chunky police stenographer in
plain clothes, enters. He hands a slip of paper to Donahue.

MILLER
This just came in, Captain.
(to Mulvey, as he
goes out)
Morning, Lieutenant.

MULVEY
Morning, Ben.

DONAHUE
(reading paper)
You're free, aren't you, Dan?

MULVEY
I haven't had a hard day's work since
yesterday.

DONAHUE
(handing him paper)
Woman drowned in a bathtub. Your
assignment.

Mulvey nods, gets up, looking at paper.

MULVEY
Who's to do my leg work?

DONAHUE
How about young Halloran again?

MULVEY
(going toward door)
All right. I like the boy.

DONAHUE
How's he doing?

MULVEY
He's makin' the same mistakes I made
at his age.

DONAHUE
Too bad. I thought he showed promise.

Mulvey reacts, goes out.

INT. MANHATTAN HOMICIDE SQUAD OFFICE - DAY

A large office with several desks and chairs behind a wooden
railing. Through an open door can be seen some of the cots
of the dormitory where men on night duty sleep. On a bench
talking to Ben Miller is Detective James Halloran, the tall,
pleasant-looking young man whom we saw saying good-bye earlier
to his wife. Mulvey takes his hat off a hat rack. He comes
up behind the bench and pauses a foot away to listen to
Halloran, who is talking seriously, with great interest in
what he's saying.

HALLORAN
-- but that's the point, Ben. In the
first six months of a baby's life,
the father can't get to know it unless
he takes care of it physically. The
idea is to do things for the kid --
like bathing it.

MILLER
But I'm scared to bathe mine. Looks
like it'll break.

HALLORAN
Then learn how to change it. Is it a
bottle baby?

MILLER
(boastfully)
Not mine, he's...

MULVEY
Begging your pardon -- is this the
Board of Directors of the Diaper
Institute?

HALLORAN
(rising)
Hi, Dan.

MULVEY
We're on a case, you baby experts.

HALLORAN
(eagerly)
What sort of a case? Something hot?

MULVEY
(as they go)
Dead woman in a bathtub. Something
cold.

They go out.

DISSOLVE TO:

EXT. APARTMENT HOUSE ON WEST 69TH STREET - DAY

The ambulance, seen earlier, and two police cars are parked
in front. A small crowd of people is gathered around the
entrance. A dark police sedan drives up. Mulvey, Halloran,
Miller step out.

EXT. ENTRANCE TO APARTMENT HOUSE - DAY

CAMERA IS SHOOTING from POV of watching crowd.

PATROLMAN
(to Mulvey, with a
slight hand salute)
This way, Lieutenant.

Mulvey, Halloran, and Miller pin their badges on their coat
lapels as they follow the patrolman.

EXT. TO ONE SIDE OF ENTRANCE MIDDLE-AGED GENTLEMAN,
NURSEMAID, GIRL - DAY

as they look after detectives. The middle-aged gentleman is
tall, thin, shabby, but with pretense to elegance. He carries
a walking stick, wears pince-nez spectacles. The nursemaid
is thirtyish, bovine, in uniform. The girl is five.

MIDDLE-AGED GENTLEMAN
(to nursemaid)
Detectives! You see! I told you it
was a murder. I knew!

LITTLE GIRL
(pulling nursemaid's
hand)
I wanna go to the park. I wanna see
the seals.

MIDDLE-AGED GENTLEMAN
(to nursemaid)
I have the finest crime library in
the world... with pictures.

LITTLE GIRL
(wailing)
I wanna see the seals.

NURSEMAID
(angrily)
You saw the seals yesterday. This is
a murder. It'll educate you.

INT. IN FRONT OF JEAN DEXTER'S APARTMENT - DAY

A patrolman at door gives a half salute, admits detectives.

INT. LIVING ROOM - DAY

Two plainclothes detectives are standing in the room. The
maid, Martha Swenson, is seated in an easy chair. She is
distraught and evidently has been crying. Near her is NED
HARVEY, the apartment superintendent, a thin, middle-aged
man, wearing work pants and a grey sweater. Throughout scene
Miller takes shorthand notes of what is said.

MULVEY
Who's in charge here?

One of the plainclothes detectives steps forward.

DETECTIVE
Me, sir -- Detective Sergeant
Shaeffer, 20th Precinct.

MULVEY
What's the story?

SHAEFFER
(consulting notebook)
The dead woman's name is Jean Dexter.
Twenty-six years old, unmarried. She
used to be a dress model at Madge
Livingston's, on Fifth Avenue. Her
parents live in Lakewood, New Jersey.
Their name is Batory -- that's Polish.
Her name used to be Mary Batory until
she came to New York. The ambulance
doctor says she died of drowning...
that's all I have.

MULVEY
(to Miller)
Got it?

Miller nods, scribbling. Puffing on his pipe, Mulvey walks
over to an end table and squats down a little to look at a
framed photograph without touching it.

INSERT BEAUTIFUL BLONDE GIRL IN EVENING DRESS

MULVEY'S VOICE
This her?

SHAEFFER'S VOICE
Yeah.

INT. BACK TO SCENE - DAY

Mulvey looks inquiringly at Martha Swenson.

SHAEFFER
Martha Swenson, the woman's
housekeeper. She found the body.
(indicating Harvey)
Mr. Harvey, the house superintendent.
He called headquarters.

MULVEY
(nodding)
Where's the body?

SHAEFFER
(pointing)
In there.

Mulvey starts toward bedroom followed by Halloran and Miller.

INT. BEDROOM - DAY

On the bed is a body covered by a sheet. Standing by the bed
is a uniformed patrolman. A white-coated ambulance doctor is
filling out a paper form. The door to the bathroom is open,
with part of the tub visible.

As Mulvey sees the body on the bed, he stops.

MULVEY
(quiet... but angry)
Didn't this woman drown in a bathtub,
doctor?

DOCTOR
She was on the bed when I got here.

Mulvey goes toward living room angrily.

INT. LIVING ROOM - DAY

as Mulvey comes into doorway.

MULVEY
Who moved the body?

MARTHA
(rising; upset)
When I came in and... saw her like
that in the tub... I called Mr.
Harvey, here. He -- helped me.

MULVEY
(sharply)
You should've waited for the police!
Both of you should have known better.

MARTHA
(wringing hands)
I was so upset...

HALLORAN
(entering)
There's a bottle of pills under the
bed, Dan. Looks like sleeping pills.

MULVEY
(holding out hand)
Let me see 'em.

HALLORAN
(startled)
I left 'em there.

MULVEY
Why, thank you for that, Jimmy.
(looks at Martha and
Harvey)
This is moving day around here. I
thought maybe you caught the fever.

HALLORAN
About those pills... maybe the dame
took an overdose?

MULVEY
(patiently)
Jimmy, it's our obligation to wait
for the medical examiner. He's a
learned physician employed by the
city to determine the causes of
mysterious deaths. Let the good man
earn his money.

Halloran grins with slight embarrassment.

DISSOLVE TO:

INT. BEDROOM GROUP (FAVORING DR. HOFFMAN) - DAY

Standing by the bed is the medical examiner, whom we saw
earlier; Mulvey, Halloran are with him. Ben Miller is taking
notes in the background. Nick, whom we saw earlier in the
Technical Laboratory, is standing by with his spray equipment
for fingerprints.

DR. HOFFMAN
No accident and no suicide. There
are bruises on her throat, shoulders
and arms. Those slight burns around
her mouth and nose were caused by
chloroform. She was chloroformed
after a struggle, then dumped into
the tub alive.

HALLORAN
(eagerly)
How can you tell that, Doctor?

HOFFMAN
By the white foam around her mouth.
It's proof she drowned.
(to Mulvey; indicating
Halloran)
New?

MULVEY
(nodding)
New.

INT. ANOTHER ANGLE THE GROUP - DAY

A police photographer has set up his lighting equipment and
large 8-by-10 camera.

PHOTOGRAPHER
(to Mulvey)
Okay, Lieutenant?

MULVEY
(to Hoffman)
Okay, Doctor?

DR. HOFFMAN
(putting instruments
away)
The body's yours.

MULVEY
Start working, gentlemen.

The room becomes very active. Halloran goes into bathroom.
Photographer begins taking flashlight pictures of room, bed,
etc. Nick begins to spray a glass on a night table with a
colored powder from an atomizer, seeking fingerprints.

Mulvey writes a note, looks at bed, writes another note.
Halloran comes out of bathroom with a pair of men's silk
pajamas.

HALLORAN
Dan... these were in the laundry
hamper. No laundry marks and no label.

Mulvey takes the pajamas, feels the material.

MULVEY
Real fancy. You don't get these for
three ninety-five.
(to Nick)
Pick up these pajamas on your way
out, Nick. I want 'em under your X-
ray machine.

NICK
Right.

Mulvey, followed by Halloran and Miller, goes into living
room.

INT. LIVING ROOM - DAY

Martha Swenson and Harvey are seated on a couch as Mulvey,
Shaeffer, and Halloran enter the room. Patrolman stands at
door. Throughout this scene we get flashes of light from the
busy photographer in the bedroom.

MULVEY
Who belongs to these?

MARTHA
I -- I don't know, sir.
(wringing hands)
I'm so unstrung.

MULVEY
(quietly)
I know you are. But I think you'd
like to help us.

MARTHA
I would -- I would. Such a sweet
girl, she was. A little wild, by my
standards maybe, but live and let
live, I say. Always treated me swell.

MULVEY
The pajamas, Martha.

MARTHA
I'm all in pieces. I...

Mulvey holds out the pajamas.

MARTHA
(hesitantly)
They could belong to Mr. Henderson.
(wringing hands)
This is awful. I might be getting
someone in trouble.

MULVEY
We don't want to get the wrong person
in trouble either... What's his first
name?

MARTHA
(in a rush)
Philip, I think. He lives in
Baltimore. That's what she told me.
I only saw him once or twice. I only
know he was an admirer of Miss
Dexter's.

MULVEY
(fingering pajamas)
Seems likely.

MARTHA
Oh, I'm all in little pieces. What a
nightmare!

MULVEY
You're being a big help to us,
Martha... How old would you say Mr.
Henderson is?

MARTHA
Oh... fifty about.

MULVEY
What does he look like?

MARTHA
Oh -- he's real distinguished, real.
About as tall as him.
(points to Halloran)
Got grey hair. And strong-looking
for his age. No corporation on him,
if you know what I mean.

MULVEY
Uh-huh.
(to Miller)
Got it?
(Miller nods... to
Harvey)
Do you know Henderson?

HARVEY
Never saw him.

MULVEY
(to Miller)
Shoot a wire on this to Baltimore.

Miller nods. Hoffman comes into living room, carrying medical
case.

HOFFMAN
Here's the ring she was wearing.
(Mulvey takes ring)
I'll phone you after the autopsy...
Have fun.

MULVEY
(looking at ring)
Likewise.

Hoffman goes out.

MARTHA
(eagerly)
Sir... that ring... it's a black
star sapphire... very rare. She said
her brother sent it from India.

MULVEY
Did she have any other jewelry?

MARTHA
Oh -- a lot. Valuable. She kept it
in a jewel box, locked.

MULVEY
Let's go get it.
(as Martha hesitates)
Please.

Hesitantly Martha goes into bedroom, the others following.
At the moment of their entrance, Nick is spraying the surface
of the vanity table with iodine vapor. The photographer,
lying on his side, is making a photograph of the floor beneath
the bed.

PHOTOGRAPHER
(to Nick)
Okay... You can pick up that bottle
under the bed now.

NICK
(spraying)
Check.

MULVEY
Nick -- can we open a drawer in that
table?

NICK
Yeah. I've gone over them.

MARTHA
(horrified)
What are you doing to the furniture?

NICK
(smiling)
Investigating it.

During the ensuing scene, Nick puts down the atomizer, crawls
under bed and gets the bottle out by means of looping a string
over the neck of it.

MULVEY
Come on, Martha.

Martha opens a drawer. A startled look comes to her face.
She frantically pulls open the other drawer.

MARTHA
She had bracelets and rings... diamond
rings... They're all gone. It must
have been thieves that killed her.

MULVEY
(Softly, to Halloran)
Another detective.
(to Martha)
Could you describe the jewelry?

MARTHA
Most of it, I think.

MULVEY
Fine. Go in and rest yourself now.

As Martha goes out, Nick stands up, holding the bottle of
pills by the looped string.

NICK
Looks like Seconal.

MULVEY
(Peering at it)
Jimmy -- I want to start questioning
those two in there. You start your
leg work. Get the number of this
prescription, see the druggist. From
him go to the doctor. Then go to the
dress shop she worked at.

HALLORAN
Right.

He writes down druggist's name and prescription number. The
policeman comes to door of living room.

POLICEMAN
Lieutenant -- the newspaper men are
here.

MULVEY
Okay, I'm coming.
(to Nick)
Getting any fingerprints, Nick?

NICK
Nothing good so far. Half prints,
quarter prints -- that's all.

MULVEY
(going toward living
room... soberly --
to Halloran)
Looks to me like a heavy case -- a
heavy case.

DISSOLVE TO:

EXT. MADISON AVE. - DAY

SOUND: STREET NOISES

Halloran moves to one side to avoid a fat man with an English
bulldog on leash. An itinerant bootblack gestures toward his
shoes but he shakes his head. He pauses at the entrance to a
drugstore on the corner, checks the address against his memo
book, goes in.

NARRATOR
(conversationally,
heard above street
noises)
An investigation for murder is under
way now in the city of New York. It
will advance methodically, by trial
and error, by leg and brain work, by
asking a thousand questions to get
one answer. Ever look for a needle
in a dark house? You can find it --
if you're patient enough. Just get
down on your knees, examine every
inch of every floor of every room --
and you'll find it. The Homicide
Squad, my friends, is made up of
patient men. Ever work a jigsaw
puzzle? Ever try to find a murderer?
Ever play button-button?

INT. DRUGSTORE - DAY

There is no one at the prescription counter. He rings a little
bell placed there for that purpose. The druggist appears, a
short, bald, stout man. Halloran shows him his badge in the
palm of his hand, speaks to him, reads from his memo book.
Druggist disappears for an instant, returns with his
prescription book, turns the pages until he finds the Dexter
prescription.

DRUGGIST AND HALLORAN

DRUGGIST
Dr. Lawrence Stoneman -- office in
the Squibb Building.
(leans forward)
Confidentially -- a doctor in the
dough -- high class.

HALLORAN
(writing)
Do you happen to remember Miss Dexter?

DRUGGIST
(shaking head)
A one-shot customer.

HALLORAN
Not even by the fact you made up
sleeping pills for her?

Druggist laughs, leans forward.

DRUGGIST
Confidentially, half the people in
this city can't sleep without pills.
Hurry up... hurry up... too much
hurry up.

HALLORAN
Thanks. You've been a help.

As Halloran starts out of drugstore CAMERA FOLLOWS HIM.

NARRATOR
Ask a question, get an answer, write
it down...

INT. DEXTER'S LIVING ROOM - DAY

Patrolman at door. Martha Swenson on couch. Mulvey, puffing
his pipe, has memo book in hand. Mulvey has his coat off.

MULVEY
Did she have any other men friends?

MARTHA
None I know of, sir. Just this Niles
man. Robert Niles -- a lovely man.

Mulvey scribbles in memo book, rubs his nose thoughtfully,
rises, crosses living room to bedroom door, opens it.

INT. BEDROOM - DAY

The bedroom lights have been switched off. Nick is operating
a portable ultra-violet lamp. It casts a beam of intense
violet light. He is using it like a searchlight to explore
every inch of the walls. The bedroom has been transformed
since we last saw it -- ripped apart. The bed has been taken
down, wallpaper stained in various spots, lamps taken apart,
etc.

MULVEY
(softly)
How are you doing, Nick?

NICK
(softly)
Not too bad. Found two grey hairs on
the rug.

MULVEY
Grey, eh?... How about fingerprints?

NICK
No good ones yet.

Mulvey closes door, crosses to Martha, looks closely at her
hair. Martha draws back in alarm.

MULVEY
(smiling)
Don't you mind me. Just admirin'
your hair.

Martha smiles a little, flattered.

