"In writing fiction, the more fantastic the tale, the plainer the prose should be. Don't ask your readers to admire your words when you want them to believe your story." - Ben Bova [ more quotes ]

"GRAND HOTEL"

Screenplay by

Béla Balázs

Based on the play "Menschen im Hotel"

By Vicki Baum

American version

By William A. Drake

SHOOTING DRAFT



PROLOGUE

Berlin.

Season is March.

Action of the picture takes place in approximately 36 hours.

Picture commences at approximately 12:35 in the day.

Time: The Present.



EXTERIOR REVOLVING DOOR

Show general natural action of people going in and people
coming out but in it is the definite inference of people
arriving and people leaving the big hotel.

MOVE INSIDE THROUGH THE REVOLVING DOOR -- very quickly. CAMERA
PAUSES ON THE THRESHOLD like a human being, seeing and
hearing.

DISSOLVE OUT.

DISSOLVE INTO: Clock. It is twenty minutes to one -- and
then moves slowly into the crowd of busy mid-day business
jumble.

CAMERA pushes through crowd and passes by the foot of the
steps that lead up to the restaurant. In its journey, it
passes Kringelein looking up. He is not pointed.

THE CAMERA then saunters -- getting a slow profile movement
across -- near Senf's desk. Senf is very busy. THE CAMERA
now passes -- profile -- the desk of Senf. General action.
Senf stands before his background of slots and keys. WE
PROCEED until we are facing the elevator.

At that moment the elevator is opening. Among the people who
emerge is Suzette, who moves too quickly for us to distinguish
who she is.

THE CAMERA PANS quickly with her and in the distance we hear
her saying to Senf:

SUZETTE
Madam Grusinskaya will not want her
car.

This line is only just above the general clatter of action
but it is picked-up sharply first by Senf then by Bell-Captain --
and as the CAMERA SLOWLY TURNS AROUND, we see the boy going
towards the door and we hear the voice in the distance,
saying:

VOICE
Cancel Madam Grusinskaya's car.

The CAMERA now backs away from the scene into the BAR. (a
section.) It backs to the back of the bar and proceeds -- in
profile -- behind the backs of the barmen. A mixed crowd of
people drinking before their lunch.

We pick up the Doctor, leaning his head upon his hands,
looking into space. The woman next to him, a noisy blonde,
is laughing. The doctor glances up at her -- she glances at
the doctor. She and the audience see the scarred side of his
face -- the laugh dies on her lips and she turns suddenly to
her companion, who is the Baron. We do not get much of a
chance to see him because at that instant he is glancing at
his watch, his shoulders are turning away from THE CAMERA
and he moves out towards the lobby.

BACK UP a few feet and LAP DISSOLVE as you move into the
main aisle of busy room in restaurant. Great activity of
waiters. The bustle and activity of fashionable lunchtime. A
string orchestra is playing.

Among other things, we pick up the smiling face of the pompous
Maitre d'hotel, he has apparently just shown someone important
to a table.

THE CAMERA watches his face and follows him. His face just
as CAMERA reaches service table. The pompous Maitre d'hotel
now becomes a thing of drama as he demands of a waiter:

MAITRE D'HOTEL
Where is that gentleman's soup?

The waiter, frightened and perspiring, doesn't bother to
argue -- he tears off quickly (CAMERA FOLLOWING HIM) to
another service table. The waiter seizes buss-boy's arm:

WAITER
Where's that soup?

Boy goes off at great rate of speed, CAMERA FOLLOWS HIM,
into service room of kitchen. Boy stops at soup chef's
counter. He is not the only waiter wanting soup at that
moment. He pushes his way to the front and puts his ticket
forward.

BOY
Quick -- come on -- come on...

The soup chef, used to impatient waiters, makes no exception
of the young man. He looks at him as much as to say: "I'll
slap you on the mouth." At the same time he is pulling over
a cauldron of soup.

CUT TO:

CAULDRON OF SOUP being pulled over -- it dislodges a small
cauldron that is near the edge. We see the soup fall and
hear the scream of a woman before showing her agonized face --
She has been scalded. General steamy confusion. The chef has
filled the plate. WE PROCEED the buss-boy out. Half way down
the aisle, the waiter takes it from him.

THE CAMERA follows the waiter who places the soup before Mr.
Preysing. Preysing has been waiting, with his serviette
carefully tucked in his collar. His spoon is in his hand. A
horrible man, ready for action. The soup is in front of him,
he tastes it, pushes it away, frowns, we feel he is going to
tear the place down.

WAITER
(anxious voice)
Yes.

PREYSING
(grimly)
Cold.

VOICE
(near Preysing's elbow)
Mr. Preysing...

PREYSING
(in same voice)
Yes...

BELLBOY
Telephone -- from Fredersdorf --

Preysing rises, struts from restaurant. CAMERA FOLLOWS HIM --
He walks out through the door...

DISSOLVE OUT AND INTO:

Between two operators heads. Odd effect at board. CAMERA
TILTS UP as Preysing's head looks right down at girl.

Bellboy is with Preysing.

BELLBOY
Mr. Preysing from Fredersdorf -- his
call.

GIRL
Yes, Mr. Preysing --

Preysing begins drumming his fingers on the top of
switchboard.

GIRL
(nervously)
They've gone -- Just a moment, sir...

PREYSING
(to boy)
You told me it was on -- you said
the call was through.
(he waits irritably)

SECOND GIRL
(to first)
Who's in number three?

FIRST GIRL
Senf -- the hall porter.
(Girl looks off at...)

CUT TO:

SENF IN TELEPHONE BOOTH

SENF
Yes, it's Senf, the head porter,
Grand Hotel... Are you at the
Clinic?,... How's my wife?,... Is
she in pain?,... Isn't the child
coming soon?,... Patience! It's easy
for you to talk... Get away?,... No,
I can't -- I'd lose my job. It's
like being in jail. Oh, I hope the
child comes along all right.

At the conclusion of Senf's speech, CAMERA MOVES TO NEXT
BOOTH. Thru the glass door we see Preysing approaching from
desk. He enters booth and commences conversation:

PREYSING
Hello! Long Distance?,... Get off
the wire... No... I was talking to
Fredersdorf... What?,... Oh...
Hello!... Is that you dear?... How
is everything at home?... What do
you hear from the factory?... No...
How are the children?... I left my
shaving set at home... Yes, is your
father there?... Hello, father?...
Our stock has gone down twenty-three
points. If our merger with the Saxonia
doesn't go through -- I don't know
what we can do... Hello, hello...
yes, papa. Rely on me -- everything
depends on Manchester... If they
refuse to come in -- well, we will
be in bad shape... no... Rely on me,
I'll make it go through -- I'll make
it go through... Waiting?... Yes,
I'm still speaking...

THE CAMERA THEN PANS TO Suzette. Suzette is already in the
booth and she is waiting for Mr. Meierheim to come on.

SUZETTE
(starting to speak)
Hello, Mr. Meierheim?... Is that,
Mr. Meierheim?... This is Suzette...
Suzette, Madam Grusinskaya's maid...
No... Madam Grusinskaya will not go
to the rehearsal... No... Madam is
in a terrible state, she didn't sleep
all night -- She's very tired... No,
I'm speaking from a booth -- I didn't
want to speak in front of her... I
gave her a tablet of veronal... She's
sleeping now... You had better come
to the hotel, I'm afraid...

PAN TO BARON just entering booth. He is lighting a cigarette.
(receiver down - trick)

BARON
(speaking into
telephone)
Baron Gaigern speaking. Yes, Baron
Gaigern himself. Where are you?,...
Good... No -- first, I need money. I
need it right now. I have to make a
showing... That's my business. I
hope to do it tonight... at the
theatre or after the show... But
money -- for the hotel bill, for
tips... I don't need advice, I need
money!... Now, listen...

PAN TO KRINGELEIN - booth.

KRINGELEIN
Who is that, This is... Hello,
hello!... Who is that... Heinrich?
This is Kringelein. Hello, Heinrich.
This is Otto Kringelein. Hello! Can
you hear me?... I've got to speak
very quickly. Every minute costs two
marks ninety... What?... Otto
Kringelein! Yes, I'm in Berlin,
staying at the best hotel, the Grand
Hotel... No, don't you understand? I
want to explain, but I must do so
quickly, it costs so much. Please
don't interrupt me -- hello? Hello!
Listen! You know that will I made
before my operation? I gave it to
you. I want you to tear it up. Destroy
it. Because, listen, I came to Berlin
to see a great specialist about that
old trouble of mine... It's pretty
bad, Heinrich. The specialist says I
can't live much longer.
(louder)
I haven't long to live! That's what's
the matter! Hello, hello. Are you on
the line? No, it isn't nice to be
told a thing like that. All sorts of
things run through your head. I am
going to stay here in Berlin. I am
never coming back to Fredersdorf.
Never! I want to get something out
of life, too. You plague, and bother,
and save -- and all of a sudden you
are dead. Heinrich... You don't say
anything. I am in the Grand Hotel,
do you understand, the most expensive
hotel in Berlin? I'm going to get a
room here. The very best people stay
here. Our big boss, Preysing, too. I
saw him -- not five minutes after I
was here. Sometime, I'd like to tell
him exactly what I think of him.
Listen, Heinrich -- I have taken all
my savings; my life insurance, too;
I cashed in all my policies, the
sick benefit fund, the old age
pension, the unemployment insurance,
the burial fund and everything...
What's that, miss?... Hello, Heinrich.
I have to hang up now. I have to pay
three times overcharge. Just think,
Heinrich! There's music here all day
long. And in the evening, they go
around in full dress... Yes, sometimes
I have pain, but I can stand it.
Everything is frightfully expensive
here. You can imagine, the Grand
Hotel... What? Time's up...

Near the conclusion of Kringelein's speech, we see the Doctor
approaching through Kringelein's booth. He is looking down
at something.

CUT TO:

COMPLETE REVERSE - MATCH SHOT - SHOOT THEM BOTH TOGETHER

Doctor is looking down at parcel. Kringelein's voice on same
track. CAMERA BACKS UP. Show doctor as he passes various
booths -- voices of respective people come up sharply.

KRINGELEIN
I'm a sick man -- Heinrich -- Hello -
hello -- Operator -- every minute
two marks ninety.

Doctor passes Baron's booth next.

BARON
Dangerous?... That's my business...
I'll do it tonight -- ...I'll do it
alone.

Doctor passes Suzette's booth.

SUZETTE
Madam is afraid -- she will never
dance again -- there was no applause
last night --

Doctor passes Preysing's booth.

PREYSING
Yes -- the merger -- Manchester --
it is my business as much as yours --
we've already lost eighty-five
thousand --

Doctor passes Senf's booth.

SENF
I'm on duty -- I can't leave the
Grand Hotel -- it's like being in
prison -- the baby --

Doctor crosses to telephone operator:

DOCTOR
(to operator)
Any calls?

GIRL
No, Doctor.

DOCTOR
(half to himself)
Grand Hotel -- people -- coming --
going... Who cares... nothing ever
happens.

FADE OUT.

SEQUENCE "#1"

FACADE OF HOTEL

showing electric sign -- odd angle -- THE GRAND HOTEL --
unlighted.

CUT TO:

ELECTRIC CONTROL ROOM

small section -- Engineer pulling down lever.

FACADE OF HOTEL

sign flashes on.

DISSOLVE OUT:

DISSOLVE INTO: EXTERIOR HOTEL

Shooting directly on swinging door -- normal crowd action.
Tea-dansant at this hour is daily rendezvous for smart demi-
mondaines, gigolos, out-of-town travelers, etc. -- These
types indicated.

In the distance we hear music.

DISSOLVE SUDDENLY TO:

YELLOWROOM - NEAR SHOT OF BAND

This same music is being played by the Eastman Jazz Band in
the Yellow Room of the hotel.

THE CAMERA does not wait but backs down the room. It is the
hour of the tea-dansant.

As the CAMERA IS BACKING OUT OF THE ROOM which is in reality
the restaurant converted -- the tall figure of the Baron --
he proceeds through the door of the restaurant --

Note: Question here as to whether Yellow Room will be the
restaurant converted, or not. In which case it will be
necessary to add scene of Baron walking through corridor
upstairs -- giving sense of distance.

The Baron is whistling the tune of the orchestra, he proceeds
through the lobby as if on a mission. He glances at a pretty
woman who passes and nods good evening to the Doctor, who is
seated in his chair, not far from the desk. He enters.

CUT TO:

FLORIST SHOP

Pretty girl is there, she has seen him coming. She turns
from the door and hands him a box of orchids, already tied
in ribbon.

BARON
Good little girl -- nice ones?

GIRL
Yes, Baron.

The Baron would stay and flirt but he has a mission; he
leaves.

CUT TO:

LOBBY

In the lobby we pick up the Baron leaving the florists with
small box of flowers -- he crosses quickly to Senf's desk.

SHOT OVER SENF'S HEAD as the Baron puts the flowers down.
Senf is busy.

The Baron is whistling gaily -- tapping his fingers on the
flower box -- he is good-natured and patient.

SENF
(to Clerk -- as
telephone bell rings)
Is that for me?

CLERK
No -- Madam Grusinskaya's car is to
be brought.
(he replaces the
receiver)

SENF
(to one of the bellboys)
Madam Grusinskaya's car is to be
brought.