DISSOLVE TO:

EXT. A STREET - DAY

Halloran is wiping his sweaty face as he walks. He stops,
looks up.

NARRATOR
(leisurely)
Ask a question and take a walk. Hop
a bus and ask a question. Jimmy
Halloran's an expert with his feet.
He pounded a beat in the Bronx for a
year as a cop... during the war he
walked halfway across Europe with a
rifle in his hand. Ever play button-
button in a city of eight million
people --

EXT. SQUIBB BUILDING - DAY

stretching to sky.

EXT. AT THE ENTRANCE - DAY

Halloran is entering building.

INT. DR. STONEMAN'S RECEPTION ROOM - DAY

A medium-sized room, tastefully furnished. Two patients
waiting, both women in their middle years, well dressed. An
elderly nurse at desk. Nurse looks up as Halloran enters. He
approaches desk, speaks quietly.

HALLORAN
Is Dr. Stoneman in?

NURSE
(dubiously)
Do you have an appointment?

HALLORAN
I'm from the Police Department. It's
quite important.
(shows his badge)

NURSE
Just a moment.

She goes out of room. Halloran walks to a large window that
looks out over the city.

INT. THE CITY FROM HALLORAN'S POV - DAY

NARRATOR
There's the layout, Jim. The man who
killed Jean Dexter is somewhere down
there. Can't blame him for hiding,
can you?

NURSE'S VOICE
Dr. Stoneman'll see you.

INT. WAITING ROOM - DAY

Halloran follows nurse through door into a corridor, then
into an office.

INT. STONEMAN'S PRIVATE OFFICE - DAY

Dr. Stoneman, in a white gown, is just coming through another
door from an examination room. He is a handsome, keen-looking
man of fifty, with iron-grey hair. We saw him playing bridge
at 1:00 A.M.

DR. STONEMAN
Yes sir. What can I do for you? Have
a seat.

HALLORAN
(sitting)
I want to ask you about a patient of
yours -- Jean Dexter.

Stoneman, who has been walking around to his swivel chair,
pauses, turns.

DR. STONEMAN
Dexter? Are you sure she's my patient?

HALLORAN
You wrote a prescription for her two
weeks ago -- Seconal.

Stoneman thinks, then nods.

STONEMAN
Yes, a blonde girl. Very handsome, I
remember now... Dexter.
(sits; starts going
through card file)
What department are you from, Officer?

HALLORAN
Homicide.

STONEMAN
(stiffening)
Oh? Don't tell me that girl murdered
someone?

HALLORAN
Someone murdered her.

STONEMAN
What?
(a pause -- very
distressed)
My goodness... when...

HALLORAN
Last night sometime.

A pause. Stoneman shakes his head. Pulls card out of file.

STONEMAN
What do you want to know?

HALLORAN
Whatever you can tell me about her.

STONEMAN
(angrily)
She needed a good spanking. Took
Benzedrine by day, needed sleeping
pills at night. I told her to slow
up -- but no. Life was too short for
her.
(shakes head again)
Burned out now. All her fresh, young
beauty on a scrap heap. Excuse me,
Officer, but I'm a doctor because
I'm interested in people. I hate to
see human beings waste themselves.
(shrugs, falls silent)

HALLORAN
Can you tell me anything else about
her? Her life -- her friends?

STONEMAN
No. Nothing. I only saw her that one
visit.

HALLORAN
I guess that's all, Doctor. Thank
you.
(stands)

Stoneman nods and tosses the card on the desk. Halloran
leaves.

EXT. MADGE LIVINGSTON'S DRESS SHOP ON FIFTH AVENUE - DAY

This is the same shop we saw in the early morning. Two young,
shabbily dressed girls are staring at a glittering evening
dress on dummy in window.

FIRST GIRL
Imagine me in that!

SECOND GIRL
I can't imagine.

FIRST GIRL
In the Sert Room of the Waldorf
Astoria. With Frankie singing.

SECOND GIRL
I can't imagine.

FIRST GIRL
Gosh, I'd commit murder for a dress
like that. It's a pome by Shakespeare,
that's what it is. Lookit that feller.
What do you suppose he's buying?

HALLORAN FROM POV OF THE GIRLS - DAY

He is talking to a woman.

SECOND GIRL'S VOICE
I can't imagine.

FIRST GIRL'S VOICE
Oh, you -- you're so uncooperative I
could slam you.

INT. MADGE LIVINGSTON'S DRESS SHOP - DAY

Mrs. Livingston is handsome, middle-aged, well tailored,
with a fancy way of speaking.

MRS. LIVINGSTON
(seriously)
...and somewhere in the back of her
pretty head there was a fixed notion
that she couldn't be happy without
being rich. I don't think Jean ever
would have married unless the man
had money -- real money.

HALLORAN
Why did you fire her?

MRS. LIVINGSTON
(shrugs)
Gentlemen sometimes come here with
their wives. When Jean Dexter modeled,
many of them left my shop a little
too interested in her. Their wives
didn't like it -- and neither did I.

HALLORAN
I see. Can I talk to her friend now --
the model you spoke about?

MRS. LIVINGSTON
(rising)
Ruth Young? Yes. I'll call her.

She leaves.

EXT. AT SHOP WINDOW - DAY

FIRST GIRL
You see -- he's gonna buy something.
Oh, I can't bear it.

SECOND GIRL
It's getting late. We better go.

FIRST GIRL
So what if we're late?

SECOND GIRL
The boss'll holler.

FIRST GIRL
Let him holler. Strengthen his lungs.
Oh, lookit.

EXT. HALLORAN FROM POV OF THE GIRLS - DAY

Madge Livingston and Ruth Young approaching him.

Ruth Young is a lovely girl in her early twenties. She is
wearing a striking evening gown. As the two girls talk, we
see Mrs. Livingston introduce Halloran and Ruth and leave
them.

FIRST GIRL
Oh, I can't bear it. Oh, I'm going.
What a dress. It's a pome.

SECOND GIRL
A pome. By you everything's a pome.

FIRST GIRL
(leaving)
Oh, Millie -- you got no imagination.

She leaves. Other follows, looking offended.

INT. DRESS SHOP - DAY

Ruth has a quiet, attractive manner, good speech.

HALLORAN
Miss Young -- I understand you modeled
with Jean Dexter?

RUTH
(nodding)
We're friends, too.
(hesitates)
Is she in trouble, Mr. Halloran?

HALLORAN
Well... She is kind of wild, isn't
she?

RUTH
Oh, no... Maybe Mrs. Livingston would
call her wild, but I wouldn't. She's
full of fun... wonderful company.

HALLORAN
Do you know anybody who has cause to
dislike her?

RUTH
No...

HALLORAN
How about Mrs. Henderson?

RUTH
Who's she?

HALLORAN
Well, Miss Dexter and Mr. Henderson
are very friendly, aren't they?

RUTH
She never told me about a man named
Henderson.

HALLORAN
(disappointed)
Are you sure?

RUTH
Really, Mr. Halloran -- Jean's my
friend -- I don't think I want to
answer any more questions unless you
tell me why you're asking them.

HALLORAN
(watching her)
She was found dead this morning.

Ruth gasps. Her face goes white. She looks as though she
will collapse. Halloran grabs her arm, pulls a chair up.

HALLORAN
(gently)
Sit down... Rest a moment.
(Ruth obeys)
I'm sorry.

Halloran walks over to a water cooler for a glass of water.

NARRATOR
Learn anything, Halloran? How does
it add up? Button, button, where's
the button?

DISSOLVE TO:

EXT. 10TH PRECINCT STATION HOUSE - DAY

An elderly fireman has opened a hydrant on this hot summer
day for the neighborhood kids. A half dozen kids in bathing
suits, trunks and underwear shorts are reveling in the water.
A boy of ten, lying on the street, puts his face in the water,
blows bubbles.

BOY
I'm a whale. Lookit...
(blows bubbles)
Lookit me... I'm a whale.

A tough little girl of twelve sneaks up behind him, pushes
his head under water, runs off. During this, two men have
come along street -- Niles and Perelli. Boy gets up, gasping.

BOY
I'll moider you. I'll cut your head
off.

FIREMAN
(reprovingly)
Such language.

One of the two men -- Robert Niles -- laughs.

NILES
(to fireman -- in
passing)
In front of a police station, too.

CAMERA HOLDS on two men going up station steps.

INT. MULVEY'S OFFICE - DAY

A smaller office than Donahue's. Simply furnished. On Mulvey's
desk there is a photograph of a pleasant-looking woman in
her late twenties, with two little girls. They are dressed
in the fashion of 1920. Mulvey is at his desk, Miller in a
chair. Miller is reading from notebook.

MILLER
The janitor's story of his whereabouts
last night is being checked. Ditto
the maid. No report yet on
fingerprints. Constentino is on his
way to Lakewood to see the girl's
parents.

Door opens. One of the two men we saw on the street a moment
earlier comes in. He is Detective Perelli, forty, husky,
hard-faced.

PERELLI
Got Robert Niles, Lieutenant.

MULVEY
Have him in.
(rises, starts cleaning
pipe)

NILES enters, a man in his early thirties. He is tall,
unusually handsome, with a straightforward, attractive quality
about him. He wears a Service Discharge emblem. Perelli shuts
door, sits down in corner.

MULVEY
Thank you for coming down, Mr. Niles.
I'm Lieutenant Mulvey.
(gestures)
Make yourself comfortable. This is
Sergeant Miller.

NILES
(sitting down --
smiling)
How do you do...
(looks around)
I've never been in a police station.
Why'd you want to see me, Lieutenant?

MULVEY
(cleaning pipe)
Just a routine check on something.
Did you ever run across a girl
named...
(looks at paper as
though he had
forgotten name)
...Dexter?

NILES
Jean Dexter? Why, yes... we're good
friends.

MULVEY
How long have you known her?

NILES
A little over a year. She helps me
out in my business occasionally.
She's a model.

MULVEY
What business is that?

NILES
Merchandising consultant.
(hands Mulvey a card)
I help out-of-town buyers get woolens,
dress goods... Anything in the textile
line.

MULVEY
Do you pay Miss Dexter a salary?

NILES
No... just a... bonus from time to
time when she does something.

MULVEY
Like what?

NILES
(shrugs)
Modeling... entertaining somebody
for me.

MULVEY
When did you see her last?

NILES
Yesterday. We had lunch together.
Why?

MULVEY
You haven't seen her since?

NILES
No. Is anything the matter?
(leans forward)

MULVEY
(softly)
She's dead. Murdered.

Niles sinks back, shocked, incredulous. Mulvey watches him.
Perelli leaves quietly.

INT. OUTER OFFICE OF HOMICIDE SQUAD - DAY

Halloran and Ruth come in. Ruth has changed to street clothes.
Halloran motions for her to wait, crosses to a detective at
a desk -- a man of fifty-five, HENRY FOWLER.

HALLORAN
(low-voiced)
Mulvey back yet?

FOWLER
Inside. Talking to a guy.

Halloran presses buzzer on desk and picks up phone.

HALLORAN
(into phone -- low-
voiced)
Dan? Jimmy. Got a girl here -- Ruth
Young. Friend of Dexter's. Model at
Livingston's.

INT. MULVEY'S OFFICE - DAY

MULVEY
(into phone; writing
a memo)
Hold it. I'll buzz.

As Mulvey puts down phone, Niles looks at him, shakes his
head.

NILES
This is terrible. I feel sick over
it.

Niles raises his hands, looks at them. They are trembling.

NILES
(continuing)
My hands haven't trembled like this
since I was in the South Pacific.

MULVEY
(conversationally)
What happened to you there?

NILES
(tossing it off)
Oh... my first time in combat...

MULVEY
What outfit were you in?

NILES
Seventy-seventh...

INT. CLOSE SHOT OF MILLER - DAY

writing down a memo.

MULVEY'S VOICE
I think I had a cousin in that one.
It's a New York division, isn't it?

NILES'S VOICE
Yes.

INT. BACK TO SCENE - DAY

MULVEY
Corporal James Dennis...

NILES
Don't remember him. I was a Captain.

Mulvey, starting to stuff his pipe, looks across the room at
Miller. Miller rises quietly, goes out.

MULVEY
We want to find the person who
murdered Jean Dexter, Mr. Niles.

NILES
(leaning forward --
passionately)
Anything I can tell you!

MULVEY
Anyone you know who might've had a
reason to kill her?

NILES
(shaking head)
Everyone liked Jean.

MULVEY
(glancing at memo
book)
Do you happen to know a friend of
Miss Dexter's called Ruth Young?

NILES
(hesitating)
Ruth Young? No, I... Oh, yes... a
model, isn't she?

MULVEY
I think so. How well do you know
her?

NILES
I've met her once or twice at parties
Jean gave.

Mulvey presses buzzer twice.

MULVEY
And how long did you know Miss Dexter?

NILES
About a year.

MULVEY
See her often?

NILES
Why, yes, I...

The door opens. Halloran appears with Ruth Young. Ruth sees
Niles, who has turned.

RUTH
(running to him)
Robert, why are you here?

NILES
(awkwardly)
Why, hello, Ruth.

Ruth catches hold of his arm, turns to Mulvey angrily.

RUTH
You don't think he could've been
involved in Jean's death? He hardly
knew her.

MULVEY
(flatly)
How do you know?

RUTH
Well, of course I know! Robert and I
are engaged.

MULVEY
Congratulations.

He looks steadily at Niles, who shifts very uneasily.

DISSOLVE TO:

INT. TECHNICAL RESEARCH LAB - DAY

Nick and an assistant are carefully examining Henderson's
pajamas under an X-ray machine.

NARRATOR
The items that make up this murder
are being compiled now...

INT. AUTOPSY ROOM OF THE MORGUE - DAY

Dr. Hoffman, in a surgical gown and mask, wipes the
perspiration off his forehead. His assistant hands him a
surgical instrument.

NARRATOR
They'll be listed in a folder marked
Dexter, Jean... along with some
questions...

EXT. PENNSYLVANIA STATION - DAY

as a detective approaches a taxicab dispatcher. The two men
exchange a few words, and the dispatcher makes a notation in
his notebook.

NARRATOR
Is Henderson the murderer? Did a
taxicab take him to the Pennsylvania
Railroad Station?

INT. BALTIMORE POLICE STATION - DAY

CLOSE SHOT BULLETIN BOARD MARKED: 18TH PRECINCT STATION,
BALTIMORE, MD.

A hand reaches in, pins a notice on board.

NARRATOR
Who is Henderson? Where does he live?
Who knows him?

INSERT OF NOTICE READING:

"Police Chief, Baltimore, MD. Please ascertain info about
resident your city name Philip Henderson age about 50, grey
hair, tall build. Confidential. Quick reply urgent. Mulvey,
New York"

CAMERA PULLS BACK to SHOW several detectives moving in to
read it.

INT. OFFICE BUILDING HALLWAY - DAY

as janitor admits Perelli to office. Sign on door reads:

ROBERT NILES BUSINESS CONSULTANT

INT. NILES'S OFFICE - DAY

PERELLI
(as they enter)
Do you know Niles?

The janitor smiles smugly, waves his hand. He is a small
man, bald.

JANITOR
Sure. I keep tabs on everybody. I'm
sharp.

PERELLI
What kind of a business does he run?

JANITOR
He don't run any.

They are looking around the office now. It is sparsely
furnished.

PERELLI
How do you know?

JANITOR
I'm sharp. Nobody comes to see him.
No secretary. Nothing to clean out
of his waste basket. Don't spend
much time here himself. He's a bust.

Perelli goes to desk, opens side drawers. The first one is
empty. The second has a bottle of whiskey. The third has an
autographed photo of Jean Dexter.

TO SWEETHEART FROM JEAN

Perelli closes drawers, tries middle drawer. It is empty
except for a book: The Campaigns of the South Pacific. Perelli
closes drawer, starts out.

JANITOR
(smugly)
See... told you I was sharp.

INT. OUTER OFFICE OF HOMICIDE SQUAD - DAY

Mulvey is escorting Ruth Young to the door.

MULVEY
I might be wanting to see you again.

RUTH
Any time you say.
(quietly)
Jean was my friend.