Boy leaves. We hear his voice out of scene at the door.

BELLBOY'S VOICE
Madam Grusinskaya's car... to be
brought.

SENF
Good evening, Baron.

BARON
(amiably)
Good evening. Will you send these up
to Madam Grusinskaya?

SENF
Yes, Baron.
(he hands the box of
flowers to the clerk)
Madam Grusinskaya.

Clerk hands box to bellboy.

CLERK
Room one-seventy -- Madam Grusinskaya.

BARON
(to Senf)
Have you my tickets for the theatre?

SENF
Oh yes, Baron --
(to Clerk)
Baron von Gaigern's seats for Madam
Grusinskaya.

Telephone rings again. Clerk picks it up.

SENF
(to Clerk)
For me?

CLERK
(at telephone -- shakes
his head)
No -- Madam Grusinskaya's car is not
to be brought.

SENF
(to boy)
Madam Grusinskaya's car is not to be
brought.

The Clerk hands Senf the tickets which Senf hands to the
Baron.

BARON
Charge them...

As the Baron is picking up his tickets he looks around quickly
as he hears the voice of Pimenov, who has arrived apparently
from his afternoon walk from the rehearsal at the theatre.

PIMENOV
(to Senf)
Good evening -- my key -- one sixty-
eight.

BARON
Good evening, Mr. Pimenov.

PIMENOV
Oh -- good evening, Baron.

BARON
How's the beautiful lady?

PIMENOV
Grusinskaya -- well, to tell the
truth, Baron -- tonight we are a
little bit nervous. Were you at the
theatre last night?

BARON
Certainly -- always when Grusinskaya
dances.

PIMENOV
Well -- last night was not so good.

BARON
I thought she was splendid!

PIMENOV
Yes -- but the audience.

At that moment they are interrupted by a vehement little
Japanese with his wife. They are arguing with the Clerk. The
Japanese speaks in Japanese to his wife.

CLERK
(to Japanese)
The parquot loges are behind the
parquet chairs.

JAPANESE
Then they've put me back and I want
to be up in front. How is that, chairs
in front of loges?

Senf is speaking to a lady at the same time.

SENF
The train leaves at seven-thirty,
Madam. That is the only through train --
the dining car goes along.

The Baron and Pimenov exchange glances as the little Japanese
speaks volubly to his wife.

BARON
(sarcastically)
It's always so quiet here.

PIMENOV
If you occupied the room next to
Madam Grusinskaya, you would
appreciate the quiet of a hotel lobby.

BARON
My dear sir, I would gladly change
rooms with you.

PIMENOV
(effeminately)
No doubt you would, Baron. But do
you know, I'm quite indispensable to
her. I'm her ballet master and her
nurse. I hardly belong to myself
anymore. But, there you are, it's
Grusinskaya -- you can't help adoring
her.

At that moment, Zinnowitz pushes past them.

ZINNOWITZ
Pardon me.
(addressing Senf)
Is Mr. Preysing in -- I am Doctor
Zinnowitz.

SENF
(to bellboy)
Mr. Preysing -- from Fredersdorf --

BELLBOY
(quickly -- paging)
Mr. Preysing --

Preysing steps quickly into scene.

PREYSING
Ach! Here you are, Doctor Zinnowitz.

ZINNOWITZ
Have I kept you waiting?

PREYSING
Waiting -- I'm waiting for news from
Manchester.

ZINNOWITZ
No news yet?

PREYSING
No. No word.

ZINNOWITZ
Everything depends on the Manchester
merger.

PREYSING
I know -- I know.

ZINNOWITZ
I saw Gerstenkorn at lunch -- and as
your lawyer I made it my business to
broach the matter ---

As they begin to move out of scene, Zinnowitz calls back to
Senf.

ZINNOWITZ
I'm expecting a young woman -- a
stenographer -- she will ask for Mr.
Preysing. Ask her to wait.

SENF
Yes, Doctor Zinnowitz.

As they move out of scene, telephone bell goes.

SENF
(to Clerk)
For me?

CLERK
No -- letters to two-eighty.

SENF
(to Clerk)
If a young woman, a stenographer, --
etc.

This just covers the scene.

The Baron and Pimenov are laughing at something one of them
has said which brings our attention to them again.

At that moment the Doctor enters the scene.

DOCTOR
Any letters?

SENF
No, Doctor.

DOCTOR
Telegrams?

SENF
No, Doctor.

DOCTOR
Anyone asked for me?

SENF
Nobody, Doctor.

The Doctor turns slowly away, taking out a cigarette with
his one hand.

BARON
(glancing at Doctor)
The war.

PIMENOV
(looking up from his
letter -- glances
off at the doctor)
That is Doctor Otternschlag -- You
know him?

BARON
Yes -- He always seems to be waiting
for something -- and nothing ever
comes.

PIMENOV
The war dropped him here and forgot
him.

BARON
(beams)
Yes, I was in the war.

CUT IN: FLASH OF DOCTOR --

He turns as he hears the Baron say this.

He pulls at his cigarette and looks grimly at the Baron...
then he looks off at Kringelein -- who is trying to get
Rohna's attention (the reception Clerk) -- at the reception
desk, which adjoins that of Senf's.

KRINGELEIN'S VOICE
Please -- please pay some attention
to me -- I have no time.

Pan back to desk:

ROHNA
(engaged with a lady
and gentleman, who
have just arrived)
If you will wait one moment, sir.

KRINGELEIN
I won't wait -- I can't wait -- I
waited three days before I got a
room at all and what a room that is.

ROHNA
It's a very nice room and inexpensive,
sir.

KRINGELEIN
Did I say I wanted a cheap room to
live in -- when I came here did I
ask for a cheap room? Did I?

Rohna, sensing a scene with this strange dirty little
gentleman, looks furtively around for the manager.

ROHNA
Just one moment, sir.

KRINGELEIN
No, I won't wait -- I can't -- Every
day is precious -- every hour --
Every minute.

Second Clerk is looking straight at him.

Kringelein turns his attention directly to this man and
proceeds:

KRINGELEIN
I came here because I wanted to live
here, two weeks, maybe three -- God
only knows -- I've told you I'll pay --
I'll pay anything you ask. I'm tired --
I'm ill -- I can't wait.

As he finishes the Doctor draws into the scene -- he is
watching.

Assistant Manager enters.

ASSISTANT MANAGER
Has the gentleman a complaint?

Rohna and Kringelein speak together.

ROHNA
The gentleman is dissatisfied with
room number five fifty-nine.

KRINGELEIN
I certainly have a complaint -- and
a fair one.

He senses an audience and warms up. The Baron and Pimenov
enter the scene. The lady and gentleman have turned. The
bellboy stands watching curiously and even Senf pauses and
looks up.

KRINGELEIN
(continuing)
I came here from a long distance to
stay at the Grand Hotel. I want a
room -- a big room -- like you would
give General Director Preysing --
I'm as good as Mr. Preysing -- I can
pay like Mr. Preysing -- would you
give him a little room, way up in
the corner with the hot water pipes
going -- bang -- bang -- bang...
(he bangs at the desk
with his fist)

DOCTOR
This gentleman can have my room.

KRINGELEIN
(turning)
Oh!

DOCTOR
Send his bags up to my room.

KRINGELEIN
Oh -- but -- I --

DOCTOR
You're tired. I can see that.

KRINGELEIN
Yes -- yes -- I am tired. I have
been ill...

DOCTOR
You are ill.

During this scene the manager has been talking with Rohna
quietly. The manager how turns.

MANAGER
Mr. Kringelein will take room number
one-seventy-six, one of our most
expensive rooms. It is large and on
the front with bath.

KRINGELEIN
(subdued -- exhausted --)
Does that mean that the bath is my
own? --- Private?

MANAGER
Certainly, sir.

KRINGELEIN
Well, now, that's very kind -- thanks.
That's what I want -- a large room
on the front with a private bath --
Yes, that's what I want. I can pay
now if you like.

He takes out his wallet and nervously commences to extract
money.

DOCTOR
That will not be necessary.

The manager is instructing the bellboy to take Kringelein to
the new room.

Kringelein accidentally drops a bill -- the Baron, who has
noticed the money, stoops to pick it up.

In bending himself, Kringelein drops his hat.

Baron picks up the hat and considerately brushes it with his
sleeve.

KRINGELEIN
Thank you, sir.

BARON
(amused)
Not at all, sir.
(he beams)

KRINGELEIN
(finding a friendly
face)
Permit me -- my name is Kringelein --
from Fredersdorf.

BARON
I'm Baron von Gaigern.

KRINGELEIN
Oh, a Baron!
(he is impressed)

Baron catches the mood of making this gentleman suddenly
popular.

BARON
And this is Doctor Otternschlag.

KRINGELEIN
(turning to Doctor)
Oh -- Doctor -- you are a Doctor --
I am --

DOCTOR
I know -- I know -- when a man's
collar is an inch too big for him --
I know he is ill.

KRINGELEIN
Yes -- Oh -- oh -- yes, --
(his finger goes
nervously to his
collar)

Zinnowitz passes through scene quickly on his way out.

At that moment, Pimenov returns from the news-stand, where
he has bought the evening papers.

PIMENOV
Well, Baron -- I must go and dress.

KRINGELEIN
(to doctor)
Is this gentleman a Baron, too?

PIMENOV
(laughing)
Unfortunately no.

The Manager comes into scene.

MANAGER
Will Mr. Kringelein kindly register.

KRINGELEIN
Again?

MANAGER
Please.

Kringelein turns to the desk. The Doctor turns up with him.

At that moment the Baron's chauffeur touches his arm.

CHAUFFEUR
Have you a minute now?

BARON
No -- I told you not to come in this
lobby.

CHAUFFEUR
Time's getting short.

BARON
I've told you a hundred times not to
speak to me with a cigarette in your
mouth.

Chauffeur takes the cigarette out of his mouth -- but still
holds it in his hand.

CHAUFFEUR
I want to speak --

BARON
Not now.

CHAUFFEUR
Yes, sir.

The Baron leaves.

General moving off, towards elevator, of Baron, Pimenov,
Kringelein and the Doctor.

SENF'S DESK

On another shot, shooting profile onto Senf's desk, bring in
Flaemmchen. Flaemmchen enters. Her back to CAMERA.

FLAEMMCHEN
(we hear her ask)
Mr. Preysing.

SENF
Will you wait please.

CLERK
The stenographer is to go up -- Mr.
Preysing telephoned.

SENF
Mr. Preysing -- one sixty-four.

FLAEMMCHEN
Thanks --
(calling off to
elevator)
Heigh! -- Wait!

She crosses to elevator.

THE CAMERA RUSHES UP BEHIND HER, ALMOST PUSHING INTO ELEVATOR
WITH HER.

As she enters the elevator and the gate shuts, she turns
around, back pressed against the Baron -- who is looking
down at her. The look on her face is the look we often see
on Flaemmchen's in elevators when they are pressed.

NOTE: Good introduction, for Flaemmchen.

The lift ascends.

UPPER CORRIDOR

Flaemmchen steps out of the lift. She is looking around for
the numbers. She moves out of scene.

The Doctor, Kringelein and the bellboy with the bag, move
straight down the hall.

Pimenov is chatting volubly.

PIMENOV
(to Baron)
Poor Grusinskaya -- how can she
receive anyone. She can't -- theatre,
trains, hotels -- hotels, trains
theatre.

We see Flaemmchen being directed by the floor clerk to Mr.
Preysing's room.

PIMENOV
(continuing)
I must go and dress -- she'll be
waking up and calling for me.

He proceeds up the passage, pompously, humming the air of
his ballet.

At that moment, Flaemmchen, who has been directed to
Preysing's door, by floor clerk, passes the Baron and there
is an amusing exchange of glances between them.

Flaemmchen knocking at Preysing's door hears a voice.

PREYSING'S VOICE
Come in.

She opens the door.

CUT TO:

PREYSING'S ROOM

Preysing has had a bath and is actually steaming from it. He
stands before a long mirror, rubbing himself with a towel.

He sees her through the mirror, wraps the towel around him
very cutely, for a big man, and turns upon her.

PREYSING
What...! --

FLAEMMCHEN
I'm the stenographer.

PREYSING
Then you will please wait outside.

He is very much affronted.

Flaemmchen, who has seen many large gentlemen in the
altogether --

FLAEMMCHEN
(lightly)
Don't hurry -- take your time.

She goes out of the room and shuts the door.

CUT TO:

UPPER CORRIDOR

Flaemmchen emerges from Preysing's room.

Baron loitering in the hall. (Whistling as outlined). Baron
approaches, he is also whistling -- the same tune that
Flaemmchen is whistling. She glances at him, as he continues
whistling with an amusing dance step, as much as to say:
"Are you mad?"

BARON
Like dancing?

FLAEMMCHEN
Not with strangers.

Baron glances back up the passage; it is apparent that he is
going to make conversation here with this girl, in order to
keep legitimately in the passage until Grusinskaya comes
out.

BARON
(turning to Flaemmchen)
Never?

FLAEMMCHEN
You're a fool!

BARON
Yes, I am rather.

He glances down the passage again, his hands in his pockets.

She glances impatiently at her watch.

BARON
He must be very nice.

FLAEMMCHEN
Who?