MULVEY
You won't leave town without letting
me know?
(opening door)

RUTH
Oh? All right... Good-bye.

MULVEY
'Bye.
(closes door -- turns
to Fowler)
Lovely girl, isn't she? Lovely.

FOWLER
Yeah!

MULVEY
Lovely long legs.

FOWLER
Yeah -- yeah.

MULVEY
Keep looking at 'em.

FOWLER
A pleasure.

Fowler rises, grabs Panama hat, leaves. As Mulvey crosses
back to office, Miller holds up his hand to intercept him.
Miller is talking on the phone, seated at a desk. He is
scribbling a note.

MILLER
(into phone)
Thanks.

He hangs up, rises, speaks to Mulvey.

MILLER
Couple of things. One: Medical
examiner called in. Dexter died
between one and two A.M.

MULVEY
I see.

MILLER
(handing him memo)
And here are a few interesting items
on our friend inside.

Mulvey reads the memo, exchanges a look with Miller, then
goes into his office, followed by Miller.

INT. MULVEY'S OFFICE - DAY

as Mulvey and Miller enter. Niles is seated, smoking
comfortably. Halloran is sitting behind him.

MULVEY
(with a smile)
Mr. Niles...

NILES
(returning smile --
gracefully)
These things happen, Lieutenant. I
told you I didn't know Ruth Young
very well. Now you know we're engaged.
(grins)
Can't blame a man for wanting to
keep his fiancée out of a murder
case, can you?

MULVEY
(pleasantly)
I never had a fiancée in a murder
case.
(ingratiatingly)
And just between ourselves... you
never told your fiancée what good
friends you and Miss Dexter were --
did you?

NILES
Ruth's a bit jealous, Lieutenant.
(frankly)
You understand...

MULVEY
Uh huh... I wonder now... is there
anything else you told me that
isn't... strictly true?

NILES
(earnestly)
I have no reason to lie to you,
Lieutenant.

MULVEY
(softly)
I've got a report in front of me
says you never were in the South
Pacific, Mr. Niles. You weren't in
the 77th Division. You weren't an
officer. You weren't in the Army.

Niles's smile has faded. He looks wretched.

NILES
(miserably)
I suppose you think I'm a heel...
(passionately)
I didn't even wait for the draft. I
tried to enlist. They wouldn't take
me. I've got a trick knee from college
football. I just couldn't get in.

MULVEY
That's all right with me... but why
lie about it?

NILES
I don't know. Stupid pride, I suppose.

MULVEY
How did you spend the war years, Mr.
Niles?

NILES
I was in Chicago. Same business I
have now.

MULVEY
Been at it long?

NILES
Six or seven years. Since college.

MULVEY
Doing pretty well?

NILES
Very good these days.

Mulvey picks up phone, buzzes at same time.

MULVEY
(into phone)
Is Perelli back?
(pause)
Send him in.
(pause)

Mulvey smiles at Niles. Niles smiles back. Door opens, Perelli
enters.

MULVEY
What can you tell us about Mr. Niles's
business?

Niles stiffens.

PERELLI
He ain't got a business. It's a dodge.
No credit rating. Dropped from his
university club for nonpayment of
dues. Still owes a food and liquor
bill of $110.83.

A pause. Niles looks very crestfallen.

MULVEY
(genially)
I've been thirty-eight years on the
force, Mr. Niles. I've been a cop on
the beat, I've been with the Safe
and Loft Squad, I've been twenty-two
years in the Homicide Division. But
in a lifetime of interrogatin' an'
investigation', you are probably the
biggest an' most willing liar I ever
met.

NILES
(bursting out)
All right, I'm a liar. I'm a circus
character altogether. But I didn't
kill Jean Dexter. I told you where I
was last night. Why don't you check
on that?

MULVEY
We're doing that right now.

NILES
(angrily)
Okay then. That's fine.
(suddenly -- a change
of mood)
I'm sorry. I'm not angry at you,
Lieutenant. You're just doing your
job. The truth is I'm ashamed of
myself.
(frankly)
My family used to have money and
position. Since I got out of college,
I haven't been much of a success.
I'm trying to keep up a front...
(earnestly)
But I'm only a small-time liar,
Lieutenant. Believe me. On important
things I'm straight as a die.

MULVEY
(softly)
Every man to his taste.

NILES
Ask me anything you want. Jean was
my friend. I want to help you.

MULVEY
(consulting notebook)
You spent close to fifty dollars
last night at the Trinidad Club.
Where'd you get the money?

Niles hesitates, then speaks frankly, with obvious shame.

NILES
I play a sharp game of bridge with
Park Avenue friends. I take a flier
on the stock market. On inside tips.
When I'm hard up, I borrow money...
That's the truth.

MULVEY
Thank you...
(consulting notebook)
Now about this man Henderson. You
say you only met him once in Miss
Dexter's apartment. Would you describe
him to me?

NILES
Well... medium height; husky; blonde
hair; wore glasses... looked to be
about thirty-five...

MULVEY
Uh... huh...

Phone RINGS.

MULVEY
(into phone)
Lieutenant Mulvey...
(listens with interest)
Yes... Yes...
(face falls)
Oh... All right.
(hangs up; to Niles)
Well, Mr. Niles, after telling me a
lot of stories about a lot of things,
you apparently told me an accurate
story of where you were last night.
Four witnesses put you at the Trinidad
Club at the time Jean Dexter died.
(a gesture)
I guess you're in the clear, Mr.
Niles.

NILES
(wearily)
I told you I never lie about important
things... Any more questions?

MULVEY
I guess not.

Niles rises, starts to go, stops.

NILES
You know -- I'm not as much of a
heel as I sound. I'm trying to catch
on to a good job in industry. One of
these days I will.

MULVEY
(softly)
I wish you the best.

NILES
Good-bye, then.

MULVEY
Good luck.

Niles leaves. Door closes.

MULVEY
(continuing -- softly
to Perelli)
Keep two men on him in three shifts.

Perelli nods, leaves.

MULVEY
(to Miller)
I don't want a thing said to the
newspapers about Niles. He's not
even in this case.

Miller nods.

MULVEY
(continuing)
Spent fifty dollars last night, he
said. On that much a week I supported
a wife and raised two kids.

HALLORAN
Sure, but you were brought up on the
wrong side of the tracks.

Mulvey smiles slightly.

EXT. HOMICIDE SQUAD BUILDING - DAY

Niles exits, putting on his coat. He trudges wearily down
the street.

Two detectives come out of building, start slowly after Niles.

EXT. THE SAME STREET - DAY

Garza is standing near a hot dog and ice cream wagon that
travels the streets. He is sucking a popsicle and watching
Niles. He turns and goes the other way.

INT. MULVEY'S OFFICE - DAY

CAMERA PULLS BACK to REVEAL Mulvey, Miller, Halloran -- in
consultation. Present as a special audience is Donahue. There
is a portable blackboard in office, on which are written the
following names:

MARTHA SWENSON
NED HARVEY
RUTH YOUNG
ROBERT NILES
PHILIP HENDERSON

Miller is talking, reading from his notebook.

MILLER
The only good fingerprints we got
were of the maid and Jean Dexter...
The Baltimore police say they can't
locate anyone so far who answers
Henderson's description... The pajamas
in Dexter's apartment show nothing
under the X-ray. They're an English
import and never been washed. All
stores that carry the line are being
checked.
(looks up -- to Donahue)
That's it, Captain.

DONAHUE
(to Mulvey)
Very little to go on. This man
Niles... how's his alibi for last
night?

MULVEY
He seems in the clear. So does
everybody else we've connected with
so far.

HALLORAN
So Henderson's our only suspect...

MULVEY
How about this man?

Mulvey crosses to the blackboard, picks up chalk. Underneath
Henderson's name he writes:

JOSEPH P. MCGILLICUDDY

HALLORAN
Who's he?

DONAHUE
(smiling)
McGillicuddy is Dan's name for any
unknown party in a case.

HALLORAN
You mean two men did the murder?

MULVEY
Maybe there were five. All I know is
there was more than one.

HALLORAN
How do you know?

Mulvey looks around the room, then sits on his desk. He pats
it.

MULVEY
This is a bed... For a moment, I'm
an attractive little lady.
(smiles to Halloran)
How would you chloroform me, Mr.
Henderson?

Halloran studies the question, takes a handkerchief out of
his pocket.

HALLORAN
I guess the best way'd be if I stood
behind you.

He goes behind Mulvey and gestures how he would lock his
forearm over Mulvey's throat, and use the other hand to apply
the chloroform.

MULVEY
Correct -- that's the way one man
would do it.

He jumps down, opens drawer, brings out a pile of 8 by 10
photos, shuffles them, selects one. Meanwhile, he keeps
talking.

MULVEY
(continuing)
We just got the photographs. They
show finger marks on both arms.

He tosses a photo on desk. All crowd around it.

INSERT PHOTO

It shows chin, neck, shoulders only. Visible are some blue
marks.

MULVEY'S VOICE
(over close shot)
That means a man stood behind her
and held her arms with both hands,
while Henderson or someone else
chloroformed her. A strong man, with
thick, strong fingers.

INT. BACK TO SCENE - DAY

All look up from photo, gaze at Mulvey with excitement.

MULVEY
(continuing)
And that man was my old, old friend,
Joseph P. McGillicuddy.

A pause.

DONAHUE
You're right, Dan.

HALLORAN
Now we have to find two men.

DONAHUE
You have to find them. I'm busy on
half a dozen other cases. Good night,
gentlemen.

ALL
Good night.

Donahue leaves.

MILLER
Need me any more?

Mulvey waves him good night. Miller goes. Mulvey looks at
blackboard.

MULVEY
A heavy case...
(thinks)
Why is Niles such a liar?
(pause)
What's in his heart? Is he just a
blowhard or...?
(pause)
A heavy case...

The door opens, Miller appears, wearing hat.

MILLER
(excitedly)
Say... there's an old dame outside
says she can crack the Dexter case.

Mulvey gestures for her to be brought in. Miller steps out,
ushers in a sweet-faced old lady of sixty-five. She is dressed
in an old-fashioned manner and, in spite of the heat, wears
a feather boa around her neck. She has a folded newspaper
under her arm. She speaks with a Southern accent.

OLD LADY
Are you the officer in charge of the
bathtub murder?

MULVEY
Yes, M'am.

OLD LADY
(approaching)
This one?

She spreads the newspaper on the desk.

INSERT NEWSPAPER HEADLINES

Blonde Model Slain In Brutal Bathtub Killing

MULVEY'S VOICE
Yes, M'am.

INT. BACK TO SCENE - DAY

OLD LADY
I can help you solve it.

MULVEY
Yes?

OLD LADY
My gran'daddy is Sheriff of Tuckahue
County, Mississippi. He's...

HALLORAN
(gasping)
Your gran'daddy?

Mulvey puts his hand out and touches Halloran warningly.

OLD LADY
(explaining)
Yes... I'm only in my twenties, you
know.

MULVEY
(gently)
And very handsome you are, too.

OLD LADY
(candidly)
Yes, I know. So many men are crazy
about me, I don't know what to do.
(starts to leave)
'Bye now.
(stops -- hesitates)
Oh yes -- about the murder. I almost
forgot. We'll have to get a front
tooth from a hound dog.

MULVEY
Yes, M'am.

OLD LADY
Bury it fifty feet from the grave.
On the third day after the first
full moon, the murderer will confess.

MULVEY
Thank you, M'am.

OLD LADY
(starts off -- then
stops)
Prices are awfully high these days,
aren't they?

MULVEY
Yes, M'am.

OLD LADY
I had to decide whether to spend a
nickel on an apple for my supper --
or spend it on the subway to come up
here.

Mulvey fishes in his pocket, comes up with a dime, gives it
to her.

MULVEY
Please.

OLD LADY
You're sweet. I'll put you down in
my diary tonight. 'Bye now.

MULVEY
'Bye.

The old lady leaves. Miller gives them a look, also leaves.
Mulvey and Halloran look at each other.

HALLORAN
How much of that have you had in
thirty-eight years?

MULVEY
I couldn't count it. Every time
there's a headline case. We'll be
lucky if there isn't a lot more.

HALLORAN
'Bye now.

MULVEY
(grinning)
'Bye.

Halloran leaves. Mulvey turns to blackboard, looks at names.
He erases all the names except those of Henderson, Niles,
McGillicuddy. He stares at them.

EXT. 14TH ST. - DAY

Hurrying people are exiting from a department store.

NARRATOR
The day's work is over now...

EXT. ANOTHER STREET - DAY

Office workers are exiting from factory building at 99 Hudson
Street.

NARRATOR
...and several million people...

EXT. QUEENSBORO BRIDGE - DAY

A subway train is going over bridge.

NARRATOR
...are on their way home...

INT. SUBWAY CAR - DAY FULL SHOT PEOPLE

NARRATOR
...tired and hot...

INSERT A SITTING MAN eyes closed, face sweaty.

NARRATOR
Six A.M. tomorrow will come awfully
soon.

INSERT A SITTING GIRL young. She is staring, fascinated, at
a tabloid and biting her fingernail.

NARRATOR
Must've been a hard day behind that
counter, honey...

INSERT TABLOID There is a lurid drawing of the murder being
committed in the bathtub. Very wild.

A CAPTION OVER IT SAYS:

"Artist's Conception Of How Model Died."

NARRATOR
...but don't bite your nails. Harry
won't like it. And besides, this
isn't how the murder was really
committed.

INT. BACK TO SCENE - DAY

Halloran, hanging onto a strap, is reading a paper. Behind
him are a stout girl and a young man. The stout girl is short
and is peering at Halloran's paper from under his arm.

STOUT GIRL
Read about that bathtub murder?

YOUNG MAN
I'll say. Some figger that dame had.
I wouldna minded being the wash rag
in her bathtub. Haw! Haw!

EXT. AT A BILLBOARD - DAY

A newsboy has walked away from his stand to pencil a moustache
on the face of an actress in a movie advertisement...
Passersby on street.

NEWSBOY
(mechanically, as he
draws... in double
talk)
Evening paper... Sensational... Tibet
Report... Bathtub murder... Hitler
reported hiding in... Artist's
Model... Get your paper...

Garza comes up, takes a paper, drops a nickel, walks off. A
well-dressed man takes a paper. As he is fishing for change
he observes newsboy with back turned. He walks off quickly
without paying, a pleased smirk on his face.

EXT. HALLORAN'S HOME - DAY

as he opens door of his two-family home and enters.

HALLORAN
(calling)
Anybody home?

He throws his hat and newspaper on the couch and starts taking
off coat. The room is combination living-room, dining-room
with standard Grand Rapids furniture. The small table is set
for dinner. In answer to his call, a voice comes from the
kitchen.

JANEY'S VOICE (O.S.)
Hello, honey.

She appears at kitchen door and comes toward him. She has on
a playsuit with bare mid-riff and an apron. She is pretty in
a quiet way, has a straightforward manner. Halloran pulls
off tie and starts unbuttoning shirt.

JANEY
(continuing)
Bet it was hot in Manhattan today.

HALLORAN
I was too busy to be hot. On a new
case.
(as he takes off shirt)
The subway was a furnace, though.

JANEY
You too warm to say hello?

HALLORAN
Yup.

He puts his arms around her, kisses her.

JANEY
Got you a nice, cool supper. Jellied
tongue.

HALLORAN
(holding her)
Swell. I'm hungry. Stop holding on
to me. Let's go, I'm starved.

She laughs. He kisses her, lets her go.

HALLORAN
(continuing)
Where's Billy?

JANEY
I put him to bed. Listen, dear, I'm
sorry to tell you but you've got a
nasty job to do before supper.

Halloran takes off the hip belt on which his gun holster
hangs and puts it up on the closet shelf. Janey continues
meanwhile.

JANEY
(continuing)
Billy has to have a whipping.

HALLORAN
Why?

JANEY
He walked right out of the yard,
crossed Stillman Avenue all by himself
and went to the park.

HALLORAN
Well... I'll give him a real talking
to.

JANEY
No you won't, you'll give him a real
whipping, with a strap.

HALLORAN
Just a minute, honey...

JANEY
(interrupting)
I know -- I know -- you don't believe
in whipping a child. Neither have I
until now. But do you want Billy run
over by a truck?

Halloran is silent.

JANEY
(continuing)
I've reasoned with him, I've pleaded
with him, I've threatened him. But
the minute my back is turned, he's
off.

HALLORAN
Well... he's a spunky kid, Janey.

JANEY
I don't want him to be a dead kid.

HALLORAN
(yielding)
No...

JANEY
Go ahead then. Get it over with.

HALLORAN
Yeah, I guess I will... right after
supper.

JANEY
Jimmy --
(points)

HALLORAN
I can't just go in there and take a
strap to that boy. I've got to work
up to it a little bit.

JANEY
You'd think I was asking you to kill
him.

Phone RINGS.

HALLORAN
If you think it's so easy, you whip
him.
(goes to phone)

JANEY
Me? That's not a woman's job.

HALLORAN
(at phone)
Why does it have to be a man's job?

JANEY
It's always the man's job.

HALLORAN
(raising phone)
Who says so? ...Hello.
(listens)
Oh... sure, Dan... yeah, right away.

He hangs up, crosses to closet for gun.

HALLORAN
Got a call. I have to meet Mulvey
right away.

JANEY
Without any supper?

HALLORAN
Save it for me... I'll grab a
hamburger meanwhile.

JANEY
I wish you were an ice cream salesman
or something. I don't like this night
work and I don't like it every time
you strap on that gun.

Halloran is now putting on his shirt and tie. Janey takes
off her apron.

HALLORAN
If I were an ice cream salesman, I'd
get fat. Then you wouldn't like me.

JANEY
I don't like you now.

HALLORAN
(singing it)
Oh, yes you do.

JANEY
Remember -- you've got a job before
you leave this house.

HALLORAN
What?

JANEY
Billy.

HALLORAN
I can't stop for that now.

JANEY
(jumping up)
Halloran -- you're a coward.

HALLORAN
(kissing her)
'Bye now.

He grabs coat and starts off.

JANEY
Jimmy.

He stops. She goes up and catches his arm, kisses him.

JANEY
(continuing)
I'll wait up for you.

HALLORAN
Good deal.

He runs his finger across her bare midriff. She wiggles a
little.

JANEY
Where you going?

HALLORAN
To see a pretty girl.

He runs his finger across her midriff again. She wiggles.

JANEY
Some place exciting, huh?

HALLORAN
Yes, dear. To the morgue.

He pokes her with his finger, starts out.

DISSOLVE TO:

EXT. BUILDING MARKED: CITY MORTUARY - NIGHT

as Detective Constentino approaches with a plainly dressed,
middle-aged couple, the Batorys. The man and woman stare at
the sign for a moment and then follow Constentino inside.

INT. ANTEROOM OF MORTUARY - NIGHT

MULVEY, HALLORAN AND UNIFORMED NURSE

are seated, but rise when Constentino enters with the man
and woman. Constentino is forty-five, husky, dark, competent
appearing. Mr. Batory is fifty, thin, looking both strong
and work-worn, with a neat little grey moustache and a bald
head. Mrs. Batory is the same age, stocky, with a face and
figure that show signs of an earlier peasant beauty. Mr.
Batory looks stunned, grief-stricken, shocked beyond
understanding. Mrs. Batory seems at the point of hysteria,
her eyes red, her hands plucking at her dress, her hair, her
face.

CONSTENTINO
This is Lieutenant Mulvey.
(to Mulvey)
Mr. and Mrs. Batory, the girl's
parents.

Before Mulvey can say anything, Mrs. Batory bursts out in an
angry, injured, bitter tone.

MRS. BATORY
I told her! I knew she'd turn out no
good. All these young girls... so
crazy to be with the bright lights.
There's no bright lights for her
now, is there?
(she stops, plucks at
her dress)

MULVEY
(gently)
She's at rest now, Mrs. Batory.

MRS. BATORY
(bitterly)
No -- her kind of dead don't rest!
And how 'bout us? The scandal -- God
in Heaven! My husband's a gardener.
He works for a banker, a highly
respectable gentleman. He'll get
fired now. Oh, I hate her, I hate
her.

MR. BATORY
(miserably)
Paula...

MRS. BATORY
Never mind... I hate her. I say it
out straight. So fancy she was. Even
had to change her name. Hah!

MULVEY
(uncomfortably)
We'd better go in now. If you'll
please follow the nurse.

FOLLOW SHOT

as nurse leads the way down a short hallway and into a room.
The group follows. CAMERA is CLOSE on MRS. BATORY, who keeps
muttering as she walks.

MRS. BATORY
I do hate her, I do. I warned her. A
million times I warned her.

INT. MORTUARY - NIGHT

as group enters room. In the center is a table on which lies
a covered body, the face out of CAMERA range. The Batorys
stop dead. Mrs. Batory continues to mutter.

MRS. BATORY
I hate her. I hate her for what she
done to us.

Mulvey gestures to nurse. She walks toward body to raise
sheet from face.

MULVEY
(to Batorys)
Please tell me if she's your daughter.

CLOSE SHOT BATORYS

Mrs. Batory falls silent. An instant later we see by the
reaction on both their faces that the face of the dead girl
has been exposed. Mr. Batory seems to shrink back, become
smaller. Mrs. Batory's lips quiver.

MR. BATORY
(dully)
That's her...

Mrs. Batory stands with trembling lips. Her hand plucks at
her dress, her face. A sudden, hysterical scream bursts from
her lips.

MRS. BATORY
My baby! Oh, my baby!

She runs forward.

INT. AT THE TABLE - NIGHT

Mrs. Batory throws herself on foot of table, sobbing brokenly.
The nurse is replacing the sheet.

EXT. DEAD END STREET OVERLOOKING RIVER - NIGHT

as Mr. and Mrs. Batory come up to bench. She sits down, he
sits beside her. Behind them are Mulvey and Halloran. Mulvey
pauses near them, begins stuffing a pipe. Halloran leans
against a lamppost, smokes a cigarette. A police sedan, with
Constentino and a driver, pauses a bit down the street.

MRS. BATORY
(low-voiced)
I feel better now. The walk was good
for me.

MULVEY
Are you sure you want to go home
tonight? We can get you a hotel room.

Batory looks at his wife, then shakes his head.

MR. BATORY
We'll go home. We don't like this
place...
(bitterly)
...this fine city.

MRS. BATORY
(diffidently -- to
Mulvey)
You don't know... who done it, huh?

MULVEY
Not yet.

He fishes in his pocket, brings out the black star sapphire
ring that was on Jean Dexter's hand. He steps closer to them,
shows it.

MULVEY
(continuing)
Did you ever see this?

The Batorys look at it, shake their heads.

MULVEY
(continuing)
Your daughter told someone it came
from her brother, in India.

MR. BATORY
(confused)
We only had her -- no other kids --
no boy.

Mulvey looks at Halloran, puts ring in pocket.

MULVEY
I see... And did your daughter ever
mention a man named Henderson?

MRS. BATORY
(bitterly)
We don't know any Henderson. We
haven't seen Mary even for six months.
She was too busy to come see us. Who
knows what she ran around with?

MR. BATORY
(to his wife)
She's dead, momma, don't...
(to Mulvey,
passionately)
A good girl, I swear it! It's my
fault maybe I didn't do better for
her. When she was fifteen she was
working already, the five and ten
cent store. Oh it was hard, depression
time, hard.

MRS. BATORY
(to her husband)
So what? She's the only one didn't
have it easy? Other people had it
worse! Was that a reason to leave
home -- to change your name?
(to Mulvey)
Wanting too much, that's why she
went wrong. Bright lights and theaters
and furs and night clubs. That's why
she's dead now. Dear God, why wasn't
she born ugly?
(begins to weep quietly)
What a heartache! You nurse a child,
raise it, pet it, love it... and it
ends like this.

MULVEY
I've had my own children, Mrs. Batory.
They turned out all right, thank
goodness, but who's to know why or
how? I've seen a lot of human misery
in my work. I don't know where people
start to go wrong.

MRS. BATORY
(defensively)
We did our best. It wasn't our fault.

MULVEY
Of course it wasn't. And maybe not
even hers. When you think it over, I
guess it was everybody's fault. People
get so pounded and pounded in this
life.
(shakes his head --
softly)
It's a jungle, a city like this.
Eight million people struggling for
life, for food, for air, for a bit
of happiness. Seems like there ain't
enough of everything to go around...
and so sometimes it breaks out in...
violence.

A boat whistle blows mournfully from the river. Mulvey looks
out over the water.

MULVEY
(continuing in a murmur)
...an' we call it homicide...

FADE OUT:

FADE IN:

EXT. TALL BUILDINGS - DAY

SUNRISE STREAMING OVER THE TOWERS OF LOWER MANHATTAN

NARRATOR
Six A.M. -- Summer day -- work day.

EXT. THE SKY - DAY

A flight of birds across CAMERA.

NARRATOR
This time yesterday, Jean Dexter was
just another name in the phone book...

INT. A CAFETERIA - DAY A MAN

is reading a tabloid. Shoves toast in his mouth.

NARRATOR
...but now she's the marmalade on
ten thousand pieces of toast... all
around the town...

INT. APARTMENT DOOR - DAY

In front of door is a folded newspaper, and a bottle of coffee
cream standing on a piece of note paper. The door opens. We
hear a voice, half humming, half singing. Mulvey appears, in
trousers, slippers, no shirt, suspenders hanging. He picks
up newspaper, bottle, note.

MULVEY
East Side, West Side, all around the
town...

INT. MULVEY'S APARTMENT - DAY

Still humming, he carries things back to table. He opens
note.

INSERT: NOTE:

Dear Mr. Mulvey:

Sorry the cream was sour yesterday. About this new case you're
on -- I figure it's the janitor -- a sex crime. Do you want
any buttermilk?

Your Milkman.

INT. MULVEY - DAY

He hums, grins, pours cream in coffee.

INT. DRUGSTORE - DAY

The druggist is serving grapefruit and coffee to a man at
the counter.

DRUGGIST
So I says to that detective:
'Confidentially,' I says, 'that Dexter
girl used to come in here night after
night and pour her heart out to me --
ask my advice.' That'll be twenty-
five cents, please. And I told her
'marry and settle down, have a couple
kids,' I said! But it's too late
now.
(leans forward)
Keep it confidential, bud, willya?

INT. STONEMAN DINING ROOM - DAY

Dr. Stoneman and his wife, eating breakfast. He is dressed,
she is in negligee, a woman of fifty. Both are reading
newspapers.

MRS. STONEMAN
(suddenly)
Lawrence!!

STONEMAN
(reading)
Uh-huh?

MRS. STONEMAN
This Dexter murder case! It says she
was your patient.

STONEMAN
Not really. I only saw her once.

MRS. STONEMAN
She was beautiful, wasn't she?

STONEMAN
Quite.

MRS. STONEMAN
What was she like?

STONEMAN
Just one of those sad creatures who
want more than life can give them.
(raising coffee urn)
Coffee?

INT. EDITORIAL OFFICE OF A NEWSPAPER - DAY

Publisher, managing editor.

PUBLISHER
This Dexter case. Give it an editorial
today. 'What's the matter with the
police? What's the matter with the
Mayor?' Slam into 'em. Pin their
ears back.

MANAGING EDITOR
How about saying the whole city's in
the grip of a crime wave?

PUBLISHER
Listen -- as long as this
administration's in office, we're
suffering from a perpetual crime
wave.

MANAGING EDITOR
Check.

INT. ANOTHER NEWSPAPER OFFICE - DAY

Another managing editor, another publisher.

MANAGING EDITOR
How do you want me to handle the
Dexter case editorially?

PUBLISHER
You know our policy. Watch how the
Tabloid handles it. You do the
opposite.

MANAGING EDITOR
Check.

EXT. JEAN DEXTER'S APARTMENT HOUSE - DAY

A small crowd of people is gawking in front. A policeman
stands at door. A vendor with a peanut, ice-cream and hotdog
stand is at the curb, doing business.

RANDOM VOICES ARE HEARD:

FIRST MAN'S VOICE
Hey, Mac -- what's doin', why all
the people here?

SECOND MAN'S VOICE
(genially)
What's doin? Whatsamatter, you live
in Canarsie or somethin'? This is
the dump where that model was killed.

FIRST MAN'S VOICE
You don't mean it! The bathtub girl,
eh? So why didn't she take showers?

Both men laugh.

EXT. CITY HALL - DAY

INT. OFFICE CORRIDOR - DAY

ONE OFFICE DOOR READS:

OFFICE OF THE MAYOR

INT. MAYOR'S OFFICE - DAY

THE MAYOR
(to reporters)
That's all for this morning,
gentlemen. Any questions?

A REPORTER
Since Commissioner Wallander's here,
do you have any statement on the
Jean Dexter case?

THE MAYOR
I don't. Do you, Commissioner?

COMMISSIONER WALLANDER
(genially)
A case is a case. If it happens to
lend itself to sensationalism, that's
your good luck. But to the Homicide
Squad, it's just another job.

THE MAYOR
I'll tell you this: As Mayor of New
York I expect criticism -- not only
of me but of the Police Department.
But as an ex-cop, I know a tough
case when I see one. Not many murders
go unsolved -- but it takes more
than twenty-four hours to handle a
case like this.

COMMISSIONER WALLANDER
(to Mayor)
For that -- thanks.

THE MAYOR
Don't mention it.
(smiles)

EXT. MADISON AVE. - DAY

Niles, wearing the phony ruptured duck in the lapel of a
Panama suit, comes down the street, enters a jewelry store.

NARRATOR
The sun isn't too hot as yet. And
it's pleasant to walk along Madison
Ave...

EXT. TWO MEN ON MADISON AVE. - DAY

CAMERA IS SHOOTING ACROSS AND DOWN THE STREET

The two men are looking toward CAMERA. They step into a
doorway.

NARRATOR
...there are shady doorways to rest
in... for patient men who are not in
a hurry.

EXT. EAST SIDE ST. - DAY

A hurdy gurdy player.

SOUND: He is grinding out "After the Ball is Over."

NARRATOR
It's pleasant on an early summer
morning to listen to an old song...

A coin bounces down on side-walk, rolls. A passerby picks it
up, gives it to hurdy gurdy man -- walks off. The passerby
is Garza.

NARRATOR
...it whiles away the time.

EXT. AN EAST SIDE PIER - DAY

where several adolescent boys are stripping off their clothes
for a swim. They wear tights underneath. The first boy,
undressed, steps up to the edge of the pier, ready to dive.
Suddenly he yells out and points.

NARRATOR
...So pleasant to dive into the East
River even though sometimes the water
is littered with a city's trash: a
half-eaten apple... a chip of wood...
a lady's hat...

BOY
Look! Hey, look!

The other boys run up, look down into water.

NARRATOR
(softly)
...a chip of wood... a lady's hat...
and other things...

EXT. A MAN'S BODY IN WATER - DAY

floating face downward.

INT. OUTER OFFICE OF PRECINCT HEADQUARTERS - DAY

Perelli. He goes toward door marked 'Lieutenant Mulvey',
enters.

INT. MULVEY'S OFFICE - DAY

Mulvey, at desk, Constentino, Halloran. Mulvey is talking.

MULVEY
This is Dexter's address book. Contact
every name listed in it. Keep asking
if they heard her talk about
Henderson.

Constentino nods, takes the address book, leaves. Mulvey
nods to Perelli.

MULVEY
(to Halloran)
Start in on this ring of Dexter's.
(takes out black star
sapphire)
Canvass every expensive jewelry shop
in the city... maybe Henderson bought
it for her.

HALLORAN
(grinning)
Oh, my poor feet.

MULVEY
(smiling)
Be glad you're not a horseback cop.

Halloran leaves.

MULVEY
(to Perelli)
What's with you?

PERELLI
(takes a man's diamond-
studded cigarette
case out of his pocket)
Niles sold this about an hour ago to
a jeweler on Madison Avenue. Got six
hundred dollars for it.

MULVEY
(excited)
Well! Where's the list of stuff that
was stolen from Dexter?

He opens a desk drawer, pulls out a typewritten sheet of
paper. He examines cigarette case, looks down list.

MULVEY
(disappointed)
It isn't on here. It's a man's item
anyway.