BARON
(gallantly)
Whoever is keeping you waiting.

FLAEMMCHEN
(indicating Preysing's
door)
Have you seen it?

BARON
Oh, my large and noisy neighbor --
really? That?
(indicating Preysing's
door)

FLAEMMCHEN
That.

BARON
(with meaning)
You?

FLAEMMCHEN
(quickly)
Oh -- work!!

BARON
(with meaning)
Oh!

FLAEMMCHEN
Dictation.
(she twittles her
fingers)
You know...

BARON
Oh... poor child. If you were free,
I'd ask you to come and have some
tea -- but --

FLAEMMCHEN
Tea would spoil my dinner.
(lightly)
One meal a day, I'd hate to spoil
it.

BARON
Reducing?

FLAEMMCHEN
(she turns invitingly)
No -- why? -- should I?

BARON
Lord no -- charming -- but why one
meal a day?

FLAEMMCHEN
(laughing in his face)
Money -- Ever heard of it?

BARON
Yes -- yes indeed -- but you are
a...
(moves fingers)
...a stenographer. Don't little
stenographers earn little pennies?

FLAEMMCHEN
Very little.

BARON
Too bad.

FLAEMMCHEN
Did you ever see a stenographer with
a decent frock on? -- One that she'd
bought herself?

BARON
Poor child --
(enthusiastically)
I wish I were free tonight -- we
could --

FLAEMMCHEN
(with invitation)
Aren't you?

BARON
(quickly)
What?

FLAEMMCHEN
Free --

BARON
(glancing up passage)
Unfortunately no -- to bad -- tomorrow
though.

FLAEMMCHEN
Tomorrow? What time tomorrow?

BARON
Shall we say five o'clock --
downstairs?

FLAEMMCHEN
Where downstairs?

BARON
Yellow Room where they dance --
(business)

FLAEMMCHEN
You're very funny --

BARON
(with great meaning)
Yes? -- Tomorrow?

FLAEMMCHEN
Of course.

BARON
Really?

Flaemmchen laughs at him.

BARON
We'll dance.

FLAEMMCHEN
(slowly)
All right. We'll dance.

At that moment we hear Kringelein's voice calling from his
doorway at the end of the passage.

KRINGELEIN'S VOICE
Baron -- Oh, Baron!

The Baron turns and looks off at ---

KRINGELEIN

Kringelein is in his door in the distance -- radiant. He
waves.

KRINGELEIN
If I could trouble the Baron to come
and see this beautiful room. I have
ordered champagne. Perhaps the
Baroness could join us.

CUT BACK TO:

FLAEMMCHEN, BARON AND KRINGELEIN

KRINGELEIN
Waiter, oh waiter! Wait a minute!
(to Baron and
Flaemmchen)
We are having caviar -- it's expensive
but that makes no difference -- I
see the Baroness is laughing.

FLAEMMCHEN
Have caviar if you like, but it tastes
like herring to me.

At that moment Grusinskaya's door opens suddenly and Suzette
comes out into the hall.

SUZETTE
Ssshh! Please! Madam is asleep.

KRINGELEIN
Oh!

By this time the others are entering Kringelein's room. The
Baron turns back for a moment.

BARON
(calling back quietly
to Suzette)
Asleep? -- Ssshhh -- sorry!

Suzette turns back into the room.

CUT TO:

GRUSINSKAYA'S ROOM

It is typical hotel. Half-open trunks, etc. Curtains are
drawn -- room is in semi-darkness. There is a sense of
silence, except for distant music coming from the Yellow
Room below.

In Suzette's hands we see one of Grusinskaya's ballet slippers
which she has been mending.

She is about to tiptoe to her seat when she stops suddenly
and looks off dramatically at...

GRUSINSKAYA

Shot from her angle. She is sleeping beneath a Chinese robe,
on the chaise-lounge.

Apparently she has changed her position, because the hand
which is outside the robe moves.

The CAMERA, as though it were Suzette, moves up towards
Grusinskaya. Her eyes are closed. Suzette crosses to the
chaise-lounge and is looking down.

Grusinskaya's eyes open suddenly. She looks at the ceiling
and then her eyes turn and look straight at Suzette.

SUZETTE'S VOICE
(quietly and reverently --
almost a whisper)
Madam has slept well.

GRUSINSKAYA
No, I have been awake -- thinking --
thinking.

SUZETTE'S VOICE
It is time for the performance.

GRUSINSKAYA
The performance?

SUZETTE
It is time.

Like a soldier called to attention Grusinskaya sits suddenly
upright --

GRUSINSKAYA
Always the performance -- every day
the performance -- time for the
performance.
(she pauses and droops
suddenly)
I think, Suzette, I have never been
so tired in my life.
(she takes the bottle
of veronal which is
nearby)
Veronal didn't even help me to sleep.
(laughs a little)

SUZETTE
(speaking into
telephone)
Madam Grusinskaya's car is to be
brought.

While she is speaking Grusinskaya rises -- with the grace of
a dancer she picks up the Chinese robe that has fallen to
the floor and although there is only one other woman in the
room -- she holds the robe around her.

She crosses to the mirror and looks at her face, running her
fingers through her hair. She gently massages under her eyes
and the CAMERA sees Grusinskaya for the first time.

There is silence in the room -- neither of the women speak.

Suzette gets madam's clothes ready. She crosses, puts the
case of pearls down on the dressing table and opens them.

Grusinskaya looks into space -- silence -- dead silence.

Suzette kneels as if to put Madam's stockings on for her.
Grusinskaya pulls her foot away.

GRUSINSKAYA
I can't dance tonight --

SUZETTE
It will pass -- it will pass -- come.

GRUSINSKAYA
Let us cancel the engagement.

SUZETTE
But, Madam. cannot do that.

GRUSINSKAYA
Now is the time to cancel to stop
entirely. I feel it -- everything
tells me -- enough -- enough.

She leans forward against the dressing-table and her hands
unconsciously touch the pearls.

GRUSINSKAYA
(very quietly)
The peals are cold -- everything is
cold -- finished -- it seems so far
away -- so threadbare -- the Russians --
St. Petersburg -- the Imperial Court --
the Grand Duke Sergei --
(long pause as though
she were reliving
incidents of the
past)
-- Sergei -- dead -- Grusinskaya --
it's all gone.

She throws the pearls away, down upon the floor.

SUZETTE
Mon Dieu -- the pearls -- if they
were to break --

GRUSINSKAYA
The pearls won't break -- they hold
together and bring me bad luck ----
I hate them!

Suzette crosses replacing the pearls.

SUZETTE
Orchids come again, Madam -- no card --
I think perhaps they are from the
same young man -- he is at the end
of the corridor -- tall -- he walks
like a soldier -- Madam must have
noticed how often he is in the
elevator with us. Last night for
instance --

GRUSINSKAYA
Oh, Suzette -- Suzette -- Sshh --
quiet.

Grusinskaya's eyes are looking off into space -- she is away
in Russia -- she does not look --

Telephone rings -- Suzette crosses to telephone.

SUZETTE
Ah, oui -- the car is here for Madam.

GRUSINSKAYA
Send it away -- I shan't need it.

There is a knock at the door -- a certain kind of knock.

GRUSINSKAYA
Come in.

She picks up the telephone and as she does so Pimenov enters.
Suzette quickly gives Pimenov a signal that there is trouble.
As Pimenov is closing the door we hear Grusinskaya speak
into telephone.

GRUSINSKAYA
(authoritatively)
Madam Grusinskaya will not require
her car -- no -- she will not be
going to the theatre.
(she turns)

Pimenov (at heart a clown) makes a grand comedy bow. He will
deliberately try to tease Madam out of her mood.

She glances at him, without smiling, crosses to the dressing-
table and sits.

PIMENOV
It is time for the performance.

GRUSINSKAYA
(under her breath)
The performance -- the performance --
the performance.
(during this scene
the orchids fall to
the floor)

It is a hysterical out-burst. It is not a woman who is just
temperamental, it is something deeper than that. She is very
near a nervous breakdown. We, the audience, must feel with
her a revulsion against the word performance.

PIMENOV
(tenderly -- as he
touches her shoulder
gently)
Poor little Lisevata -- she still
has her stage frights -- it will
pass.

Pimenov kneels by Grusinskaya -- he is chafing her hands, he
attempts to soothe her.

Now Grusinskaya draws her hands suddenly away.

GRUSINSKAYA
It is not stage fright -- it's
something more --

PIMENOV
(tenderly)
What -- what is it? Last night...

GRUSINSKAYA
Last night?... There was no applause.

PIMENOV
(quickly)
There was -- there was.

GRUSINSKAYA
That theatre -- half empty -- dancing
for those few -- I was frantic -- I
finished -- the last beat and...
(she reclines her
head as the swan
finishing the dance)
...I waited -- I listened -- but the
applause didn't come -- nothing. A
man in the box -- and just the claques
behind -- it is passed, Pimenov. We
are dead -- it's finished.

There is a sudden knocking at the door.

PIMENOV
Meierheim --

The door opens suddenly. Meierheim bursts into the room.

MEIERHEIM
What is this that you have cancelled
your car? Who am I that I should
wait like a fool at the door? And
here on a whim, you cancel your car.
Have you forgotten there is a
performance? Do you know the time?
Or, are we all mad? Am I your
manager?... Have we a contract? Have
we obligations? Am I blind?
(glances at his watch)
...Or is that the time?

GRUSINSKAYA
I'm cancelling the engagement.

MEIERHEIM
Oh!

Business of Pimenov signaling to him.

MEIERHEIM
Oh! Madam is cancelling the
engagement. Madam has chosen a funny
time for such a funny joke. Ha, ha,
ha -- hurry, come on. Tonight --
there's a line in front of the theatre
since six o'clock. The house is jammed
to the roof.

GRUSINSKAYA
The house is not full -- Is it really
full?

MEIERHEIM
Packed to the ceiling. Hurry -- get
dressed. And what an audience -- the
French Ambassador -- American
Millionaires -- Princess Ratzville --
er -- er --

GRUSINSKAYA
(to Suzette)
Oh -- but it can't be.

SUZETTE
Oh, come, Madam -- please come.
(she holds up her
frock)

GRUSINSKAYA
(changed mood)
All right, Suzette -- quickly --
hurry.

PIMENOV
We will wait.

MEIERHEIM
You are late. Hurry.

Meierheim goes over to telephone, he picks up receiver and
says:

MEIERHEIM
Tell Madam Grusinskaya's chauffeur
to bring the car.

Show few feet of Grusinskaya getting dressed.

CUT TO:

BY ELEVATOR

Pimenov and Meierheim.

Meierheim is pushing the bell.

PIMENOV
How is the house?

MEIERHEIM
Terrible. After this, no more ballets
for me. Jazz --
(snaps his fingers)
Just jazz.

PIMENOV
If the house is empty again, I don't
know --

MEIERHEIM
When she gets her paint on and hears
the music -- she'll be all right. I
know these people.

They are walking towards Kringelein's room. They are pacing
rather like men who walk the deck on a liner. They turn almost
together, but when they turn back past the CAMERA the CAMERA
PROCEEDS on into Kringelein's room. The CAMERA ENTERS THE
ROOM to a burst of laughter. Champagne bottles open, caviar,
smoke, etc.

In the room are the Doctor, Kringelein, the Baron, Flaemmchen,
and a very fat waiter -- comedian.

KRINGELEIN
You may laugh. Caviar and champagne
may mean nothing to you, but to me --
they mean a great deal. You see, I'm
ill and all of a sudden I got a fear
of missing life. I don't want to
miss life -- do you understand?

FLAEMMCHEN
You are funny. You speak of life as
if it were a train you wanted to
catch.

KRINGELEIN
Yes -- and for me, it's going to
leave at any minute. Let's drink.

The Baron offers Flaemmchen a glass of champagne. She shakes
her head.

KRINGELEIN
I'm sure this beautiful room must
appeal to your taste -- distinctive,
don't you think? Velvet upholstery --
'A-number one'. I'm in the textile
trade and I know.
(he has a slight case
of hiccups from the
champagne. He touches
the drapes)
And these are real silk drapes.

FLAEMMCHEN
(amusedly)
Silk -- think of that -- silk --
they are, too.

KRINGELEIN
(who hasn't stopped
talking)
Have you seen the bathroom? -- Hot
and cold running water -- You see, I
can get a bath whenever I like.

At that moment Preysing's voice is heard calling to the Floor
Clerk.

PREYSING
The stenographer!

Flaemmchen, hearing this, turns and looks off, apparently
through the door. Her manner changes, she puts down her glass.

FLAEMMCHEN
Her master's voice!
(turns to Baron)
I must go now -- goodbye -- thanks.

KRINGELEIN
Oh, don't go.

FLAEMMCHEN
I'm engaged for the evening.

KRINGELEIN
Oh, can anyone engage you for the
evening?

FLAEMMCHEN
To take dictation -- a Mr. Preysing --
(to Baron)
Goodbye, you -- tomorrow at five
o'clock.
(she is moving out)

Kringelein's optimism has left him for a moment, he stands
looking out of door undecided, he is drooped suddenly, as
though years had returned to him.

BARON
What's the matter, Mr. Kringelein?

KRINGELEIN
(to himself)
General Director Preysing!
(possibly he turns to
Baron)
Baron, when I was sixteen years old,
I started as an office boy in that
man's factory --

BARON
Then you know him?

KRINGELEIN
Do I know him -- I know him through
and through.

They start to leave. Oh, gentlemen, please don't go.

BARON
I must -- I hope to see you again,
Mr. Kringelein.

Baron leaves.

KRINGELEIN
You will stay, Doctor -- if you have
nothing better to do?

DOCTOR
I have nothing better to do, Mr.
Kringelein.

They move into the room.

CUT TO:

NO SCENES: 24 and 25 Sequence omitted from original script.

NEAR ELEVATOR

Pimenov and Meierheim are standing there.

Meierheim is pushing the elevator button.

The Baron stands near and pauses, he is now a changed man.
He looks off as he hears the voice of Grusinskaya, off in
the distance.

Grusinskaya's Voice Hurry, Suzette.

GRUSINSKAYA

Shot from the Baron's angle. Grusinskaya is sweeping down
the corridor, followed by Suzette.

CUT BACK TO:

BARON, PIMENOV AND MEIERHEIM

BARON
Perhaps you could present me now,
Mr. Pimenov.

PIMENOV
Please, Baron -- forgive me -- not
now -- here she is.

Grusinskaya sweeps into scene.

The Baron leans forward quickly and pushes the bell with a
glance at her.

They look at each other. He fixes his eyes on her
characteristically. She glances at him. This is the first
time they have met in the picture.

She is impatient. As if to break an awkward silence, she
turns to Suzette.

GRUSINSKAYA
My coat.

Suzette is carrying the coat over the pearls. As she takes
the coat off her arm, Grusinskaya glances down at the jewel
case.

GRUSINSKAYA
Suzette -- I told you not to bring
the pearls. I will not wear them
tonight.

MEIERHEIM
Why not?

GRUSINSKAYA
Take them back, Suzette.

MEIERHEIM
You haven't time.

Suzette hesitates.

GRUSINSKAYA
Hurry, Suzette.

MEIERHEIM
Such nonsense.

Suzette toddles off with the pearls.

The elevator opens, collects its passengers, all except the
Baron and descends.

FLASH IN

A shot of Grusinskaya's eyes as she goes down, glancing up.

FLASH IN

A shot of the reverse of him looking down.

The Baron pauses, hesitates, thinks. We are interested in
his action. For the first time he becomes furtive.

HOTEL LOBBY - FROM ELEVATORS

Music swells up from the Yellow Room. A great deal of noise,
confusion and activity as the elevator stops to emit
Grusinskaya, followed by Pimenov, Meierheim and some other
people who are rather excited to be in the elevator with the
great Grusinskaya.

MEIERHEIM
(off scene)
The car for Madam Grusinskaya.

The bellboy hears it and passes the word around. It seems to
be echoed through the lobby.

People turn, as Grusinskaya's spirit seems to rise with the
attention she is getting.

THE CAMERA precedes her through the revolving door, as she
sweeps outside of the hotel.

The Baron's chauffeur, Schweinke, is seen to watch her go.
He looks furtively around and enters the hotel.

CUT BACK TO:

UPPER CORRIDOR - CLOSEUP OF BARON

As he watches Suzette returning from Grusinskaya's room. She
is about to push lift button - then decides to run downstairs.

IMPORTANT CLOSEUP OF BARON

FADE OUT:

END OF SEQUENCE "#1"

PREYSING'S ROOM

Zinnowitz and Preysing are standing by door.

PREYSING
No news from Manchester yet -- Do
you think we ought to postpone the
conference?

ZINNOWITZ
Good heavens no. That'd create the
very worst impression. You must be
optimistic. You must convince them.
You know as well as I do that the
merger must go through.

PREYSING
Yes -- the merger must go through --
But I am used to making my deals on
a solid basis. I am not a liar. I am
an honest business man -- a good
husband and father -- I have a sense
of honor -- I have nothing to conceal.
I couldn't live happily otherwise.

ZINNOWITZ
Well, don't get excited about it. We
agreed that the merger with the
Saxonia people must go through.

PREYSING
I want to dictate my statement for
tomorrow. I can't speak without notes.
I like to have things down before me
in black and white.

ZINNOWITZ
I'll see you in the morning then, at
the conference. Everything'll be all
right, Preysing... Don't worry.
Goodnight.

PREYSING
Good night.

Zinnowitz leaves.

SEQUENCE "#2"

FADE IN ON BLACKNESS OF PREYSING'S ROOM

We hear the distant voice of Preysing and the keys of the
typewriter rattling. The reason for the blackness is that
Preysing's back is flat into the camera. His hands are behind
his back and his fat fingers are moving restlessly. It is an
odd effect. We don't know quite what it is.

PREYSING'S VOICE
Both parties have fully agreed that
this merger can result only in mutual
advantages.

Preysing moves forward showing that we are in Preysing's
room.

The change of light shows us plainly the time lapse.

Flaemmchen is seated at a small table typing. Preying strides
forward As he strides he says:

PREYSING
Moreover --

FLAEMMCHEN
(repeating)
Moreover --

Preysing paces the room.

PREYSING
(repeating)
Moreover --
(he pauses, thinking.
Picks up telephone
quickly -- into
telephone)
Is there a telegram for me yet?...
Oh -- when it does, send it up.

During this, Flaemmchen, who is tired sits back and rubs her
fingers that have been over-worked. She glances at her wrist-
watch.

Preysing comes and stands behind Flaemmchen.

PREYSING
Now, where was I?
(he looks over the
sheet in her
typewriter --
accidentally his arm
touches her neck)
Oh -- sorry.
(he puts his cigar in
his mouth and walks
away. As he walks
away)
Where was I?

As he turns, he catches a down shot on her from behind as
she stretches back showing her busts. Seeing his face looking
down on her she pulls herself together and seats herself at
attention.

FLAEMMCHEN
Moreover...

PREYSING
Moreover...

It seems a silly kind of lull.

PREYSING
Do you work in Justice Zinnowitz'
office?

FLAEMMCHEN
No -- only occasional jobs.
(she yawns suddenly)

PREYSING
Tired?

FLAEMMCHEN
You pay me.

PREYSING
You're a very unusual stenographer --

FLAEMMCHEN
Moreover...

PREYSING
Moreover...
(as he paces the room,
it is obvious that
he is trying to
collect his thoughts)

She looks at him, waits a moment and then begins
characteristically to, change the sheet of paper.

FLAEMMCHEN
I don't see why it's unusual for a
stenographer to be pretty -- if she
does her work well, -- seems so silly.
I don't know why they don't like
girls like me in offices. Personally,
I hate offices -- I'd much rather be
in the movies.

PREYSING
Movies?

FLAEMMCHEN
Yes, I photograph very well. Look --

She tosses magazine -- as if it were nothing at all over to
him.

He looks down at it without touching it.

PREYSING
What is this?

FLAEMMCHEN
I got ten marks for that.

He picks it up.

PREYSING
You...

FLAEMMCHEN
(without looking up)
Me.

As he looks at picture -- he lowers his voice two notes.

PREYSING
You...

FLAEMMCHEN
(reading)
Moreover...

PREYSING
(quickly)
What?

FLAEMMCHEN
(reading)
Only in mutual advantages -- moreover.

PREYSING
What brown hands you have.

FLAEMMCHEN
That's from skiing.

PREYSING
Skiing?
(he holds her hands)

FLAEMMCHEN
(natural -- unabashed)
Yes... A man I know took me to
Switzerland last month...

He drops her hand suddenly.

PREYSING
A man? -- To Switzerland? -- That
must have been nice -- for him.

FLAEMMCHEN
(reading)
Only in mutual advantages --
moreover...

Preysing paces the room trying to get his thoughts back to
the work in hand.

PREYSING
Moreover... He was a lucky man --
that man.

FLAEMMCHEN
Perhaps.
(she waits at attention)

He paces back and forth again.

PREYSING
Don't misunderstand me. I'm a married
man -- with grownup daughters. Uh --

FLAEMMCHEN
Moreover -- Do you mind if I smoke?
(she takes cigarette)
I went to Florence once, too.

PREYSING
With the same friend?

By this time she is smoking her cigarette.

FLAEMMCHEN
(without looking at
him)
No.

PREYSING
(quickly)
Moreover, the possibility of the
successful termination of negotiations
now pending with the Manchester Cotton
Company...

FLAEMMCHEN
Not too quickly.

PREYSING
What?

FLAEMMCHEN
You're a little too fast.

PREYSING
Can't you understand me?

FLAEMMCHEN
I understand you perfectly.

PREYSING
Have you got it now?

FLAEMMCHEN
(typing)
Cotton Company --

PREYSING
Should throw a great weight into the
balance...

FLAEMMCHEN
(as he turns his back
looks at him
significantly)
...weight into the balance...

There is a sudden knock at the door.

PREYSING
Come in.

Boy enters with telegram.

BOY
Telegram for Mr. Preysing.

With almost hysterical speed, Preysing snatches the telegram --
opens it. Flaemmchen powders her nose.

IMPORTANT CLOSEUP OF PREYSING

it is bad news. He wipes the perspiration from his forehead.

PREYSING
Oh -- oh.
(he throws the telegram
away from him, onto
her desk. Paces the
room.)

Flaemmchen, believing the telegram to be something that she
must copy, picks it up quite naturally and reads it.

FLAEMMCHEN
Deal with Manchester Cotton Company
definitely off.

Preysing turns and snatches the telegram from her.

FLAEMMCHEN
Sorry.

Preysing paces the room with the telegram.

Flaemmchen rises, stretches. Quite naturally she glances at
the pictures on Preysing's dressing-table.

FLAEMMCHEN
How nice -- your daughters?

PREYSING
My daughters -- yes, my daughters.
(he is talking more
to himself)

FLAEMMCHEN
Is that Mrs. Preysing.

PREYSING
(to himself)
Definitely off.

FLAEMMCHEN
Oh -- too bad. Did you quarrel?
(she is looking at
picture of Mrs.
Preysing)

PREYSING
(turns, speaks quickly --
definitely)
That'll be all -- be here tomorrow
at nine o'clock.
(he turns, goes out
onto balcony with
telegram)

Flaemmchen, delighted and with alacrity, crosses, piles up
her papers and is prepared to leave.

CUT TO:

FLASH OF CORRIDOR

Trim Flaemmchen out of Preysing's room. Take her down to
elevator.

At the same time, CAMERA PANS OVER and shows the Baron's
chauffeur knocking at the Baron's door.

BARON'S VOICE
(calling)
Come in!

Trim the chauffeur into the Baron's room.

BARON'S ROOM

Baron is busy changing his clothes. Chauffeur steps in, he
closes the door behind him and stands there with an
inquisitive look.

CHAUFFEUR
You are late -- the dancer's gone to
the theatre.

BARON
(very nonchalantly)
Well?

CHAUFFEUR
She's gone to the theatre -- don't
you know?

BARON
(very nonchalantly)
Yes.

CHAUFFEUR
(ready to explode)
And what are you going to do?

BARON
The pearls are in her room.

CHAUFFEUR
(threateningly)
Now listen to me. The others are
getting suspicious of you. I was on
the telephone to Amsterdam today,
they think you're scared.

BARON
I've been careful, I've been waiting
my chance.

CHAUFFEUR
You've been waiting your chance.
You're too much of a gentleman --
that's the trouble with you.

BARON
I told you I'll get the pearls
tonight.

CHAUFFEUR
Need any help?

BARON
No.

CHAUFFEUR
Have you got that skeleton key?

He takes the skeleton key out of his pocket and produces it
to the Baron.

BARON
No --

CHAUFFEUR
Why?

BARON
The floor clerk is out there in the
corridor -- she sees everything ---

CHAUFFEUR
(contemptuously)
I could take care of her.

BARON
How?

CHAUFFEUR
Chloroform on a handkerchief from
behind -- while you...

BARON
No -- no -- no -- no...

CHAUFFEUR
Why?

BARON
Poor girl -- chloroform would give
her a rotten headache... I know -- I
had it in the war. Besides, she's
very pretty -- not young but --

CHAUFFEUR
You're no good for this business.
It's just a joke to you...

BARON
(swings suddenly on
him)
I don't like your tone.

CHAUFFEUR
(comes up to him --
face to face)
No --

Baron is suddenly seized with uncontrollable temper -- twists
his wrists -- backs him to door, speaks quietly.

BARON
Get out and leave it to me... be
ready to leave on the night train
for Amsterdam...

CHAUFFEUR
With the pearls?

BARON
With the pearls --

The Chauffeur leaves.

The moment he is gone -- Baron looks the door -- business ad
lib.

Crosses to window.

FACADE OF HOTEL

The Baron peeps out onto balcony -- it seems to be clear. He
proceeds along and peeps into Preysing's room. Preysing is
apparently in the bathroom. Baron skips nimbly past the room.

Working at thrill of pass through to Grusinskaya's room.

GRUSINSKAYA'S BALCONY

Baron is pretty shaken by jump.

CUT TO:

GRUSINSKAYA'S ROOM

Darkness -- light from transom and building opposite.

Business of finding key and getting pearls. INTERCUT Preysing
coming out onto his balcony, bringing out with him, loud
speaker of radio -- which announces noisily as follows:

LOUD SPEAKER
'You are listening to the music of
the Eastman Jazz Band, in the famous
Yellow Room of the Grand Hotel.'