Perelli grimaces in disappointment.

MULVEY
(slowly)
That's an interesting man, that Niles.
He operates very strange.

PERELLI
Say -- how about I check this
cigarette case with the Department
list of all jewelry stolen in the
last year or so?

MULVEY
All right... I don't think you'll
get anything, though. He'd be crazy
to pawn a stolen item in the middle
of a hot case like this.

PERELLI
Maybe he is crazy.
(rises)

MULVEY
Not that one.

Perelli leaves.

Mulvey sits thinking, stuffs a pipe.

NARRATOR
(softly)
Button, button, who's got the button?

EXT. A BEAUTY SHOP ON LEXINGTON AVENUE - DAY

Constentino stops outside, checks number.

NARRATOR
Relax, Constentino, your wife does
this, too.

He steps inside and blinks a little at the spectacle of eight
women in a row sitting under dryers. All of the women,
naturally, turn as one to stare at him. An operator walks up
to him. They talk for a moment. The operator shakes her head
several times. Constentino leaves.

NARRATOR
...How about a permanent, bud? How
about a mud-pack for your complexion?
Ever have your eyebrows plucked?
What? Don't you even get your nails
manicured? Hey, Constentino, wait!
You could get to like it here.

INT. FASHIONABLE JEWELRY SHOP - DAY

Jeweler and Halloran -- Jeweler is looking at the black star
sapphire ring.

JEWELER
No, I never saw this ring. It's an
odd one. Hard to forget.

HALLORAN
Thanks. You've been a help.

EXT. OUTSIDE JEWELRY SHOP - DAY

Halloran emerges, looks at list of stores on paper. He starts
off.

NARRATOR
How are the feet, Halloran? Would
you care for some arch supporters?
Would you be interested in knowing
that there was a confession in this
case only ten minutes ago?

EXT. FIFTY-SEVENTH STREET - DAY

A police car is racing through traffic, siren wide open.

NARRATOR
What's your hurry, Mulvey? You're
supposed to be a patient man. Why
get so excited?

INT. MEN'S HABERDASHERY SHOP ON LEXINGTON AVENUE - DAY

A detective is standing with the proprietor, who is examining
Henderson's pajamas.

NARRATOR
Calling all members of the Homicide
Squad, Officer. There was a confession
in the Dexter case at 11:50 A.M.

EXT. TOOTS SHOR'S RESTAURANT - DAY

Constentino is consulting address book. He starts in.

NARRATOR
Hey, Constentino -- why don't you
throw that address book away? This
case is all washed up -- it's finished --
got a confession --

INT. LIVING ROOM OF DEXTER'S APARTMENT - DAY

Sitting down, head in his hands, is BISBEE, a tall, gaunt
young man who speaks in a reedy voice. A policeman is opening
the door. Mulvey and Miller burst in.

POLICEMAN
(excitedly)
Here he is, Lieutenant. I caught him
trying to get in the kitchen by the
back door. He's a grocery boy in the
neighborhood.

Bisbee jumps up.

BISBEE
Yes, I did it -- I killed her. I
want to be punished. I'm guilty. My
hands are stained with her blood.

MULVEY
Why did you kill her?

BISBEE
She deserved it. For months I've
been watching her. I'd come up with
packages and there she'd be -- in
her negligee -- beautiful -- but no
soul -- immoral. So I did it. I rid
the world of her.

MULVEY
(quickly)
The knife you stabbed her with. What
did you do with it?

BISBEE
You'll never find it -- never. I
buried it -- I buried it.

MULVEY
(to Cop)
Call Bellevue Hospital... Psychiatric
Department.
(starts out)

DISSOLVE:

INT. MULVEY'S OFFICE - NIGHT

MULVEY, DONAHUE, MILLER

Miller is cleaning his fingernails with a penknife. Donahue
is looking over various reports that Mulvey is handing him
from a folder.

NARRATOR
It's seven-thirty in the evening
now. It's been a great day on the
Dexter case: Developments -- none;
new clues -- none; progress -- none.
Ever try to catch a murderer? It has
its depressing moments.

Donahue now returns the last report to Mulvey. Mulvey closes
the folder. Donahue rubs his forefinger thoughtfully up and
down the length of his nose.

DONAHUE
I can't see you've missed anything.

MULVEY
(wryly)
Boss, I can always trust you to
comfort a man.

Pause.

DONAHUE
Any word today from Baltimore?

MULVEY
No... and Henderson's pajamas were
bought last week in a store on 34th
Street -- but not by Henderson -- by
Jean Dexter.

Pause. Donahue shakes his head.

DONAHUE
A heavy case...

MULVEY
It's that.

The door opens. Perelli appears, looking very pleased. He
takes the cigarette case sold by Niles out of his pocket.

PERELLI
This cigarette case Niles sold this
morning -- it's hot. It was stolen
from Dr. Lawrence Stoneman.

DONAHUE
Dexter's physician?

PERELLI
Yeah. He reported a robbery in his
apartment in March. Twenty-eight
hundred dollars worth of stuff. None
of it has ever shown up... Here's
the Department list of stolen jewelry
for the past year.

He hands some typewritten sheets to Mulvey. Mulvey's eyes
are gleaming. The atmosphere of the office has completely
altered, from defeat to excitement.

PERELLI
(continuing)
That's not all -- Niles bought a
plane ticket for Mexico City -- one
way.

MULVEY
Leaving when?

PERELLI
Tomorrow noon... Want me to pick him
up?

MULVEY
No. What else did he do today?

PERELLI
...Had lunch with Ruth Young. They
held hands for an hour. She went
back to her shop -- he went to the
Park Central and had a swim. He's at
Toots Shor's now.

DONAHUE
(amused)
Buying a plane ticket -- pawning a
stolen cigarette case -- that's not
smart. What is this man -- an amachoor
or something?

MULVEY
(slaps the palm of
his hand on the table)
That's what's in his heart! Now I
know! He's had no experience at being
a crook. He's a scared college boy
way out in deep water. He's starting
to thrash around now, he's in a panic.

DONAHUE
A panic over what?

MULVEY
I don't know, yet, Sam.

DONAHUE
(excitedly)
And how does this Stoneman figure?
Why should Niles pawn a cigarette
case belonging to him?

Door opens suddenly. Halloran strides in, excited.

HALLORAN
Dan -- I got something, maybe.

MULVEY
About what?

HALLORAN
The black star sapphire Dexter was
wearing when she was killed -- it
didn't belong to her. She didn't buy
it, Henderson didn't buy it for her.
It belongs to a Mrs. Hylton, 482
Park Ave. I found a jeweler who
repaired it for her.

Excitedly Mulvey picks up the Department list of stolen
jewelry. Perelli looks over his shoulder. Mulvey turns a
page, then another.

DONAHUE
(muttering)
We started in a murder case and we're
up to our necks in stolen jewelry.

PERELLI
(suddenly... pointing)
Mrs. Edgar Hylton -- there it is.

MULVEY
(excitedly)
Black star sapphire -- part of a
sixty-two-hundred-dollar robbery of
her apartment.
(to Halloran)
Did you see this Mrs. Hylton?

HALLORAN
I thought you might want to see her.

MULVEY
Now that was considerate of you,
Jimmy. We'll telephone the lady and
we'll both go to see her.

He turns to Donahue with gleaming eyes.

MULVEY
Have a beer on me, Sam. An' throw a
pinch of salt over your shoulder.
This case is starting to move.

EXT. IN FRONT OF 482 PARK AVENUE - NIGHT

NARRATOR
Ever watch a hound dog tracking A
police sedan stops at the curb. Mulvey
and Halloran get out, walk toward
entrance. down a rabbit? It sniffs --
and sniffs -- and suddenly it begins
to run...

INT. APARTMENT HOUSE CORRIDOR - NIGHT

Mulvey and Halloran are entering an apartment. A maid has
opened the door.

INT. FOYER OF HYLTON APARTMENT - NIGHT

A rhumba record is being played in an adjacent room.

MAID
Mrs. Hylton's waiting for you.

She leads the way to a sitting room, separated from the foyer
by heavy brocade curtains.

INT. SITTING ROOM - NIGHT

as they enter. Rhumba music is coming over the radio. MRS.
HYLTON is sitting by the radio, her head cocked to one side,
listening to the music with obvious delight. She gestures
for them to come in but continues to listen to the music,
which is approaching the end of a tune. One foot is tapping
out the rhythm. Mulvey and Halloran exchange amused glances,
wait. The music ends, Mrs. Hylton switches off the radio,
then jumps up and comes toward them, beaming.

She is a woman in her late forties, no more than five feet
tall, very slim, bright-eyed. Her speech, her gestures, her
walk, are all very quick, vigorous; she is as close to being
a hummingbird as any woman can be. She is dressed in an
attractive, expensive house-coat and is wearing diamond rings
on both hands, a diamond bracelet, a diamond clip in her
grey hair.

MAID
Lieutenant Mulvey, M'am.
(she leaves)

MRS. HYLTON
(gayly)
As you see, I'm crazy about rhumba
music. Imagine, at my age!
(to Halloran)
My, what a nice-looking young man!
(to Mulvey)
You're the Lieutenant who telephoned
me, aren't you? Did you get my jewels
back?

Mulvey produces the black star sapphire.

MULVEY
Is this one of 'em?

MRS. HYLTON
(with a shriek of
delight)
Yes it is! Oh, wonderful, you
wonderful men. Where's the rest?

MULVEY
This is all we have.

MRS. HYLTON
I'm so disappointed! But this is
wonderful. I gave it to my daughter
when she graduated from college. She
was heart-broken when --
(stops talking...
holds ring up to
light)
Isn't it precious?
(laughs... holds out
hands)
I love to glitter. It's a fixation.
(to Halloran)
My, you're nice looking.
(gesturing)
Sit down, gentlemen, get comfortable.

Mulvey and Halloran sit. Both of them look a bit bewildered.

MULVEY
Mrs. Hylton -- is your daughter here?
I'd like to talk to her.

MRS. HYLTON
(looking at wrist
watch)
She's due any minute for dinner --
it's her night with Momma.
(laughs)
One of those career girls -- has her
own apartment -- works. That's what
you get when you send them to Vassar.
(laughs)

MULVEY
If she doesn't live with you, how is
it her ring was stolen from here?

MRS. HYLTON
That was last December. She was living
with me then.

MULVEY
I see... Now... ah... I wonder if by
any chance...

GIRL'S VOICE
Mother? I'm here.

Ruth Young appears in the doorway. Halloran bounds to his
feet.

HALLORAN
Niles -- he's the connection!

MULVEY
Easy, lad.
(crossing to Ruth)
You told me your name was Ruth Young --
not Hylton.

MRS. HYLTON
Ruth's my daughter by a first
marriage. She kept her father's name.
(to Ruth)
How do you know these men?

RUTH
They're investigating Jean Dexter's
murder. Jean modeled with me at the
shop, Mother.

MRS. HYLTON
Imagine!
(suddenly)
Look, darling.
(displays sapphire)

RUTH
My ring!

MRS. HYLTON
They brought it. Aren't they
wonderful?

RUTH
How did you get it?

MULVEY
Your friend was wearing it when she
was murdered.

RUTH
(bewildered)
Jean?

MRS. HYLTON
How did she get it?

MULVEY
I was hoping your daughter would
tell us that.

RUTH
I have no idea. It was stolen with
the other things.
(suddenly, to Halloran)
What did you mean before when you
said, 'Niles -- he's the connection?'

Halloran shifts awkwardly, says nothing.

RUTH
(continuing)
What did you mean? Please...

MULVEY
He was just wondering, Miss... how
your ring came to be on her finger.

RUTH
You don't think Robert...?
(laughs)
But that's silly. He hardly knew
Jean.

MULVEY
That ring on your hand now... is it
your engagement ring?

RUTH
Yes.

MULVEY
Might I see it?

Ruth takes it off, gives it to him.

MULVEY
(continuing)
A pearl in an old-fashioned setting.
Unusual.

Mulvey gives ring and a list from his pocket to Halloran.

MULVEY
(continuing)
Jimmy --

Halloran nods, moves off a little, sits.

RUTH
(composed)
What are you doing?

MULVEY
(gently)
I'm sorry, Miss. We're checking your
ring to see if it was stolen.

RUTH
(trying to be nice
about it)
You don't mind if I feel rather
insulted, do you?

MULVEY
(gently)
I'd expect you to.

MRS. HYLTON
I'm sure you have to question everyone
who knew Miss Dexter -- but this is
fantastic.

RUTH
Do you honestly think either Robert
or I had anything to do with her
murder?

MULVEY
Just earning my salary, Miss.

Halloran suddenly steps up to Ruth.

HALLORAN
When did Niles give you this ring?

RUTH
About six weeks ago.

HALLORAN
On January 8th, Mrs. Charles Franklyn,
382 Fern Ave., New Rochelle, reported
the loss of this ring in a robbery.

Ruth is stricken. She stares at him in horror. Mrs. Hylton
looks stunned.

A pause.

RUTH
(rising... anguished)
Mother, if you don't mind, I won't
have supper with you tonight.

MRS. HYLTON
Of course, dear.
(vaguely, to Mulvey)
Robert, a thief? But he's so educated.
He studied philosophy in college...

Mulvey, however, is paying no attention to Mrs. Hylton. He
calls sharply to Ruth Young, who has started out of the room.

MULVEY
Miss Young.

She pauses.

MULVEY
(continuing)
Where are you going?

RUTH
(in a whisper)
Whatever you're thinking, I know the
sort of man Robert is. There's some
explanation of this, and he'll give
it to me.

MULVEY
Okay -- but we'll have to go with
you.

RUTH
Oh!
(pause)
That's quite all right... Good-bye,
Mother. I'll call you.

Her mother is too stricken to reply.

MULVEY
(on way out)
Good night, M'am.

Mrs. Hylton stands, looking very distracted. The others leave.
Her hand goes to her face, plucks at her lip.

MRS. HYLTON
(to herself)
Upsetting... everything's always so
upsetting.

Maid appears at entrance.

MAID
Isn't Miss Ruth staying to supper?

MRS. HYLTON
No... no, she isn't... I'll eat
alone...
(starts out, pauses)
Put on some music, Margaret... a
rhumba.

EXT. A STREET IN EAST EIGHTIES - NIGHT

A taxi comes slowly down the street, stops. Mulvey steps
out, looks around. A figure comes out of the shadow of a
building, joins him. It is Perelli.

EXT. MULVEY, PERELLI - NIGHT

In BG in taxi, are Ruth Young and Halloran. Ruth is twisting
a handkerchief in her hands.

MULVEY
(low-voiced)
Is Niles in?

PERELLI
Went in about half an hour ago.

MULVEY
Alone?

PERELLI
Yeah.

Reaches in pocket, hands him a key.

PERELLI
(continuing)
Apartment 7 E. Building on the corner.

MULVEY
You can go home now.

PERELLI
Thanks... I'm dead. S'long.

MULVEY
Good night.

Perelli leaves. Mulvey beckons to Halloran. He and Ruth get
out of the car as Mulvey pays hackie. They start across the
street, on the diagonal, toward the corner apartment house.

INT. APARTMENT HOUSE CORRIDOR - NIGHT

Mulvey, Halloran, Ruth stop at a door. A spill of light
underneath. Halloran rings the bell. They wait. He rings the
bell again. They wait.

MULVEY
(calling)
Niles!

There is no reply. Mulvey takes the key out of his pocket.
Halloran takes out his gun.

MULVEY
(sharply, to Ruth)
Stand back.

He pushes her to one side. He opens door, flings it back and
lets Halloran rush in.

INT. NILES APARTMENT - NIGHT

as Halloran, Mulvey, with Ruth following, burst in. Niles is
on the floor, unconscious. A chair is overturned, the contents
of a suitcase are strewn all over a divan.

MULVEY
The window!

Halloran races across the room to an open window, climbs
out.

EXT. FIRE ESCAPE - NIGHT

as Halloran jumps out, looks down. Four stories below he
sees a shadowy, bulky figure, racing down. The sound of
pounding feet on the iron grid work comes up. Halloran snaps
up his gun, leans out, shoots. There is an instant metallic
ping as the bullet hits the fire escape somewhere down below,
then ricochets with a shattering of glass through a window
in the house. Halloran starts to run down as a yell comes
from below. Above the pounding of Halloran's feet we hear an
angry man's voice.

MAN'S VOICE
What's going on here?

EXT. HALLORAN'S FACE - NIGHT

tense, breaking out with sweat, as he runs. We hear him
panting for breath.

A light switches on in a window as he runs past it. A window
bangs up.

A WOMAN'S VOICE
(screaming)
Police -- somebody call the police.
(she repeats it several
times)

EXT. FIRE ESCAPE - NIGHT

We see the two running figures from the sidewalk below.
Halloran is now at the fifth floor; the man escaping is just
at the edge of the ladder which forms the last section of
fire escape. He swings down onto it; it slides down to the
ground.

EXT. GARZA - NIGHT

face bathed in sweat, eyes gleaming, chest heaving. He fires
twice at Halloran; the bullets slam into the grid work,
ricochet. Garza starts to run out of the alley.

EXT. GARZA - NIGHT

from Halloran's POV. Halloran stops running, leans out,
shoots. Garza keeps running, disappears into alley. Halloran
runs again.

EXT. HALLORAN - NIGHT

Seen from below. Lights are going on all over the house.
There is a babble of talk and shouts. Halloran comes to the
last section. He swings with it to the pavement. He runs
down the alley out into the deserted street. As he looks
down one way a voice yells to him. It is from a man in pajamas
in the window of a house opposite.

MAN
(yelling)
What's going on there? What's the
matter?

HALLORAN
(yelling)
Police! Did you see a man run out of
here?

MAN
That way! Around the corner!

Halloran runs around the corner. At the opposite corner is a
subway entrance. He pounds down the street, runs down the
subway steps.

INT. SUBWAY PLATFORM (SHOOTING UP) - NIGHT

as Halloran leaps down the last few stairs, gun in hand.
CAMERA PANS WITH HIM as he vaults over the turnstiles. A
train is pulling out of the station. The platform is deserted
except for two elderly women coming out of the exit. They
cling together, stare at Halloran in horror as he hurries
through turnstile over to an elderly station attendant who
has not moved out of his booth.

HALLORAN
(excitedly)
Police emergency! Is there any way
of stopping that train at the next
station -- keeping the doors locked?

ATTENDANT
The train that just pulled out?
(Halloran nods)
Well, yes, I -- I guess there is.
(eager to help, but
very ineffectual)
Let's see now. I'd have to call the
main office first...
(reaches for phone)
...or maybe I better call the 86th
Street station. Which do you think?

HALLORAN
(wearily)
Never mind. Thanks just the same.
(puts away his gun;
starts out)

INT. NILES APARTMENT - NIGHT

Niles is still on the floor, but there is a pillow under his
head and his collar and tie have been opened. Ruth, on her
knees, is bathing his face with a wet towel. A basin of water
stands nearby. Mulvey is just crossing to the window as we
hear shouts from the outside.

A WOMAN'S VOICE
Isn't anybody going to call the
police?

A MAN'S VOICE
What for? Somebody found somebody
else in the wrong apartment, that's
all.
(laughs)

MULVEY
(shouting out window)
Listen to me, everybody -- this is
Lieutenant Mulvey of the Police
Department talking. The trouble's
all over. Get quiet now and go back
to sleep.

He shuts window, returns to Ruth and Niles.

RUTH
(muttering)
Darling, darling... Robert, Robert.
(to Mulvey)
Maybe some whiskey would help.

MULVEY
(calmly)
Whiskey's not the thing to mix with
chloroform. Suppose you go into the
kitchen and see if there's a spot of
coffee on the stove. It'll do fine,
even if it's cold.

Ruth jumps up, runs out. Mulvey bends down, raises Niles's
head with one hand. He proceeds to slap him smartly on both
sides of the face.

MULVEY
(muttering)
Come on now, my sleepin' beauty...
wake up.
(slapping him)
That's the sweet lad.
(slaps him)

Niles groans, his eyelids flutter, his head turns. Mulvey
slaps him again, then reaches for the basin of water. He
pours the water over Niles's face. Niles's eyes open in a
bewildered stare. Ruth comes into room carrying a cup.

RUTH
I found some cold tea.

MULVEY
That'll do fine. He's waking up now.

She runs to Niles, kneels.

RUTH
Robert, darling.

NILES
(still dazed)
Hello, Ruth.

She kisses him, holds, him, cradles him, kisses him again.

MULVEY
(muttering)
A touching scene.
(to Ruth)
The cold tea'll do him more good.

The door opens, Halloran comes in. Mulvey joins him. They
whisper. Halloran's face is wet with sweat.

HALLORAN
He got away. On the subway, I think.

MULVEY
Get a look at him?

HALLORAN
No. He was a big man -- that's all I
got. What do I smell in here?

MULVEY
Chloroform. I think this is our friend
McGillicuddy again.

HALLORAN
Oh!

They both move into room. Niles is sitting up now, drinking
the tea with Ruth's help.

MULVEY
You awake?

Niles nods. He starts to get up, groans.

NILES
I've got a head like a beehive.

He feels the back of his head over one ear, winces. Halloran
takes him under both arms from behind, lifts him. On wobbly
knees Niles makes a chair, sinks down into it.

NILES
(continuing)
Is that towel wet?

RUTH
(giving it to him)
Want any more tea, darling?

NILES
No.

He looks at Mulvey, rubs his face with the towel.

MULVEY
While you're thinking up a nice story
about what didn't happen -- suppose
you tell us what did?

NILES
(slowly)
I don't know.
(rubs his face with
towel)

MULVEY
(sarcastically)
Complete blackout, eh?

NILES
I was packing a bag and... I thought
I heard a noise. Just as I started
to turn I got hit --
(indicates back of
head)
...I remember falling to my knees --
and... that's all.
(rubs face with towel)

MULVEY
Listen, Niles -- you came very close
to not waking up at all. The party
that killed Jean Dexter tried the
same business on you. Who was it?

NILES
(resentfully)
How on earth would I know?

MULVEY
If you're afraid, I'll guarantee you
police protection.

NILES
If I knew, I'd tell you. I'm not a
fool. Do you think I enjoyed this?
(rubs face)

MULVEY
Got any guess who it was?

NILES
It must've been a burglar. Came in
by the fire escape, I suppose.

MULVEY
A burglar? Maybe he stole something.

Niles stiffens. He gets up as quickly as his condition
permits, goes to divan, searches anxiously through the
suitcase and among the things strewn about. It is clear that
he is searching for something he can't find. Then he stops,
turns.

MULVEY
He got it -- didn't he?

NILES
No... no... there's nothing missing.
(quickly)
I don't have any valuables.

MULVEY
What were you just looking for so
hard -- your B.V.D.'s.?

NILES
I thought... I forgot this was in my
pocket.

He takes out a jewel-studded cigarette lighter.

NILES
(continuing)
It's my one valuable -- I only got
it two weeks ago -- it's expensive.

MULVEY
Jimmy --

Halloran takes it from Niles, pulls Department list of stolen
jewelry out of his pocket. Ruth watches with terrified
apprehension. Niles seems bewildered.

NILES
What are you doing?

Silence. Halloran is busy with the list.

NILES
(continuing)
Why'd you come down here anyway?

Silence.

NILES
(continuing excitedly)
You want to know something,
Lieutenant? You're going to have a
lawsuit on your hands. You can --

HALLORAN
(interrupting)
Forrest C. Broughton, 85 West 68th
Street, reported the loss of this
cigarette lighter three weeks ago.
Night robbery.

Silence. All look at Niles. Ruth's face is sick.

NILES
What kind of a deal is this?

MULVEY
You tell us.

NILES
If you think I'm a thief, you're
crazy.
(to Ruth)
Honey, this is the craziest thing I
ever heard of.

RUTH
(tortured at asking)
Sweetheart -- this is a terrible
thing to ask you right now, but...
my engagement ring -- where'd you
buy it?

NILES
(stunned)
What?

RUTH
Robert, darling -- please -- where'd
you buy it?

NILES
It was from a private party.

RUTH
(relieved)
Who, Robert?

NILES
I can't tell you.

RUTH
Please, sweetheart, you must. Don't
you understand? --

MULVEY
(sharply; interrupting)
Where'd you get the cigarette case
you sold this morning?

ROBERT
(pressed to wall)
What?

MULVEY
How'd you get this cigarette lighter?

Silence.

RUTH
(hysterically)
Robert -- tell them -- please, tell
them.

MULVEY
Why'd you buy a plane ticket for
Mexico City?

NILES
(stunned)
Why, I --

RUTH
What ticket? When?

MULVEY
He was supposed to leave tomorrow
noon.

RUTH
Is that true?

Silence.

RUTH
Robert -- is it true?

NILES
A business trip --

RUTH
We had lunch today. Why didn't you...?

NILES
(interrupting)
Something came up this afternoon.

MULVEY
You're lying -- you bought the ticket
in the morning.

Niles suddenly straightens, looks at Mulvey coolly.

NILES
You've got the wrong man if you think
I stole those things. I wouldn't
steal a piece of bread if I was
starving. That isn't how I was brought
up. I come from a decent family.

MULVEY
Congratulations.

NILES
I got this lighter as a present. You
can't send me to prison for that.

MULVEY
Who gave it to you?

NILES
(with quiet triumph)
Jean Dexter. Now you prove she didn't.

MULVEY
And the cigarette case you sold this
morning?

NILES
The same.

RUTH
And my engagement ring?

NILES
Sure -- Jean gave me that too.

RUTH
My engagement ring?

NILES
You heard me.

RUTH
(approaching him)
No, no, darling, don't say a thing
like that. That would be horrible.
And I know it's a lie. You hardly
knew Jean --

NILES
(coolly)
I'm sorry, Ruth.

RUTH
I don't believe you. Robert, I love
you. I'll marry you now -- tonight.
But say you're lying about Jean. If
you're a thief, I'll stand by you,
I'll --

NILES
(hysterically)
And go to prison? In a pig's eye I
will. Those things were presents --
presents -- your ring was a present --
from Jean --

RUTH
Robert --

He is silent.

RUTH
You're lying.
(hits him hard)
You're lying.
(hits him)
You're lying.
(hits him)

Sobbing hysterically, Ruth continues to hit him. Niles backs
off, raising his hands against her blows. Halloran catches
hold of Ruth, restrains her. She breaks down in sobs.

MULVEY
Niles -- you're under arrest.

NILES
(hysterically)
Arrest me all you like. But try to
prove something against me -- try it --
just try it.

DISSOLVE TO:

EXT. THE STREET IN FRONT OF THE POLICE STATION - DAY

Girls are jumping rope. Two girls swing the rope, a third
jumps. One of the girls recites in a loud voice.

GIRL
Mother, Mother, I am ill; Call the
doctor over the hill;

EXT. MULVEY - DAY

looking down from third story window with a smile.

GIRL'S VOICE
In came the doctor, in came the nurse,
In came the lady with the alligator
purse --

EXT. CHILDREN - DAY

FROM MULVEY'S POV

GIRL
I don't want the doctor, I don't
want the nurse. I don't want the
lady with the alligator purse.

HALLORAN'S VOICE
Dan...

INT. MULVEY'S OFFICE - DAY

Mulvey turns.

HALLORAN
(hesitantly)
I'm not sure but I think maybe I've
found a connection between these
jewel robberies and the Dexter murder.

MULVEY
(with interest)
Oh?
(shuts window)

GIRL'S VOICE
(from outside -- not
clear)
Out went the doctor, Out went the
nurse, Out went the lady with the
alligator purse.

HALLORAN
Have you read this autopsy report on
Peter Backalis?
(indicates paper)

MULVEY
Not yet.

HALLORAN
Yesterday morning some kids swimming
in the East River found a body.
Medical examiner says he died of
drowning -- had a head injury and
was full of whiskey. His verdict is
accidental death.

MULVEY
Well?...

HALLORAN
But look at this: Jean Dexter died
between one and two A.M. Monday
morning. This guy Backalis died
between three and six A.M. the same
morning.

MULVEY
Show me that it's more than a
coincidence.

HALLORAN
I can't show you, Dan... but the man
had a record. He served two years in
Sing Sing for stealing jewelry.

MULVEY
(smiling)
Now look -- Niles and Dexter were
dealing in stolen jewelry, sure. But
it was society stuff. What does
Backalis's record show?

HALLORAN
(chagrined)
I didn't think of that. It was small
time -- a pawn shop robbery in Queens.

MULVEY
Y'see? I'm afraid these two cases
are miles apart. If we drag every
petty jewelry thief into this, we'll
go crazy.
(looks at him)
But you're not convinced, are you?

HALLORAN
I don't know, Dan. Trouble is, where
are we on the Dexter case?

MULVEY
This morning I sent out photos of
Niles and Dexter to every Police
Department on the East Coast. They'll
check all jewelers.

HALLORAN
Where can that lead?

MULVEY
That's how you run a case, lad...
from step to step.

HALLORAN
Do me a favor, Dan. Let me waste
some time on this Backalis angle.

A pause. Mulvey thinks it over.

MULVEY
Okay, lad. Phone in once a day.

HALLORAN
Thanks.

MULVEY
By the way...

Halloran pauses.

MULVEY
(softly)
This is only the third day now on
the Dexter murder. The Department
never calls a case unsolved in less
than twenty years. Don't get
impatient.

HALLORAN
Good deal. Twenty years from now,
I'll put my kid on it.

He leaves, smiling. Mulvey grins.

EXT. POLICE HEADQUARTERS CENTRE STREET - DAY

People going in and out.

NARRATOR
Button, button, who's got the button?

INT. A FILE ROOM - DAY

Halloran waits while a clerk looks in a file. Clerk takes
out a card.

CLERK
Backalis's parole officer was Charles
Freed. County Courthouse in the Bronx.

Halloran turns, starts out.

EXT. BRONX COUNTY COURTHOUSE - DAY

as Halloran enters.

INT. AN OFFICE BRONX COUNTY COURTHOUSE - DAY

Halloran is sitting with a parole officer, CHARLES FREED, a
man of fifty, bald.

HALLORAN
Well, tell me this, Mr. Freed... Do
you think Backalis could get so drunk
he'd fall down on a pier, hurt himself
and topple into the river?

FREED
(thinking)
I doubt it. He seemed like one of
those steady, all-day drinkers --
always with a load on, but never
wobbly.

HALLORAN
Who was the arresting officer?

FREED
Patrolman Albert Hicks -- Queensboro
Precinct Station, Long Island City.

HALLORAN
Right on my doorstep! What do you
know...

EXT. BRIDGE ABOVE LONG ISLAND CITY RAILROAD YARDS - NIGHT

EXT. HALLORAN AND HICKS - NIGHT

a Negro patrolman.

HALLORAN
About two and a half years ago you
arrested Peter Backalis on a pawnshop
entry.

HICKS
That's right.

HALLORAN
Did he do that job alone?

HICKS
No -- there was another guy with him --
a feller he called Willie.

HALLORAN
What happened to him?

HICKS
He got away by the neatest trick
I've ever seen. I nailed Backalis in
the back alley. He yelled "Beat it,
Willie," and this other customer
throws a chair through a plate glass
window -- dives right after it --
and comes up on his feet like an
acrobat. Then he's off like a streak.

HALLORAN
How was this fellow built?

HICKS
Big -- like an all-American
fullback... And listen... something
funny about him. One of the things
the owner reported missing was a
harmonica. Now there's no resale
value in a thing like that. So I
always figured he must've liked to
play one.

HALLORAN
Maybe you're right. Much obliged.

INT. MULVEY'S BEDROOM - NIGHT

Mulvey is on telephone. Light is on. A newspaper on bed
indicates he's been reading.

MULVEY
(thoughtfully)
A big man who's an acrobat, eh?
(listens)
Jimmy, I don't know where you're
going -- but I'm gonna start in and
help you. I'm giving you Fowler and
Constentino, starting tomorrow
morning.
(listens)
Right.

INT. HALLORAN LIVING ROOM - NIGHT

HALLORAN
(at phone)
'Bye, Dan.