CUT TO:

GRUSINSKAYA'S ROOM

Baron starts suddenly -- when he hears voice and with pearls
in his hand, looks cautiously out of window -- only to see:

CUT TO:

SHOT FROM HIS ANGLE ONTO PREYSING'S BALCONY:

Preysing seating himself upon his balcony -- Radio loud
speaker seen. Possibly Preysing commences dinner scene
bullying waiter.

GRUSINSKAYA'S BALCONY

The Baron knows he is trapped, if he jumps onto Preysing's
balcony, Preysing is the man that will cause the alarm.

Quickly he moves across the room -- tries the door -- it is
locked securely. He looks for skeleton key and then remembers
refusing it from the chauffeur. He is trapped in an absurd
way.

As he moves back from the door, he knocks the telephone off
of the table. He watches it for a moment, realizing that the
operator must now know that there is someone in Grusinskaya's
room.

He picks up the telephone, replaces the receiver, wipes finger
prints off with his handkerchief.

He is moving back to window when telephone starts to ring
suddenly. The thought crosses his mind they they will want
to know who is in the room. He lets the telephone ring.
Crosses to the door again.

Above the din of the telephone we hear the chambermaid's
voice singing an absurd song.

He listens. She is coming in.

The key turns in the door.

Quickly he hides behind the curtains.

Slowly and amusingly the chambermaid, tired and dragging,
enters the room.

He is looking for an opportunity to dash through the door.
After all, this maid should be an easy person to get around.
We have a feeling he wishes to dash through the door.

The chambermaid might be singing the same tune that we hear
from Preysing's radio.

The telephone commences ringing. Chambermaid does not answer
it but continues her duties.

At last, because of the noise of the telephone, she picks it
up and speaks.

CHAMBERMAID
No -- no -- there is no one here.
(she replaces the
receiver)

At that moment, the Inspectress, a large stout woman, appears
at the open door.

INSPECTRESS
(to Chambermaid)
You're late... What have you been
doing?

CHAMBERMAID
(grumbling)
Everyone -- all the time says, 'Come
back - come back.' They won't get
out of their rooms.

The Inspectress, in a very businesslike way, proceeds around
the room, coming nearer and nearer the Baron. She is looking
at ashtrays and running her fingers over the woodwork looking
for dust. She tries the door to the next room, to see if it
is locked.

Telephone bell rings again.

Inspectress picks it up quickly.

INSPECTRESS
No, Madame Grusinskaya is not here...
The Western Theater?... No...

Suddenly, out of scene, we hear the voice of Suzette.

Suzette is calling out to the night clerk in the passage.

SUZETTE'S VOICE
Have you seen Madame?

CLERK'S VOICE
(replying)
Isn't she at the theatre?

Suzette comes in and hurries to telephone.

SUZETTE
Hello, hello, Mr. Pimenov? Yes...
Mr. Pimenov, have they found her?...
No, she is not here... Yes, I'm at
the hotel.

INTERCUT

With the Baron watching.

GRUSINSKAYA'S BALCONY

During this action the Inspectress has waven the chambermaid
out of the room. Business ad lib.

Meierheim enters, he has heard the word 'Pimenov' on the
telephone -- he takes the receiver from Suzette.

MEIERHEIM
(into telephone)
Pimenov?... What's happening?... No,
I haven't found her. Is Desprez
dancing?... How is it?... Oh, all
right. Keep the show going.
(bangs down receiver)
Wait till I see her, she'll pay for
this -- this little trick is going
to cost Grusinskaya a suit for breach
of contract.

SUZETTE
Madame is ill -- her nerves...

MEIERHEIM
Her nerves... What about my nerves?...
Who is she anyway? Where does she
think she is -- Russia? Those days
have passed.

He turns and sees Grusinskaya standing at the door. She is
in costume, very pale, very beautiful. Her coat, over one
shoulder, is ragging, she lets it drop and moves slowly into
the center of the room. Her hair, dressed for the dance,
make-up is on her face -- she is breathless.

SUZETTE
Madame --

MEIERHEIM
Well?

GRUSINSKAYA
I want to be alone.

The other women in the room draw out, leaving Suzette to
pick up the robe that has fallen to the floor.

MEIERHEIM
Where have you been?

SUZETTE
Should I -- Does madame wish...

GRUSINSKAYA
Suzette, please go, I want to be
alone.

Suzette obediently crosses to door and pauses on threshold,
waiting for Meierheim.

Meierheim approaches Grusinskaya.

MEIERHEIM
I suppose I can cancel the Vienna
engagement.

GRUSINSKAYA
I wish to be alone.

MEIERHEIM
You'll be very much alone, my dear
madame. This is the end.
(he stamps out)

Suzette, with a frightened look through the door, closes it
on Meierheim's exit.

DURING THIS SCENE, INTERCUT SHOTS OF BARON.

It is some time before Grusinskaya moves. She crosses to
door -- turns the key -- takes the key out of the lock and
throws it away from her -- out upon the floor. She crosses
slowly to the mirror, regards herself, silently. We hear the
strains from Preysing's radio playing a light Viennese waltz.

Grusinskaya begins suddenly to sob.

FLASH OF BARON

Watching her.

GRUSINSKAYA

Quite suddenly -- as if with resolution she begins to undress.
Then she becomes weary again.

With a garment in her hand, she moves slowly toward the
curtain -- where the Baron is standing.

BARON

We see him tense himself.

GRUSINSKAYA

She drops the garment listlessly to the floor -- moves out
of scene.

CLOSEUP OF BARON

He peeps around the curtains.

CUT TO:

GRUSINSKAYA

She is in a thin robe. She sits before mirror -- looks
steadily at her face. Her head goes down suddenly in her
hands and we hear her say:

GRUSINSKAYA
The end -- over -- finished --

Suddenly she moves quickly across the room. Goes to bathroom.

Baron half starts out toward door. He watches -- darts across
the room as if towards the door. He hears her coming and
darts quickly into the half open door of the closet.

She re-enters -- carrying a glass of water. She crosses,
places the glass down beside the bed -- her movements are
quick and furtive -- then she crosses, picks up the telephone --
asks for the theatre.

GRUSINSKAYA
The Western Theatre --

She leaves receiver down -- crosses quickly to mirror --
stands there and brushes back her hair -- crosses back to
telephone speaks:

GRUSINSKAYA
Western Theatre?

She glances up at the clock.

GRUSINSKAYA
The stage -- Mr. Pimonov -- the ballet
master... Grusinskaya -- hurry --
hurry.

Again she puts the receiver down -- picking up a pencil she
commences hastily to scribble a note. She writes frantically.
Her other hand goes up and picks up the receiver.

GRUSINSKAYA
Yes -- yes, I'm waiting.

She finishes the note -- commences suddenly to speak into
the telephone --

GRUSINSKAYA
Hello, Pimenov? -- I'm at the hotel.
I couldn't go on -- I couldn't...
No, no don't --
(long pause)
...Just alone... Good night, good
night, my dear -- goodbye... Pimenov,
how is it going, badly?... Uh?...
Who's dancing?... Desprez?... Oh --
and how is it?... Oh, -- oh, I see --
they didn't miss me?... They didn't
miss me.
(she lets her hand
drop with the receiver
and goes on talking
into the air)
They didn't miss me -- good night,
Pimenov...

She is about to replace the receiver. She sits with it in
her hand, unreplaced.

The music has stopped. The room is strangely silent. Behind
her the Baron peers from the closet.

Her head sinks down upon her hands.

A funny, singing noise comes from the telephone. She lifts
the receiver to her ear. In a very strange voice, the voice
of Opehlia, she speaks:

GRUSINSKAYA
(with great humility)
Oh -- I'm sorry, yes... I have
finished.
(she replaces the
receiver)

The foregoing scene is much better played than described. It
is in fact, ballet.

Quite calmly, Grusinskaya finishes the notes on the table.
She folds it up and places it in a prominent place on the
table, or hangs it over the telephone.

She crosses to the window pulls back the curtains -- the
Baron has been hiding behind a few minutes before.

We see the Baron watching. He glances at the door quickly.
"No, there is not time." She is returning calmly. She crosses
to the dressing table and takes the veronal out of a drawer.
She looks at it thoughtfully, her lips are trembling a little.
She moves to the radiator as if to seek warmth.

She sinks into a chair and her head droops over her folded
hands which contain the veronal, she seems to pray.

The Baron comes from the closet -- now is his chance, he
looks at the door but can't make it. Looks on the floor for
the key which Grusinskaya has previously thrown there, his
eyes fall upon the note on the telephone -- he reads it.

It is a death farewell note to Suzette -- do not insert it.

At this moment she has finished, the Baron returns to his
hiding place. She makes the sign of a cross and goes to her
bed.

She looks around nervously, apprehensively -- like a deer
who has heard something, then reassured. She places the
veronal on the night table beside the glass of water. She is
quiet and deliberate. She arranges the pillows under her
head and lies down. She reaches for the bottle of veronal
and empties it generously in her hand. She has to lean away
upon one elbow, from the Baron's position, in order to balance
herself.

The Baron steps like a cat from his hiding place. He goes to
the bedside noiselessly and stands there.

She reaches for the glass-her hand stretches out for the
glass. The Baron takes her wrist suddenly.

She turns quickly looking at him. The glass falls to the
floor with a crash and breaks. As she moves, the veronal
falls out of her hands upon the bed. She struggles up to a
sitting position.

BARON
Please, do not be alarmed, Madam.

She glances up at him. She is bewildered. She seems to be
coming out of a trance. Again she wants to jump from the
bed.

BARON
Careful -- there's broken glass on
the floor.

Now she becomes conscious of almost nakedness. She draws her
kimono tightly around her, glances across the wide expanse
of bed. We see her consider passing over that way, but she
is now a woman again -- a woman of the earth -- it would be
a silly movement.

BARON
There.
(takes a pillow from
the bed throws it
upon the floor over
the glass, steps
back)

She gets up quickly and crosses, putting on her robe which
was lying across the back of a chair.

Her first movement is not one of alarm but of -- shame. She
draws her robe more closely around her and looks at the Baron
puzzled. She thinks, dreamily, "What is this?" She glances
back at the veronal and the bed showing us plainly that this
man must have watched her preparation for bed. We get a sense
of relief with her. She is trembling.

The Baron has controlled his nerves perfectly. He senses his
danger. He is caught red-handed with five hundred thousand
marks worth of pearls in his pocket. He is wondering if she
will ring the bell. For an instant he thinks of escape. He
could dash for the balcony. He could strike her dead or
silence her with threats. There is in the room an intoxicating
sense of romance and danger. (It should be in the scene.)

BARON
Please do not be frightened, Madam.

GRUSINSKAYA
(after a silence)
What do you want here?

BARON
Nothing -- only to be here.

GRUSINSKAYA
Why do you hide in my room?

BARON
But surely you must know -- because
I love you.

GRUSINSKAYA
Because you love me -- you love me?

She looks at him for a few moments and then suddenly she
throws herself upon the bed and begins to weep more and more
passionately.

BARON
(going over to her)
Poor little Grusinskaya! Does it do
you good to cry? Are you afraid?
Shall I go?

GRUSINSKAYA
I was so alone -- always alone --
and suddenly you were there and said
that.
(sitting up)
No. I am not afraid. It is strange.

BARON
Don't cry -- it tears my heart to
see you sob like that.

GRUSINSKAYA
(regaining control)
Nerves -- just nerves. You must
forgive me. I have had a bad evening.
I am very tired. Do you know what it
is to be tired -- tired of a routine
existence?

BARON
I'm afraid not -- I usually do just
what I feel like doing at the moment.

A look in his eyes reminds her of the strangeness of the
situation. She rises with returning dignity and pulls her
robe around her -- she is becoming the Grusinskaya of Imperial
Russia; she is the woman Grand Dukes have fought for. She
sweeps across the room.

GRUSINSKAYA
So you feel like coming into a lady's
room -- and you come... What now?

BARON
(following her)
I'd like to smoke a cigarette.

GRUSINSKAYA
Certainly.

She gets her cigarette box from the writing table and holds
it out to him. He takes a cigarette and lights it. She watches
him curiously. She smiles, as she watches him greedily inhale
the smoke. She crosses and sits before her looking glass.
She brushes her hair back and powders her face. She looks
into the mirror, we feel that she has regained a desire to
live. He crosses and looks at her in the mirror. He smiles.

GRUSINSKAYA
Why do you look at me like that?

BARON
I did not know you were so
beautiful... and --

GRUSINSKAYA
(bitterly)
And then --?

BARON
No irony. You're so appealing -- so
soft -- so tired. I feel like taking
you in my arms and not letting
anything more happen to you -- ever.

GRUSINSKAYA
(involuntarily closing
her eyes)
And -- and --

BARON
How tired you are!

GRUSINSKAYA
Yes -- tired...

BARON
So alone.

GRUSINSKAYA
Alone. All alone.
(whispers in Russian)
Oh, you strange -- strange creature.

BARON
You mustn't talk Russian to me.

GRUSINSKAYA
Strange man...

BARON
Am I quite strange to you?

GRUSINSKAYA
Not quite strange now. It is as if I
had been expecting you. You know,
once when the Grand Duke was alive,
I found a man hiding in my room -- a
young officer --

BARON
And...?