Hangs up, yawns. Starts taking off coat.

EXT. TIMES SQUARE - DAY

Halloran, Constentino, Fowler are talking. The three men
separate, go in different directions.

NARRATOR
His name is Willie -- maybe. He
might've been a professional acrobat --
maybe. He might be the man we're
looking for... maybe. Oh, yes --
he's a big man. Only half a million
big men in New York.

INT. OFFICE - DAY

A bald, thin, acidulous-looking man is talking to Halloran.
On wall, autographed photos from vaudeville actors.

BOOKING AGENT
...Not that I can remember. I been
booking vaudeville acts, circus acts,
night club acts, for thirty years.
Lot of queer eggs among 'em -- but a
acrobat who played the harmonica?
That queer I never saw one.

HALLORAN
(disappointed)
Okay... thanks.

INT. STILLMAN'S GYMNASIUM - DAY

Men are working out in ring. Off to one side Fowler talks to
Stillman.

STILLMAN
A harmonica player? No, sir, brother.
A character like that I wouldn't
even let work out here.

DISSOLVE TO:

INT. A GYMNASIUM WHERE WRESTLERS PRACTICE - DAY

Two wrestlers are intertwined on a mat; both are heavyweights.
A trainer and another wrestler are watching. Constentino
comes in.

CONSTENTINO
Who runs this joint?

TRAINER
I do. What do you want?

CONSTENTINO
(showing badge)
Police.

Instantly the two wrestlers freeze in an intertwined position,
look up.

CONSTENTINO
Any of you guys ever know a wrestler
who liked to play the harmonica?

TRAINER
Sure -- Willie the harmonica player --
Willie Garza -- I teached him to
wrastle.

One of the wrestlers on mat looks up.

WRESTLER
You didn't teach him so good. I
kokalized him in Scranton five years
ago.

CONSTENTINO
Where's he now?

TRAINER
Don't know -- don't care. He borrowed
thirty-eight bucks from me once,
never paid it back. A lousola.

CONSTENTINO
Where'd he used to live?

TRAINER
Don't know.

WRESTLER
In Staten Island -- with his brother.

CONSTENTINO
What's his brother's name?

WRESTLER
Garza. All brothers got the same
names.

CONSTENTINO
I mean his first name.

WRESTLER
I dunno.

CONSTENTINO
Okay.
(leaves)

DISSOLVE TO:

EXT. TOP FLOOR OF A BUILDING UNDER CONSTRUCTION - DAY

Halloran, Constentino and a foreman are walking up to a welder
at work.

FOREMAN
Hey, Garza -- Eddie --

Garza turns.

FOREMAN
These guys are police -- want to
talk to you.

EDDIE GARZA
(apprehensive)
Something happen to my wife?

HALLORAN
Oh, no. We just saw her. That's how
we found out where you work.

EDDIE GARZA
What is it?

HALLORAN
We're looking for your brother --
Willie.

EDDIE GARZA
Me an' my brother Willie ain't got
nothing to do with each other. He's
no good.

CONSTENTINO
When'd you see him last?

EDDIE GARZA
Three months ago about.
(laughs)
Tried to sell me a diamond ring for
my wife. I told him to go blow.

HALLORAN
Any idea at all where he lives?

EDDIE GARZA
He had a room somewhere around the
Williamsburg Bridge. That's all I
know.

CONSTENTINO
You got a picture of him?

EDDIE GARZA
No. But when he was wrestlin' the
newspapers printed his mug a few
times.

HALLORAN
Okay.

They start off.

EDDIE GARZA
If you send him up, do me a favor...
throw the keys away.

EXT. EAST SIDE TENEMENTS OVERSHADOWED BY THE WILLIAMSBURG
BRIDGE - NIGHT

INT. CAFETERIA - NIGHT

Halloran, Fowler, and Constentino at a table. They have
finished eating and each is studying a sectional map of the
district.

HALLORAN
The first guy to get a lead report
to Mulvey.

The others nod. Halloran gives them each a photo of Garza, a
wrestling pose, full-length.

EXT. A STREET CORNER - NIGHT

Fowler goes up to an old woman pretzel seller. He shows her
the photo.

NARRATOR
Lady -- did you ever see a man looked
like this?

Woman shakes her head.

EXT. A CHEAP MOVIE THEATER - NIGHT

Constentino is showing photo to ticket taker. He shakes head.

NARRATOR
Hey, buddy, ever see a man looked
like this?

INT. A CHEAP BAR - NIGHT

Halloran is showing photo to a bartender.

NARRATOR
How's your memory for faces, Mac?

INT. PRECINCT HEADQUARTERS - NIGHT

A large squad of patrolmen is lined up, ready to go out on
its beat. Fowler is showing them the photo.

NARRATOR
Here's a chance to get a promotion,
men. Just spot this guy out of half
a million people.

EXT. TENEMENTS, WILLIAMSBURG BRIDGE - DAY

NARRATOR
Another day...

EXT. EAST SIDE STREET - NIGHT

Constentino comes up to pushcart peddler, shows him photo.

NARRATOR
...work day...

INT. TAILOR SHOP - DAY

as Fowler shows photo to a worker at a steaming pressing
machine.

NARRATOR
...hot summer day...

INT. DRUG STORE PHONE BOOTH - DAY

Halloran has the receiver to his ear, is waiting. While he
waits, he blocks out a street on his sectional map. A whole
series of streets have already been blocked out. He looks
tired, drawn.

HALLORAN
(into phone)
Hello, Dan... Jimmy.
(voice is tired)
No... nothing so far.
(listens)
Sure, I'll keep going. What's doing
at your end?

INT. MULVEY'S OFFICE - DAY

In the office are Mulvey, Niles, Miller, Perelli.

MULVEY
(into phone)
Doing fine here. I'm talking to that
clean-cut young American beauty again.
(listens)
I think he's going to tell us
something this morning.
(Niles fidgets)
Okay -- report in.
(hangs up)

NILES
I've told you everything I know.

MULVEY
(pleasantly)
No, you haven't, sonny.
(rises, starts for
door)
But you will.

Mulvey opens door.

MULVEY
(continuing)
Come in, Mr. McCormick.

Niles jumps to his feet as a stout, middle-aged man enters.

MULVEY
(continuing -- to
McCormick)
Recognize this man?

MCCORMICK
I certainly do.

With surprising agility, McCormick lunges at Niles and punches
him in the jaw. Niles crumples under the weight of the blow
and sags to the floor. Perelli grabs McCormick.

MULVEY
Sit down. If there's any more of
that, you'll get yourself in trouble.
(to Niles)
Getting quite a slapping around these
days, aren't you?

McCormick sits. Niles has gotten up. He holds a handkerchief
to his mouth.

MCCORMICK
I came all the way down from Boston
to do that. That smooth-talking crook
came to me with an introduction I
had to honor. He gave me a song and
dance -- his sister was terribly
sick -- needed an operation -- he
was trying to sell her jewels. I
paid him over three thousand dollars.
Now it turns out to be stolen
property.

NILES
Are you paying him to say that,
Mulvey? You still can't prove
anything.

MCCORMICK
I can.
(pulls a letter from
his pocket)
I run my business with great care.
This is the letter of introduction
he brought with him.

Niles stiffens. Mulvey takes the letter, looks at it.

MULVEY
Dr. Lawrence Stoneman!

MCCORMICK
He treated my mother some years ago.
I had to honor his letter.

Mulvey's eyes are now riveted on Niles.

MULVEY
Will you wait outside, Mr. McCormick?

McCormick goes out. Perelli shuts door. Silence. Mulvey,
Perelli and Miller are all staring at Niles.

MULVEY
How do you get a letter of
introduction from a man like Stoneman?
(silence)
You're going to the penitentiary,
Niles.
(pause)
But from now on in, the length of
your sentence depends on you.
(pause)
Stealing jewelry is one thing -- but
murder is different.

NILES
(stubbornly)
You know I didn't kill her! I was at
the Trinidad Club. There are
witnesses.

MULVEY
Then who did kill her?

NILES
I don't know.

MULVEY
Who's Henderson?

NILES
I don't know.

MULVEY
Listen, young fellow... you'll get
five years for stealing jewelry. But
you'll get another ten years for
obstructing justice... and ten years
more for being an accessory after
the fact. Now that's the way it is,
sonny boy... and you know I'm not
bluffing.
(jumping up)
Who's Henderson? Who's Henderson?

NILES
Stoneman... He's Dr. Stoneman.

Mulvey looks at the others in triumph.

EXT. EAST SIDE STREET - DAY

A street sign: RIVINGTON STREET CAMERA MOVES DOWN to take in
Halloran, looking at sign. He crosses a bit wearily to a
corner soda fountain that opens onto the street. He leans on
counter, blocks off another street on his sectional map. The
proprietress moves over, a middle-aged woman, stout, workworn,
wearing glasses.

HALLORAN
You got any cold root beer?

PROPRIETRESS
Like ice.

As woman fills order, Halloran holds out a photo of Garza.

HALLORAN
Ever see this man?

The proprietress takes the photo, looks at it.

PROPRIETRESS
He's a box fighter?

HALLORAN
A wrestler.

PROPRIETRESS
(laughs)
Boxing, wrestling, what do I know?
(returns photo)
Five cents, pleez.

Halloran takes out coin, gives it to her. The woman's brow
furrows suddenly. She picks up photo again.

PROPRIETRESS
Pleez.

She studies photo, puts her hand across it to block out all
but the face.

PROPRIETRESS
(continuing)
He's a feller likes to play the
whatchamacallit?

She gestures playing the harmonica. Halloran almost jumps
out of his skin.

HALLORAN
The harmonica! Yes!

PROPRIETRESS
Sure, I know him -- Willie!

HALLORAN
Where does he live?

PROPRIETRESS
This street someplace.

HALLORAN
What house?

PROPRIETRESS
Down the street someplace. I dunno.

Halloran walks quickly around counter into store. He crosses
to phone, dials. The proprietress comes up to him with an
anxious look.

PROPRIETRESS
Who you, Mista?

Halloran doesn't answer.

PROPRIETRESS
(continuing)
You from a collection agency, maybe?

HALLORAN
(into phone)
Ben? This is Jimmy. Dan there?
(listens)
When he gets back, tell him I've
located Garza. Somewhere on Rivington
between Delancey and Essex. 'Bye.

He hangs up. The proprietress timidly plucks his sleeve.

PROPRIETRESS
Pleez, Mista -- by me Willie's a
nice feller. A man likes kids, he's
nice. Any little kid asks him, Willie
plays his whatchamacallit. I don't
want I should make trouble for him.

HALLORAN
(showing badge)
Don't worry, lady.

Halloran leaves.

PROPRIETRESS
(calling after him)
You don't want your root beer, Mista?

EXT. SQUIBB BUILDING - DAY

Mulvey, Perelli, Niles and another detective are on their
way into the building. A police sedan is parked at curb.

EXT. RIVINGTON STREET - DAY

Halloran walks up to a thin, stooped woman who is sitting on
steps with a baby in her arms

HALLORAN
Does Willie Garza live here?
(shows photo)

The woman looks at photo, speaks with an Italian accent.

WOMAN
He'sa not live here.

HALLORAN
You sure?

WOMAN
My hoosband he'sa janitor. I'm
positive.

HALLORAN
Thanks.

He moves on.

INT. CORRIDOR OF SQUIBB BUILDING - DAY

Mulvey and his party are walking along a series of offices.
The windows are marked "Dr. Stoneman." An arrow points to an
entrance further on. Mulvey gestures to a detective we haven't
seen before, to cover Stoneman's last door.

MULVEY
Nobody gets by you.

The party goes on, enters reception room. There are three
patients waiting. Mulvey goes up to nurse, shows badge,
whispers.

MULVEY
I'm Lieutenant Mulvey of the Police
Department. Is Dr. Stoneman in?

NURSE
He's with a patient.

MULVEY
I want you to do exactly as I say,
Miss. Tell the patients who are
waiting that they have to leave.

NURSE
But --

MULVEY
Do what I say, Miss --

The nurse looks at him, rises.

EXT. RIVINGTON STREET - DAY

Halloran walks up to two little girls who are playing jacks
on the steps of a house.

HALLORAN
Do you kids know a man who lives on
this street by the name of Willie
Garza?

The girls look at each other blankly.

HALLORAN
(continuing)
He plays the harmonica.

One of the girls smiles.

GIRL
I know him. Willie.

HALLORAN
Where does he live?

GIRL
Across the street -- corner house, I
think -- or the next one.

HALLORAN
Good girl.

Leaves.

INT. STONEMAN'S OFFICE - DAY

The nurse is just closing the door on the last of the
patients. She turns on Mulvey angrily.

NURSE
This is really unheard of.

MULVEY
I know, M'am.
(to Niles)
Sit there. Don't say anything.

He points to a chair directly opposite the entrance to
Stoneman's office. Niles obeys.

MULVEY
(continuing -- to
nurse)
Tell Dr. Stoneman somebody out here
has to see him. Tell him to leave
his patient and come out right now.
And don't tell him anything else.

NURSE
(almost weeping)
I'll lose my job over this.
(picks up phone --
waits)
Doctor --
(beginning to sob)
There's someone here. He has to see
you. You have to come right out.
(listens -- sobbing)
You must, doctor, right now, you
must.

The nurse hangs up with a bang and bursts into tears. Mulvey
and Perelli move quickly into a small recess in the office
behind the nurse's desk. The door opens. Stoneman comes out,
looking very irritated. He stops dead when he sees Niles.

STONEMAN
(icily)
What are you doing here?

Niles says nothing. He is looking at Mulvey. Stoneman turns.

STONEMAN
Who are you?

MULVEY
Lieutenant Mulvey of the Homicide
Squad. Do you go by the name of
Henderson?

Slowly Stoneman seems to cave in.

STONEMAN
Yes.

MULVEY
You're under arrest for the murder
of Jean Dexter.

STONEMAN
(with a low cry of
horror)
No! I couldn't do anything like that.
(swinging on Niles)
If anyone did it, it was him!
(buries head in hands,
sinks into chair)
Finished -- I'm finished now...

MULVEY
What was your relationship to Niles
and Dexter?

STONEMAN
(with a low cry of
shame, ripped from
his gut)
A lamb led to slaughter! An idiot
robbed of self-respect, of manhood,
of decency!
(half sobs; in a low
voice)
I loved that girl the way a sick man
loves alcohol or a narcotic. There
was nothing right about it or good
about it, only a sick hunger. I saw
her a year ago in that dress shop.
And from then on I was drunk with
her, lost.
(turns on Niles)
For six months now I've known they've
been using me. I was their tipster --
me -- Stoneman.

MULVEY
What do you mean?

STONEMAN
It wasn't enough I poured money out
on her. Jean was twisted inside,
too, like me.
(with a bewildered
cry)
What does life do to people that it
can set up such unnatural hungers in
them -- me for a woman like her --
and she for money?
(gestures)
She was a common thief.
(looking at Niles)
Both of them. They used my social
connections. My wife is a partygiver.
Jean'd find out from me who was to
be there. And it was only after months
that I realized that when someone
came to my house, his apartment was
robbed the same night.

MULVEY
Why didn't you go to the police?

Stoneman gestures despairingly.

STONEMAN
Why doesn't a drug addict stop taking
drugs? She kept promising me each
time was the last. I believed her
because I wanted to believe her. I
believed her because I was afraid to
go to the police -- afraid of the
scandal. You can read about sick
people like me in medical literature.
Here I am. Look at me. I'm
contemptible.

MULVEY
Did you arrange the robbery of your
own apartment?

STONEMAN
Yes. I even came to that. I was
frightened and I had to wallow in my
own filth.
(jumps up)
Oh, I'm so glad you came. Prison is
much better than insanity -- and I'm
half mad already.
(with a groan)
Oh, Stoneman, what have you become?

MULVEY
What proof have you that you didn't
kill Dexter?

STONEMAN
Proof?
(rubs hand over brow)
I was someplace else -- Miss Owen --
my date book -- yes -- a birthday
party -- at the Broughtons.

MULVEY
Will you testify in court that Niles
and Dexter did these robberies?

NILES
(with a cry)
I never did!

MULVEY
Shut up.