GRUSINSKAYA
He disappeared. Later he was found
dead.

BARON
I never knew it was so dangerous to
hide in a woman's room when she's
alone.
(he embraces her)

GRUSINSKAYA
Go away. Who are you --?

BARON
A man who could love -- that is all,
who has forgotten everything else
for you.

GRUSINSKAYA
You could love me. It is so long
since I have heard that word. Nobody
has loved me for a long time. It is
so icy-cold to be famous. One is so
cruelly alone. How is it that you --
Let me look at you. Your hands. Your
eyes. Why could you love me?

BARON
I saw you just now -- then I saw you
cry -- and now I see you in the mirror --
Grusinskaya...

GRUSINSKAYA
Grusinskaya... Oh -- oh if you knew
how I slaved and slaved for
Grusinskaya -- for the success of
Grusinskaya -- for the triumph of
Grusinskaya... and what is she now?
Just someone who has found that on
the day success ceases life ceases --
Are you listening to me -- Do you
understand? -- I want you to
understand.

BARON
Yes -- I do understand.

GRUSINSKAYA
I think you must go now -- the key
is on the floor.

BARON
I'm not going -- You know I'm not
going -- Let me stay here?

GRUSINSKAYA
I want to be alone.

BARON
That is not so -- you don't want to
be alone.
(he looks back at the
bed as if remembering
the suicide.)

GRUSINSKAYA
I want to be alone --

BARON
No -- You don't want to be alone at
all -- You were in despair before --
If I left you, you'd feel worse than
you did before, You must not be alone --
You mustn't cry -- you must forget...
Tell me that I can stay with you --
tell me.

GRUSINSKAYA
(whispering)
Just for a minute then.

Outside the distant noise of Kringelein is heard --

BARON
What? Say it again -- I didn't hear.

She whispers.

GRUSINSKAYA
You -- man...

The way she says it, the word goes home. It hurts him. She
has looked into his eyes for a moment with a strangely melting
and almost happy expression. She gets up suddenly.

(NOTE: The other side of the bed -- not where the glass is)

She reaches with her feet for her slippers. She puts one on.
She can't find the other.

Business as he gets other slipper for her.

He kisses her ankle and looks up at her. She smiles down.

GRUSINSKAYA
Thank you -- you are gallant.
(she turns, her mood
has changed)
What a sentimental scene. Grusinskaya
weeping is a sight worth seeing. It
is many years since she did such a
thing... You frightened me -- badly.
You're responsible for this -- painful
scene.

He watches her.

The sound of her own voice reassures her. She is generating
warmth. Her cry has done her good, she speaks quickly,
volubly.

GRUSINSKAYA
The stage frays one's nerves... the
discipline -- it's so exacting.
Discipline means doing what you don't
want to do and take no pleasure in
doing. Do you know what I mean? Have
you ever experienced the weariness
that comes from discipline?

BARON
I? -- Oh, no. I do only what I take
pleasure in doing.

Grusinskaya turns, she is graceful again.

GRUSINSKAYA
I see -- you do only what you take
pleasure in doing. You take pleasure
in coming into a woman's bedroom and
you come. You take pleasure in a
dangerous climb onto a balcony, so
you do it... And what is your pleasure
now?

BARON
(naive as he says
frankly)
I should like to smoke.

She rises. She had expected something else. His reply strikes
her as chivalrous and considerate. She crosses to the writing
table brings back her little cigarette box which she holds
out to him. He takes a cigarette and lights it. She watches
him curiously. She smiles, as she watches him greedily inhale
the smoke. She crosses and sits before her looking glass.
She brushes her hair back and powders her face. She looks
into the mirror, we feel that she has regained a desire to
live. He crosses and looks at her in the mirror, he smiles.

GRUSINSKAYA
Why do you smile?

BARON
Because I can see something in the
mirror that you cannot. My dear --
(he pauses suddenly)

GRUSINSKAYA
What can you see?

BARON
You are beautiful!

GRUSINSKAYA
No.

BARON
Beautiful but so sad. I did not know
it was so dangerous to look into a
woman's bedroom.

Suddenly he stoops, takes her shoulder in his hands and kisses
it. A long tender and sincere embrace.

Her eyes close. A tremor passes through her. Suddenly his
whole being is aware of her. She turns, rises and disengages
herself.

GRUSINSKAYA
I think you had better go now. The
key is on the floor.

He glances back. He speaks suddenly with an air of command.

BARON
I'm not going... You know that I'm
not going... Do you think I could
leave you alone here? After that --?

GRUSINSKAYA
What?

BARON
The veronal -- you. I'm going to
stay here with you.

GRUSINSKAYA
I want to be alone.

BARON
That is not the truth.
(he catches her wrists)
You do not want to be alone -- you're
afraid of being alone -- I know you're
afraid. I know you. You were
desperate, just now, if I go away
you'll be more desperate than ever.
Say I am to stay with you... say it.
(he almost shakes her)

Her head falls slowly on his breast.

GRUSINSKAYA
(whispers)
For just a minute then.
(she pulls away,
crosses the room,
quickly to the door,
with almost a cry.
She looks around for
the key to the door)
No -- oh, no!

He crosses quickly to her and holds her in his arms.

BARON
Just for a minute, Grusinskaya --

Outside the distant noise of Kringelein and the doctor.

FRONT ON SHOT OF KRINGELEIN

approaching the CAMERA with the Doctor.

They are returning from the bar and are passing Grusinskaya's
room. THE CAMERA precedes them. The Doctor is
characteristically drunk. He is silent, tense, cynical. A
distinct contrast to Kringelein, whose soul is warmed for
the first time by alcohol.

Kringelein's hat, the same, eccentric one, is twisted upon
his head jauntily. The carnation is in his buttonhole.

THE CAMERA backs into Kringelein's room and pauses, because
the Doctor has paused at the door.

KRINGELEIN
Oh, but Doctor. Isn't this wonderful.
To live -- to live -- in the Grand
Hotel.

DOCTOR
(with a deprecating
gesture)
The Grand Hotel.

KRINGELEIN
Oh, but Doctor. The music -- the
champagne -- girls when they dance --
all the shining ice in those big
silver things -- That's life --

DOCTOR
Life! -- Mr. Kringelein, you are
drunk -- good night.
(he leaves)

KRINGELEIN
(to doctor)
But Doctor --

But the Doctor has gone.

Kringelein re-enters his beautiful room. He crosses to the
mirror, regards himself. Business ad lib.

He looks at himself in the mirror and raises his hat.
Imitating the doctor, he repeats:

KRINGELEIN
Mr. Kringelein -- you are drunk --
good night.

He puts his hat on the knob of the bed.

He takes off his coat, holds it up and carefully takes the
carnation out of his buttonhole. With the coat over his arm
and the carnation in his hand he looks around for a glass
and some water which he sees standing on the night table by
his bed.

He puts the carnation in the glass, having filled it with
water and then his eyes fall upon his small group of medicine
bottles.

His demeanor changes. He immediately becomes a thing of pain.

He glances at his watch -- it is long past his medicine time --
his spirit droops -- he might almost be in pain.

He picks up a small bottle and carefully counts eight drops
into the glass. He is about to take it, he smells it, a sudden
impulse of well-being surges over him. He flings the medicine
away.

With a great wave of optimism he commences to sing the song
that we have heard during the evening -- the chambermaid
song - the Preysing radio song -- the love song. He saunters
around the room, undressing.

DISSOLVE OUT:

DISSOLVE INTO PASSAGE

His voice is still heard in the passage.

Rows of shoes outside the doors. The dozing night clerk hears
the voice and looks up, startled.

DISSOLVE OUT:

DISSOLVE INTO A WATCHMAN

with his clock, hears the voice.

DISSOLVE OUT:

DISSOLVE INTO A CORNER OF DOCTOR'S ROOM

He is dozing in a chair with his clothes on. He looks up
suddenly, hearing the voice.

DISSOLVE OUT:

DISSOLVE INTO PREYSING'S ROOM

He is snoring. The distant voice disturbs him. He turns in
his sleep.

DISSOLVE OUT:

DISSOLVE INTO GRUSINSKAYA'S ROOM

A beautiful picture -- the distant voices -- shadows.

BARON'S VOICE
I've never been as happy.

GRU'S VOICE
What did you say?

BARON'S VOICE
I've never been as happy!

GRUSINSKAYA'S VOICE
Say it again -- say it!

BARON'S VOICE
I have never been so happy!

DISSOLVE OUT:

DISSOLVE INTO KRINGELEIN'S ROOM

He is now dressed in an absurd night dress. He crosses to
the bed, still singing, climbs into the huge bed -- the great
pillows. His hand goes out -- he pulls out the light. He
might be an Emperor as he turns with a happy, tired sigh.

DISTANT CLOCK CHIMES.

FADE OUT:

END OF SEQUENCE "#2"

SEQUENCE "#3"

FADE IN:

TELEPHONE ROOM

It is the first time we have seen it. There are about eight
girls very busy. Morning confusion. (parts to be written)

We pick up essential lines as we PAN DOWN SHOOTING AT THE
GIRL'S FACES, assuming the CAMERA to be the board.

GIRL ONE
Grand Hotel -- good morning -- no,
Baron von Gaigern's room does not
answer... Yes,... all right... Baron
von Gaigern's chauffeur calling.

CAMERA PANS TO:

GIRL THREE
Good morning, nine-thirty Doctor
Otternschlag... No, Doctor, no
messages... No, Doctor.

CAMERA PANS TO:

GIRL FIVE
Grand Hotel -- good morning... who
is calling Madam Grusinskaya?... Oh,
Mr. Pimenov. Madam Grusinskaya is
not to be disturbed, sir... no, sir...
yes, sir --

The word passes down repeated.

VOICE
Mr. Preysing's calls to one sixty
two for today.

CAMERA PANS TO:

GIRL EIGHT
-- good morning... Mr. Preysing --
(she plugs through)

CUT TO:

CONFERENCE ROOM

Telephone bell ringing.

General shot.

Gerstenkorn, an old business man and Doctor Waitz, counsel
for the Saxonia organization are sitting at a gree table,
smoking and waiting.

GERSTENKORN
(glances at watch)
Nine-thirty, Mr. Preysing keeps us
waiting.

SCHWEIMANN
(who has returned)
He likes to play the great man.

WAITZ
(glancing at market
report from table)
The Preysing stock is holding its
own today on the market.

SCHWEIMANN
Ask Preysing what it's costing him
to keep it up.

GERSTENKORN
And ask me what it's costing us to
hammer it down.

WAITZ
Exactly.

GERSTENKORN
If the Preysing people get the
Manchester contract, we shall
certainly merge with the Preysing
company -- but if they haven't they're
ruined -- Preysing will have to
declare himself.

WAITZ
Shhh -- here he is now.

The door opens and Flaemmchen enters. She is agreeably
surprised to see the room full of men. She likes men.

FLAEMMCHEN
(beams)
Good morning, gentlemen -- Mr.
Preysing will be here in a minute.

Business of Schweimann and Flaemmchen.

Gerstenkorn, making notes, glances at his watch again.

Door opens suddenly.

PREYSING
(enters)
Good morning, gentlemen.

MEN
Good morning.

PREYSING
Sorry I'm late, I've been waiting
for Justice Zinnowitz, my legal
advisor.

WAITZ
Oh -- ho -- you want legal aid against
us? -- The whole thing seems to me
to be very simple.

GERSTENKORN
Very simple -- I've always liked the
way you dressed, Preysing -- English,
isn't it?

PREYSING
(disturbed)
What?

GERSTENKORN
(quickly)
They turn out marvelous material in
Manchester.

PREYSING
Manchester -- yes. Yes, yes, they
do. Yes -- Now gentlemen shall we
begin at the beginning? -- Have we
cigars -- water and everything?

Flaemmchen, who has been busy preparing her little table for
work is seen in several CLOSEUPS:

SCHWEIMANN
(with a wink to
Gerstenkorn)
Manchester is a very interesting
city, don't you think so, Preysing?

PREYSING
(stalling)
Manchester -- yes -- yes. A man in
the textile industry naturally has
to know Manchester.

GERSTENKORN
There's a lot of business to be done
with the Manchester Cotton Company.
They've the whole English market
right in their hands. Have you any
connections with -- Manchester?

PREYSING
(quickly)
We have a good many connections in
England, naturally.

GERSTENKORN
I mean with the Manchester people?

PREYSING
(looking at Gerstenkorn
impudently)
We are here to discuss our merger.
Naturally I can make no statement at
this time. We must begin at the
beginning.

GERSTENKORN
(winking at Schweimann)
All right.

PREYSING
(far-away commencing
to read his report)
Since, on the eleventh of June, this
year -- when the first negotiations
for a merger between our respective
firms was entered into -- both parties
have fully agreed that this merger
can result only in mutual advantages.

INTERCUT this speech, which if played by Beery will be
interesting, with signals, winks and signs between the other
three men.

GERSTENKORN
Oh -- yes -- I beg your pardon!

PREYSING
I'm laying before you the last general
statement of our concern. Active
capital, plant and machinery, raw
material and finished product -- for
instance -- mop rags --

GERSTENKORN
Mop rags --!

Business between Preysing and Flaemmchen finding papers on
'Mop Rag' report.

GERSTENKORN
What we want to know about is
Manchester.

WAITZ
Yes, Mr. Preysing -- that's what we
want to know.

PREYSING
I'd like to wait for Justice
Zinnowitz, before I commit myself.

GERSTENKORN
Oh -- Preysing, Preysing --

PREYSING
No water -- What a place!

GERSTENKORN
All you have to do is phone for it.

Flaemmchen, who is on her toes and busy every minute, rushes
to the telephone and gives an order -- her conversation is
heard over the conversation of the men in the room -- CAMERA
HOLDS ON FLAEMMCHEN:

FLAEMMCHEN
Water -- seltzer, three or four
bottles and cigars -- good ones.

WAITZ
I can see this session is going to
be exhaustive.

PREYSING
Now to proceed with the projected
merger, the advantages for the Saxonia
are so obvious...

GERSTENKORN
Oh -- now let's talk like adults.
You want to tell us now a along story
of what your factory can do. We know
all that you could tell us and if
you tell the truth it wouldn't sound
so good. When you first approached
us...

PREYSING
We did not approach you.

WAITZ
(quickly looking
through the papers)
Letter on file September fourteenth
would show that you approached...

PREYSING
(snatching the document
from his hand --
losing his temper)
It isn't so -- this was a response
to a tentative feeler of your own.

GERSTENKORN
(snatching the document
violently away)
Tentative my foot -- a month before
this your old father-in-law came
very privately and scratched at my
door.

PREYSING
Scratched --
(he nearly chokes)
We did not take the initiative.

GERSTENKORN
Of course you took the initiative.

Zinnowitz enters the room.

ZINNOWITZ
Good morning, gentlemen -- I see the
conference is already underway.

PREYSING
Oh, here you are, Justice Zinnowitz --
I'm at cross-purposes with these
gentlemen -- will you clear up the
situation?

ZINNOWITZ
But the situation is perfectly clear,
If you will allow me --
(he clears his throat)

GERSTENKORN
How clear is Manchester?

ZINNOWITZ
Foggy -- frightfully foggy, always,
I'm told.
(to Preysing)
Have you said anything about
Manchester, Mr. Preysing?

PREYSING
I can make no statement about
Manchester at this time.

ZINNOWITZ
Well -- gentlemen.

There is dead silence for a moment -- he clears his throat,
commences in almost the same tone as Preysing.

ZINNOWITZ
Since, on the eleventh of June of
this year -- when the first
negotiations for a merger...

GERSTENKORN
(over Zinnowitz's
voice -- with a sigh --
sits back)
Thank God we're beginning at the
beginning.

ZINNOWITZ
(stops suddenly --
takes glasses from
his nose -- he is
speaking, not reading)
As you remember it -- when you
approached us...

GERSTENKORN
(bangs the paper down)
We did not approach you.

PREYSING
I know you did -- I said you did --

GERSTENKORN
And I said we didn't.

WAITZ
And I know we didn't.

During all this commotion Flaemmchen is paying no attention
whatsoever. She is calmly spraying herself with a perfume
atomizer and smiling at a gentleman. The noise continues
over her.

CUT TO:

NO SCENE 61

Sequence omitted from original script.

GRUSINSKAYA'S ROOM

The atmosphere has changed, the sun shines. Grusinskaya is
reclining on the chaise-lounge -- her Chinese robe drawn
about her. She speaks voluably.

GRUSINSKAYA
Oh -- I was ambitious then -- ambition
was in my blood -- no rest, no
stopping. We were drilled like little
soldiers -- We danced in the school
of the Imperial Ballet, in St.
Petersburg. I was little and slim
but hard as diamond -- a duty machine --
No rest, no stopping. And then -- I
became famous and whoever is famous
is alone... But why should I be
telling you this? Last night I did
not know you at all -- who are you,
really? -- I do not even know your
name.

BARON
I am Felix Benvenuto von Gaigern. My
mother called me Flix.

GRUSINSKAYA
Flix. -- And how do you live? What
kind of a person are you?

BARON
I'm a prodigal son, the black sheep
of a white flock -- I shall die on
the gallows.

GRUSINSKAYA
Really?

BARON
Really, I haven't a bit of character.
None at all.

GRUSINSKAYA
No?

BARON
When I was a little boy I was taught
to ride and be a gentleman -- at
school, it was a monastery, I learned
to pray and lie -- and ---

GRUSINSKAYA
And?

BARON
And then, in the war, to kill and
hide. That's all.

GRUSINSKAYA
And what do you do -- now?

BARON
I'm a gambler -- I'm running at large
like a happy pig, devouring anything
of life that pleases me, I really
belong in jail

GRUSINSKAYA
Oh! What a picture -- and what else?

BARON
(seriously)
I'm also a criminal and a hotel thief.
(he turns away)

GRUSINSKAYA
That's a silly joke.

BARON
(turns -- takes both
her hands)
Please look at me. You must believe
me -- you must believe that I love
you -- that I have never known what
love is -- until last night.
(he releases her hands
and turns away again.)

GRUSINSKAYA
What is the matter?

He does not answer.

GRUSINSKAYA
Flix!

The Baron takes the pearls out of his pocket and lays them
before her.

BARON
There.

GRUSINSKAYA
(with a little cry of
pain)
Oh --
(in the silence
Grusinskaya puts her
head in her hands
and thinks)

The Baron makes a gesture as if to stroke her hair and then
holds back.

GRUSINSKAYA
(softly)
Did you come here just -- just for
that? Oh -- it's horrible.

Pause.

She is suddenly cold.

GRUSINSKAYA
You may keep the pearls -- I don't
want them any more -- I'll make you
a present of them.

BARON
(passionately)
I don't want them now.

GRUSINSKAYA
(broken)
I'll not denounce you.

BARON
I know.

GRUSINSKAYA
So --

BARON
Yesterday I was a thief -- but now, --

GRUSINSKAYA
But now, you must go... I give you
the pearls. But now you must go ---

BARON
I wanted money desperately -- Can
you understand? -- That's why I wanted
the pearls. I was threatened -- I
was desperately in need of a certain
big sum of money. I've been following
you -- I've admired you. But I have
forced myself not to think about you --
Last night, at last, I managed to
came into your room and -- and now.

GRUSINSKAYA
(softly)
And now?

BARON
I couldn't go through with it.
(his head goes down
into her lap -- he
sighs:)
Remarkable.

His hand touches her hair -- tenderly.

BARON
Do you understand?

GRUSINSKAYA
Yes -- yes -- yes.

There is a sudden knock at the door.

GRUSINSKAYA
Quickly -- here.

With a quick gesture Grusinskaya beckons the Baron to the
bathroom. He disappears into the bathroom. She opens the
door, after finding the key and radiantly addresses Suzette.

GRUSINSKAYA
Good morning, Suzette.

SUZETTE
(delighted to see her
in a good mood)
Good morning, Madam.

She puts the coffee down on the table.

Charming piece of business as Suzette, in putting the coffee
down on the table must necessarily push back the heavily
crested cigarette case of the Baron.

SUZETTE
Madam has slept well?

GRUSINSKAYA
(enthusiastically)
Oh, yes, Suzette.

SUZETTE
Madam will dress now, it is late.

GRUSINSKAYA
Five minutes, Suzette, come back in
five minutes. I'll ring.

SUZETTE
Yes, madam Suzette knows all about
it.

She is a French woman. She is pleased.

SUZETTE
Madam is beautiful this morning.

As Grusinskaya hurries Suzette to the door she says:

GRUSINSKAYA
Yes, Suzette.

Suzette goes out. Quickly Grusinskaya crosses and flings
open the bathroom door. The Baron comes out.

GRUSINSKAYA
You must go now.

As she speaks the telephone goes. She gives the telephone a
dirty look. Telephone rings again. She pulls him across to
the telephone.

GRUSINSKAYA
There -- it begins.

With a hand in his she lifts the telephone receiver and
speaks.

GRUSINSKAYA
Hello -- hello -- Meierheim? Yes...

During this scene the Baron is touching her shoulder. A
charming light moment. She continues to speak into telephone.
His touch probably tickles her, she laughs -- quickly covers
the receiver so that Meierheim will not hear her laugh.

GRUSINSKAYA
(to Baron)
No --

During this scene she is listening to Meierheim. She frowns
suddenly --

GRUSINSKAYA
What?... Cancel Vienna?... Are you
mad? We always have great success in
Vienna... Certainly not. Come here
and see me... yes... good-bye.

She turns to the Baron and their arms go around each other.

The telephone rings again.

GRUSINSKAYA
(quickly)
There -- the day begins... I must go
to rehearsal.

She lets the telephone ring.

BARON
Grusinskaya --

GRUSINSKAYA
Yes.

BARON
You do believe that I really love
you?

GRUSINSKAYA
Yes -- If I didn't believe that, I'd
die after last night.

BARON
I want to be good to you -- madly
good.

GRUSINSKAYA
Suzette will be back here in a minute.

BARON
I'll go -- good-bye.

GRUSINSKAYA
Shall I see you again?

BARON
I --

Telephone bell rings again.

GRUSINSKAYA
Suzette will be back here any minute.

BARON
When are you leaving Berlin?

GRUSINSKAYA
Very early in the morning.

BARON
For Vienna?

GRUSINSKAYA
Can't -- can't you -- Couldn't you
come too -- I think it would be better --
for us -- for us both.

BARON
Oh -- yes but -- later.

GRUSINSKAYA
Why later?

BARON
I have no money now -- I must get
some first -- I must get some.

GRUSINSKAYA
I'll give you what you need -- I
have money.

BARON
Oh no -- that would spoil everything.
I'll -- I will manage somehow --
I'll manage myself. I will go with
you. When does the train leave?

GRUSINSKAYA
Six twenty-seven in the morning...
But the money?

BARON
Never mind -- I'll get it. I have a
whole day. I'll be on that train.

They move towards the door.

GRUSINSKAYA
I shall dance and you'll be with me
and then -- listen -- After that you
will come with me to Lake Como, I
have a villa there. The sun will be
shining. I will take a vacation --
six weeks -- eight weeks. We'll be
happy and lazy. And then you will go
with me to South America -- oh!

Telephone starts ringing.

GRUSINSKAYA
You must go now. Be careful on your
way to your room.

BARON
I'll go. -- I love you.
(he kisses her)
I'll be on that train. I'll get the
money.

She holds him back. The telephone is ringing.

GRUSINSKAYA
Don't do anything foolish -- I'm
alarmed about you.

BARON
Don't worry. I'll be on the train.
(he kisses her)
He leaves.

Alone with the telephone bell ringing, Grusinskaya breathes
deeply, stretches herself. She goes to the glass and looks
at herself -- smiling. Happily she takes the pearls, kisses
them, drops them into the casket -- picks up the telephone.

GRUSINSKAYA
(speaking into
telephone)
Yes, Pimenov... Yes... where are
you, in your room? Come, I will see
you now... hurry.

She rises from the telephone flutteringly, she is humming a
tune. She crosses to the mirror, pulls back her hair happily,
she is indeed younger.

Suzette is putting out a dark dress.

GRUSINSKAYA
Not that dark dress -- something
light -- bright -- it's a sunny
morning, Suzette.

Suzette happily glances at her.

There is a knock at the door.

GRUSINSKAYA
Come in.
(sings)

Pimenov enters, before he can speak --

GRUSINSKAYA
Good morning, Pimenov.

PIMENOV
(a little puzzled at
change in her)
Good morning, Gru -- your --

Before he can start speaking of last night she quickly speaks:

GRUSINSKAYA
Pimenov, I have an idea -- a new
ballet -- it must have mad music --
I'll explain it to you later. But
now, hurry to the theatre -- I want
full rehearsal -- properties -- full
ballet and some musicians. Hurry --
Quickly. I will be there --

During this scene Grusinskaya has not looked at him, she is
busy in the glass. Nice photography on hair and face.

Side scene between Suzette and Pimenov, as Suzette shows him
the cigarette case on the table.

As he goes through the door Grusinskaya crosses and almost
sweeps Suzette to the door with him.

PIMENOV
Gru -- you are positively radiant.

GRUSINSKAYA
Yes, Pimenov.
(quickly to Suzette)
One minute, Suzette, I will call
you.

They leave.

Grusinskaya shuts the door. She sweeps happily to the
telephone.

GRUSINSKAYA
(very very softly -
her voice is like
music to operator)
Hello -- will you -- will you get me
Baron von Gaigern, please... yes...
Baron von Gaigern -- yes...

While she waits, she moves with a sense of dance.

GRUSINSKAYA
(again into telephone)
Will you get me Baron von Gaigern,
please...
(she speaks quietly)
Cherie... yes... it is you...
nothing... good morning, good morning,
cherie... nothing... no... just to
tell you I'm happy.

FADE OUT SLOWLY:

Bring music up.

END OF SEQUENCE "#3"

SEQUENCE "#4"

EXT. HOTEL - SIGN

Music effect over sign "Grand Hotel." Precisely the same
angle as before. The sign lights.

DISSOLVE TO:

LOBBY - BY SENF'S DESK

The music comes up on the DISSOLVE into the original key
shot of the lobby.

Senf is busy.

The Baron's chauffeur is standing impatiently by his desk.
Business ad lib of Senf. He turns to the chauffeur who is
barring the way of an important looking alien.

SENF
Step back please.