STONEMAN
No, they were the fixers, the smart
ones. They used me one way -- they
hired other men for the actual
robberies.

MULVEY
Who?

Stoneman rubs hand over brow.

STONEMAN
I don't know.
(to Nurse)
Miss Owen -- my practice -- Oh, don't
cry...
(groans)
You'll call Dr. Grenard.
(to Mulvey --
beseechingly)
Only don't let me have to see
anyone... Not my wife... no friends...
no lawyer. Just lock me up and hide
me away.
(suddenly stiffens,
looks around)
Me? Stoneman?
(with a cry)
It's impossible. I won't have it.

Suddenly, with a distorted face, he hurtles himself across
the room toward the large window that faces the city.

STONEMAN
(continuing)
I won't have it!

MULVEY
Grab him!

Perelli and another officer make a lunge for Stoneman, but
Niles is closest. Niles leaps for the doctor, tackling him
just as the doctor hits the window pane. The glass is
shattered, but the doctor -- a pitiful and forlorn figure --
is pulled back into a chair. He puts his head in his hands,
sobs brokenly.

MULVEY
(quietly)
I don't know much about medicine,
doctor -- but I'm pretty sure that's
one prescription never cured anything.
(to Niles)
Thanks, Niles. And as long as you
finally made up your mind to
cooperate, why not go all the way?
You're not stupid. You're hooked
now, and you know it. So why not
spill the rest?
(quiet intensity)
Who did the jobs for you? Who was
it?

There is a strained silence for a moment. Then --

NILES
Willie Garza. He and Backalis. They
wanted more of a cut from the
robberies. Garza killed Jean; then
later that night he killed Backalis.
(leans forward)
I loved Jean. I didn't have anything
to do with it. It was Garza...
Garza... Garza...

INT. TENEMENT HOUSE - DAY

Halloran is walking up a flight of stairs. There is the SOUND
of someone practicing scales on the violin. He reaches the
landing, crosses to a door in the search for a number. As he
leaves door we hear a voice from within:

MAN'S VOICE
You must practice more -- practice --

Halloran crosses to another door, listens, knocks. A deep,
hearty voice answers.

GARZA'S VOICE
Come on in!

Halloran enters.

INT. GARZA'S APARTMENT - DAY

A cheaply furnished, two-room apartment. Garza is lying on
the floor doing a wrestler's bridge by way of exercise. He
is a very muscular man in fine condition. At the moment he
is wearing only sneakers and tights. He swivels his head a
little to one side to see who has come in, but he doesn't
change his position. He has a face that combines toughness
and shrewdness; he appears to be about thirty-five.

Throughout the scene we faintly hear the practicing of violin
scales from the other apartment.

GARZA
(genially)
I thought it was the janitor for the
rent. Who're you? Don't mind me.
Just having a little work-out.

As Garza says this, he swivels at the neck and turns his
body and feet and head over, so that he is face down. His
torso and legs have not touched the floor in the course of
the stunt.

HALLORAN
My name's Hawkey -- I work up at
Bellevue Hospital. Are you Willie
Garza?

GARZA
That's me. Ever see me wrestle? I
wasn't so bad.
(swivels body over)

HALLORAN
No, I never did. There's a patient
at the hospital gave me your address --
asked me to see you.

GARZA
Yeah. Who?

He works his body up and down, exercising his abdominal
muscles.

HALLORAN
Backalis his name is.

Garza seems to pause for a second. Then he swivels over,
face down.

GARZA
Pete? What's he doin' in the hospital?

HALLORAN
He almost got drowned. Fell in the
river when he was plastered. Some
guy on a tug boat fished him out.

GARZA
You don't say?
(laughs)
Oh, that Pete. Can't let the booze
alone. So what does he want from me?
(swivels around)

HALLORAN
He says he wants to see you.

GARZA
You know what he wants?
(lowers body to floor)
He wants money.

Now Garza raises legs high, then does a snap up. He lands
feet on floor.

GARZA
(continuing)
Some condition I'm in, hey, brother?
(crosses to a chair
for a towel)
Don't smoke, don't drink.
(rubs body with towel)
So Pete wants money again?
(shakes head... coming
closer)
You know what you can tell him, buddy?

Now, from several feet away, Garza suddenly leaps like a
cat. The heavy Turkish towel goes over Halloran's head. Garza
grabs him, trips him, slams him savagely to the floor. In
another second his legs have scissored over Halloran's and
one hand holds Halloran's arm in a hammer lock.

GARZA
(continuing)
Lay still or I'll snap your arm like
a wishbone.

His free hand explores Halloran's pockets, then finds the
gun around his hip. He removes gun, presses it into Halloran's
ribs. Then he disengages himself, gets up. Halloran slowly
rises.

GARZA
(continuing)
Copper, ain't you?

HALLORAN
Yeah.

GARZA
Just because I'm big, everybody thinks
I'm dumb. I'm not dumb, I'm smart.
Now how did I know you were a copper?
Because nobody knows where I live --
not even Pete Backalis.

HALLORAN
If you're smart, you'll come down to
headquarters with me.

GARZA
Ha-ha -- that wouldn't be smart. You
know why? 'Cause Backalis ain't in
Bellevue, he's in the morgue.
(dangerously)
Turn around.

HALLORAN
(obeying)
Don't be a fool.

From now on CAMERA becomes Halloran's eyes. We see only what
Halloran sees -- a stretch of dirty wallpaper and a cheap
reproduction of da Vinci's Last Supper thumbtacked to the
wall.

GARZA'S VOICE
I'll prove I'm smart, copper. You
know how? You're scared right now
I'm gonna rub you out. But I ain't --
'cause I'm smart. Ain't nobody can
prove I rubbed out Backalis. So why
should I knock you off? Rub out a
cop an' you'll really get the chair.
All I need to do is put you to sleep.
Then I'm off. Try an' find me. This
is a great big, beautiful city. Just
try an' find me.

There is a grunt from Garza, the sound of a fist striking
flesh. The picture of the Last Supper suddenly blurs violently
as the CAMERA shakes. Then the CAMERA starts tilting towards
the floor.

GARZA'S VOICE
That was a rabbit punch, Copper.
It's strictly illegal.

Again there is the crack of a fist. The screen goes black.

INT. STONEMAN'S RECEPTION ROOM - DAY

Mulvey is at the phone. Perelli, Niles, and Dr. Stoneman are
on their way out of the office.

MULVEY
(into phone)
Yeah, he signed it. Wait a minute,
Ben.
(to Perelli; calling)
Keep Niles away from the newspaper
men.
(into phone)
And listen, Ben -- when Halloran
calls in -- or Fowler or Constentino --
tell 'em that Willie Garza may be
the gimmick in this case. So --
(stops talking,
listens; suddenly
snaps up)
When did Halloran call in? Was he
alone?
(listens)
Now get this -- send out an emergency!
Rush every available squad car. Block
off the street. Surround it.

He hangs up. Jumps to his feet. Starts running out.

INT. POLICE HEADQUARTERS RADIO ROOM - DAY

A patrolman is crossing quickly from plotting table to radio
operator at microphone. He gives operator a paper.

PATROLMAN
Emergency!

OPERATOR
(into microphone)
Emergency... All squad cars on the
East Side of 14th Street to the
Williamsburg Bridge, from 1st Street
to 5th Avenue, proceed immediately
to Rivington Street between Essex
and Delancey. Block off and surround
both sides of the street. Institute
immediate house-to-house search for --

INT. SQUAD CAR (PROCESS) - DAY

swinging around in middle of street and then racing down
Third Avenue with siren screaming. The operator's voice
continued.

OPERATOR'S VOICE
-- two men -- Detective James Halloran
and William Garza. Halloran is twenty-
eight years old...

INT. GARZA'S ROOM - DAY

Halloran is stretched out near wall, unconscious. Garza has
put on a sport shirt and trousers. He still wears sneakers.
The butts of two guns show above his belt, at waist line. He
is stuffing four small chamois bags into both side pockets.
He grabs up a sports jacket, puts it on. He opens a cupboard
drawer, takes out a harmonica, puts it in a side pocket of
his jacket. Then he goes out. The instant the door shuts
Halloran sits up. The sudden movement makes him gasp with
nausea. He remains still a second, then slowly pushes himself
to his feet. On wobbly legs he starts for the door.

INT. STAIRCASE - DAY

Garza is coming rapidly downstairs.

INT. GARZA - DAY

as seen down stairwell by Halloran. Halloran starts down
slowly, on shaky legs, holding to banister.

INT. FIRST-FLOOR LANDING - DAY

CAMERA IS SHOOTING UP as Garza comes down.

SOUND: A police siren; a second, a third, approaching. Garza
freezes for a second, then races down the last steps to the
landing. He runs to the front door, flattens himself against
the wall and glances out through the glass.

EXT. TENEMENT ACROSS FROM GARZA - DAY

CAMERA IS GARZA'S EYES.

A black police sedan is moving slowly along. A detective is
questioning the two little girls who are playing jacks. One
of them points toward Garza's tenement. CAMERA SWINGS to
show cops and plainclothesmen leaping out of cars. CAMERA
SWINGS other way to show Mulvey and others starting across
street at a run.

INT. HALLWAY - DAY

Garza turns, starts running toward back of hall. As he does
so, he sees Halloran coming down last flight of stairs. Garza
pulls out a gun but keeps running. Halloran hurtles down,
swings out and around, trips and falls. At the same instant
of his falling, Garza has swung around while opening the
back door. He fires; the bullet shatters the window of the
front door. Garza leaps outside. Halloran gets up, runs
towards the back door. The front door swings open. Mulvey
rushes in, gun in hand.

MULVEY
(yelling)
Jimmy!

HALLORAN
(without stopping)
This way.

Mulvey runs after him.

EXT. BACK YARD TENEMENT HOUSE - DAY

It is a mass of clotheslines, with wet wash hanging from
every line. Garza is about to climb the fence at one end,
when he spots Halloran in pursuit. He stops and fires another
shot. Halloran falls flat on the pavement; then gets up
untouched. He follows Garza over the fence. Mulvey appears
at Halloran starts over. He changes course, runs out down a
side alley.

EXT. ALLEYWAY - DAY

On the other side of the fence is a long alleyway, with ash
cans and piles of junk in evidence. Garza runs down the
alleyway with Halloran still in pursuit. Garza stops and
fires again. Halloran drops behind an ash can as the bullet
ricochets off it.

EXT. END OF ALLEYWAY - DAY

Garza climbs another fence, finds himself in back of a butcher
store. He dashes into the store, with Halloran following a
few seconds later.

INT. BUTCHER STORE - DAY

as Garza runs through with gun in hand, followed by Halloran.
The clerks and customers stare in horror.

EXT. STREET IN FRONT OF BUTCHER STORE - DAY

This is Delancey Street, a business thoroughfare. Across the
street stands the approach to the huge Williamsburg Bridge
which crosses the East River to Brooklyn. The street is
crowded with automobiles. Garza races across. Halloran
follows. Coming up behind Halloran is Qualen, the detective
we saw earlier at Stoneman's.

EXT. DELANCEY STREET - DAY

as Garza disregards traffic and runs across. A truck swerves
to escape hitting him. Another car jams on brakes. A third
car crashes into the second. A traffic cop blows his whistle
furiously. Halloran keeps after Garza. Qualen has caught up
with Halloran now. Garza starts up the stone steps to the
footwalk on the bridge. Qualen fires, misses. Garza turns,
fires. Both Qualen and Halloran hurl themselves to sidewalk.
Garza runs. They follow.

EXT. STREET - DAY

Mulvey, detectives, run up. Traffic is now stationary. Mulvey
runs toward cop.

MULVEY
(yelling)
Hold all bridge traffic.
(to a cop)
Stop traffic on the Brooklyn end.

He runs to a radio car which swings into scene. Jumps in.

EXT. BRIDGE FOOTWALK - DAY

CAMERA FRAMES the city. Suddenly frame is filled by sweaty,
distorted face of Garza as he climbs onto footwalk. He turns
violently.

EXT. QUALEN AND HALLORAN - DAY

from Garza's angle. Garza fires, Qualen falls back down steps
into Halloran's arms, almost hurling Halloran down. Garza
turns, runs.

EXT. ENTRANCE TO MANHATTAN SIDE OF BRIDGE - DAY

as traffic cop stops all traffic, as instructed by Mulvey.

EXT. BROOKLYN SIDE OF BRIDGE - DAY

as traffic cop steps away from police call box and starts to
stop traffic.

EXT. LONG SHOT OF BRIDGE SHOOTING DOWN - DAY

showing bridge traffic disappearing. CAMERA picks out running
men: Garza, Halloran, several cops. Then it picks out the
squad car in which Mulvey is. The car races ahead of Garza,
then stops. Men tumble out. Garza, seeing himself trapped,
breaks for the subway tracks in order to cross to the other
side. As he is climbing the fence, one of the squad car
policemen stops running, kneels, aims a rifle. He shoots.
Garza is hit, knocked over the fence and forward by the impact
of the bullet. He staggers, trips over a rail, falls to his
knees, slumps over -- and hits the third rail. There is a
shower of sparks, his body leaps convulsively -- then is
still.

A siren WAILS, higher and higher. CAMERA TILTS toward
buildings of Manhattan, showing sky above. Siren fades out.

EXT. SKY - NIGHT MOON RIDING THROUGH FAST CLOUDS

NARRATOR
It's two o'clock in the morning now...

EXT. ROCKEFELLER CENTER - NIGHT

NARRATOR
This is the city...

EXT. BROADWAY AND TIMES SQUARE - NIGHT

NARRATOR
...these are the lights...

EXT. A NIGHTCLUB - NIGHT

A couple stepping into a taxicab. The two are young, handsome.
The girl is laughing, her face excited, alive, joyous.

NARRATOR
...that a child born to the name of
Batory hungered for... Her passion
has been played out now...

EXT. NEWSBOYS - NIGHT

getting newspapers from truck in front of Times Building.

NARRATOR
...her name, her face, her history,
were worth five cents a day for six
days...

EXT. STREET CLEANER - NIGHT

sweeping up newspapers.

NARRATOR
...and tomorrow will be sold by the
bale...

EXT. HALLORAN AND WIFE - NIGHT

standing on a subway platform. He looks down. Between the
tracks is a newspaper with a picture of Jean Dexter. A train
comes in, the rush of wind blows away the paper. Halloran
puts his arm around his wife.

NARRATOR
She is not quite forgotten, however...

INT. RUTH YOUNG - NIGHT

Riverside Drive apartment. She is gazing out of her bedroom
window, at the Hudson flowing in moonlight. Her face is
somber. She is in a dressing robe.

NARRATOR
...not altogether...

EXT. THE BATORYS - NIGHT

Mrs. Batory is rocking slowly on the porch of a small frame
house. Her face is impassive. Mr. Batory lies on a couch
behind her. His face is in shadow.

NARRATOR
...not entirely...

EXT. PRESBYTERIAN HOSPITAL -- 168TH STREET - NIGHT

NARRATOR
...and now there is violence once
again in the city...

INT. DELIVERY ROOM - NIGHT

Doctor, nurses -- around delivery table

NARRATOR
...but of another sort.

INT. DOCTOR - NIGHT

walks away from table with newborn baby.

NARRATOR
...naked and innocent he comes into
this world...

INT. DOCTOR - NIGHT

holds baby upside down by feet, slaps its buttocks sharply.
Baby wails.

NARRATOR
...comes to meet the city... naked
into a naked city...

INT. NURSE - NIGHT

takes baby from doctor, carries it to basket. Baby is wailing.

NARRATOR
What will he be at twenty?

INT. MOTHER'S FACE - NIGHT

Quiet, tired.

NARRATOR
What will her boy be...

INT. NILES - NIGHT

on a cot in a cell, staring up at ceiling.

NARRATOR
who was born at two o'clock in the
morning...

EXT. TREES IN CENTRAL PARK - NIGHT

NARRATOR
...on a hot summer night...

EXT. MULVEY - NIGHT

sitting with his back to a tree, smoking, looking up at sky.

NARRATOR
...at the time of a shooting star?

EXT. SKY - NIGHT

A star is falling.

FADE OUT:

THE END

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