Chauffeur makes no effort to move. Against the normal busy,
happy traffic of the evening he is a sinister figure. He
does not move but glares at Senf.

SENF
I've told you three times -- Baron
von Gaigern is out.

CHAUFFEUR
Did he leave any message for me?

SENF
No, he did not -- there is no message.

This whole scene is played in a very low key, almost in a
whisper, it is interrupted by the entrance of the Doctor.

DOCTOR
(to Senf)
Any letters?

SENF
No, doctor.

During this short scene the chauffeur saunters off.

Kringelein comes to the doctor.

KRINGELEIN
Oh, Doctor, such a day -- such a
day!

They move away from the scene.

Kringelein's voice diminishes as the CAMERA MOVES following
the chauffeur.

The chauffeur saunters unthoughtfully past the florist shop
and out of the door. As we pass the florist shop we see the
back of the Baron in the shot.

CAMERA PANS chauffeur out to door. He has not seen the Baron
in the florist shop. THE CAMERA PANS back to florist shop
waits for the Baron who emerges carrying his usual box of
orchids. CAMERA FOLLOWS BARON back to Senf's desk. Key shot.

BARON
(to Senf)
Madam Grusinskaya.

SENF
(taking the flowers
and handing them to
clerk)
For Madam Grusinskaya.

CLERK
(to page boy)
Madam Grusinskaya -- at once --

SENF
(to Baron)
Your chauffeur's been waiting, Baron.

BARON
(Quickly -- shortly)
All right.
(he glances around
apprehensively)

Kringelein is speaking to the doctor.

The Baron approaches them.

KRINGELEIN
Baron, we must have gone a hundred
miles an hour, at least...

BARON
Yes, quite.

KRINGELEIN
(to doctor)
We've been together all day... and
in an aeroplane.

DOCTOR
Life is changing you, Mr. Kringelein.

KRINGELEIN
Yes, thanks to the Baron. The best
shops, the very best. Look, Doctor,
silk -- feels so nice on the skin...
a London hat, see -- made in England,
that's silk, too -- fifty marks...
Look, the price is on it. That was
half my salary before. The Baron is
a very fine gentleman -- no one in
my life has been so nice to me as
the Baron.

The Baron smiles. He slaps his gauntlets on his dusty coat.

BARON
I'm going to change and we'll meet
for a drink in the Yellow Room.

KRINGELEIN
In the Yellow Room, where the music's
playing and the ladies are?

BARON
(amused)
Where the music's playing and the
ladies are...

The Baron leaves.

DOCTOR
No pain, Mr. Kringelein?

KRINGELEIN
Pain? Oh, no, Doctor. I think if I
had pain I'd be too happy to notice
it...

NOTE: Find cut here.

While Kringelein is talking, they move away from the CAMERA.

CUT TO:

FLASH OF BARON'S ROOM

The Baron enters, throws his gloves down on the bed, turns
up the light, picks up a piece of paper that's been pushed
under the door, glances at it.

FLASH INSERT OF THE PAPER

In scrawl: "I HAVE BEEN WAITING ALL DAY. WILL BE OUTSIDE OR
AT THE GARAGE." "S"

CUT BACK TO:

BARON

We again see the apprehension on the Baron's face. He crosses,
closes the window. As he does so we hear the noise from the
conference room.

Bring up noise from the conference room.

CUT TO:

CONFERENCE ROOM

We must have the feeling that these men have been arguing
all day. Cognac bottles, cigar ends, selzer water, remains
of some sandwiches. In other words it is a business
battlefield. Preysing is drawn and tired. Zinnowitz is on
his feet. Flaemmchen is fast asleep in her chair, making a
pretty picture.

ZINNOWITZ
...and let me say again for the tenth
time...
(he is hoarse and
tired)
...you people were quite ready for
the merger. You declared yourselves...
fully agreed on all the terms -- Why
should the signing of these articles
be suddenly held up?

GERSTENKORN
I've admitted that at one time we
had reason for desiring ther merger --
What reason have we now? The Preysing
Company has fallon upon evil days,
very evil days.

Preysing jumps to his feet.

PREYSING
Evil days -- I've shown you here --
(he bangs the paper)
-- my company exports to the Balkans
alone, sixty-five thousand marks
worth of mop rags a year.

GERSTENKORN
Mop rags -- mop rags -- we're
interested in something quite
different!

PREYSING
What?

SCHWEIMANN
(to Gerstenkorn --
with a sigh)
Shall I tell them again?

GERSTENKORN
(glancing at his watch)
Why waste time -- it's getting late.

SCHWEIMANN
You see -- what we are interested in --

GERSTENKORN
(interrupting)
Ah, come on -- we're going home.

Due to the long tedious session the men's collars are wilted.

ZINNOWITZ
(rising)
Mr. Preysing has too scrupulous a
regard for certainties...

GERSTENKORN
You've talked enough today, you're
hoarse now.

IMPORTANT CLOSEUP OF PREYSING

His hand goes to his pocket. Slowly he takes out the telegram
and glances at it. The following scene is played over this
closeup.

GERSTENKORN
Sorry, Preysing.
(he gets his hat)

PREYSING
(nervously)
You've decided against the merger?

GERSTENKORN
Yes --

PREYSING
Then, it's all over?

GERSTENKORN
Yes --

WAITZ
(to Zinnowitz)
Well -- well -- You could call my
office.

There is a general movement to go.

FLASH OF TELEGRAM

Trembling in Preysing's hand. "DEAL WITH MANCHESTER DEFINITELY
OFF."

GENERAL SHOT OF ROOM

Gerstenkorn crosses to Preysing.

GERSTENKORN
Goodbye, Preysing, I hope you pull
through. This is a very bad time to
be in such a crisis. We've...

PREYSING
(interrupting)
Why talk -- it's over -- it's over --
it's finished. You've broken off
negotiations. You did it. You're
calling them off. You had nothing on
your mind all day, but Manchester, --
Manchester -- Manchester.
(he develops almost a
passion)
You don't suppose for one moment
that I'm such a fool as not to have
something that I could say definitely
about Manchester.
(he is generating
almost a passion)

GERSTENKORN
What?

PREYSING
Oh no -- no -- the session is over.
Let's go, it's off. Thank you,
gentlemen.
(he starts packing up
his papers.)

GERSTENKORN
If you actually have news from
Manchester then...

PREYSING
Gentlemen, I am now free to
announce...
(he is perspiring,
his hands are
trembling)
...that the deal between my firm and
the Manchester Cotton Company has
been successfully negotiated.

GERSTENKORN
Preysing, you're joking with us.

SCHWEIMANN
You're a deep one.

QUICK CLOSEUP OF ZINNOWITZ

GENERAL SHOT OF ROOM

GERSTENKORN
In that case give us the articles.
We'll sign at once. We know all the
details...

PREYSING
(smiling, slowly folds
up the telegram and
puts it back in his
pocket)
I thought we'd suspended negotiations,
gentlemen.

GERSTENKORN
Under these circumstances it's quite
a different matter.

PREYSING
Under these circumstances we might
refuse to sign.

By this time, Waitz and Zinnowitz have the articles out upon
the table.

Preysing is perspiring.

Gerstenkorn puts his arms around Preysing's shoulders.

GERSTENKORN
Come on -- business is business --
Come on --

Preysing stands, looking ahead of him.

Gerstenkorn picks up the papers glances at them, looks at
Waitz.

Flaemmchen is awakening.

GERSTENKORN
Here's my signature -- here Preysing,
sign here.

ZINNOWITZ
What a session this has been.

While Preysing is signing.

SCHWEIMANN
It's twenty-five to six.

WAITZ
We should celebrate this with a bottle
of wine.

GERSTENKORN
(with his hat and
coat)
See you soon, Preysing. Next week
we'll meet and discuss further
details.

PREYSING
Next week.

Hasty hand-shaking, business of exits.

Waitz, Gerstenkorn and Schweimann out.

Preysing has not moved.

Zinnowitz takes the agreement and waves it in the air to dry
the signature.

PREYSING
(to himself)
Next week.

ZINNOWITZ
You let me talk till I'm hoarse and
you had Manchester sewed-up all the
time. Why?

Preysing does not answer.

Zinnowitz amiably shrugs his shoulders.

ZINNOWITZ
Well -- the deal has been put through.

Preysing commences to laugh suddenly with increasing violence.

PREYSING
Yes, it has been put through -- it
has been put through.

During this scene, Flaemmchen has risen, piled up her papers,
glanced at her watch. During this action Flaemmchen motions
to Zinnowitz that she is going down to dance, etc., Preysing
is unaware of this action. Flaemmchen leaves the room trying
not to attract attention.

ZINNOWITZ
(to Preysing)
What's the matter with you?

PREYSING
(hysterically)
Bluff -- Bluff -- all bluff.

ZINNOWITZ
What's bluff?

PREYSING
(throwing the telegram
on the table)
That.

ZINNOWITZ
(reading at out loud)
'Deal with Manchester definitely
off! "Preysing, oh -- I'd never have
thought it of you.

PREYSING
No one would have thought it of me.
I've been getting rusty in
Fredersdorf. Well, if bluff is what
the world wants I guess I can put up
as big a bluff as anyone. From now
on...
(he turns away)

ZINNOWITZ
You must go to Manchester at once
yourself and really see it through.

PREYSING
Yes -- I must go to England -- I was
desperate -- Now I don't care --
This sort of thing goes to a man's
head.

ZINNOWITZ
What you need is some relaxation.

PREYSING
Yes -- that's what I want -- I'd
like to tear loose -- I'd like a
drink. I'd like to go down to that
dancing place. I'd like to start
something.

ZINNOWITZ
I can understand that -- after your --
uh --

PREYSING
Say it -- say it -- my lie -- it's
the first time in thirty years that
I've ever... Where's that
stenographer? Miss Flaemm...

ZINNOWITZ
What do you want with her?

PREYSING
I want to see her, I want to do some
dictating -- report of the conference
for my father-in-law.

ZINNOWITZ
She had an engagement in the Yellow
Room at five o'clock -- she was in a
hurry.

PREYSING
Zinnowitz, would you say she was
pretty?

ZINNOWITZ
Pretty as a picture.

PREYSING
Let's go down and find her -- I need
a drink -- Come along Zinnowitz.
(he is picking up
papers)
I don't know anything about women --
been married for twenty-six years.

ZINNOWITZ
Bluff does it, Preysing, bluff does
it. Goodnight.

Preysing is very excited, they start to leave -- at that
moment the telephone rings.

PREYSING
Aeh!

He crosses to the telephone.

PREYSING
(into telephone)
Hello... Father-in-law?... Is that
you?... The agreement is signed -- I
did it... yes, father-in-law... but
now I must go to Manchester.

When he picks the telephone up his hands are shaking --

DISSOLVE HANDS INTO:

COCKTAIL SHAKER

-- which shakes more. Music crashes up --

DISSOLVE OUT:

DISSOLVE INTO BAR

Kringelein and the Doctor are just entering. Kringelein is
changed. His hair has been cut short and his moustache is
gone, he looks almost saucy.

DOCTOR
(to barman)
Barman -- whiskey --
(to Kringelein)
For you, Mr. Kringelein?

KRINGELEIN
For me? -- Oh, please, something
sweet and cold.

BARMAN
A Louisiana flip, sir?

KRINGELEIN
A Louisiana flip, that sounds very
nice -- sweet, eh? --

During the following speech Kringelein keeps reaching for
the moustache that is not there. He is thoroughly happy.

DOCTOR
What do you do in the Grand Hotel?
Eat -- sleep -- loaf around -- do
business -- flirt a little -- dance
a little. A hundred doors to one
hall and nobody knows anything about
the person next to him. When you
leave another takes your room and
lies in your bed -- the end.

At that moment Flaemmchen enters.

FLAEMMCHEN
Good evening, Mr. Kringelein --
Where's the Baron?

KRINGELEIN
I'm waiting for him here. The Baron
and I have been together all day. A
hundred miles an hour -- in a motor
car -- and in an aeroplane -- It was
marvelous --

FLAEMMCHEN
Mr. Kringelein -- How you have
changed, you look so nice.

KRINGELEIN
Oh, thank you, Miss Flaemm. Oh,
please, Miss Flaemm -- Permit me,
Miss Flaemm, won't you have something
sweet -- a Louisiana flip.
(to barman)
A Louisiana flip.

FLAEMMCHEN
(to barman)
No - absinthe.

KRINGELEIN
(amazed)
Yes -- that --

Kringelein is beating time to the music -- a little carried
away.

Flaemmchen laughs.

FLAEMMCHEN
You like music?

KRINGELEIN
Yes -- it's stimulating -- a man
might --

FLAEMMCHEN
(mischievously)
A man might what?

KRINGELEIN
I don't know -- I'd like to do
anything --

FLAEMMCHEN
(very quietly)
Oh -- you would!

The Baron enters quickly.

BARON
(to Flaemmchen)
Hello -- sorry I'm late.

KRINGELEIN
Oh -- here you are, Baron. A drink --
A Louisiana flip?

BARON
Hello, Mr. Kringelein. How do you
feel now?

KRINGELEIN
A little strange, Baron.

FLAEMMCHEN
I'd given you up.

BARON
(to Flaemmchen)
Sorry.

KRINGELEIN
A drink, Baron -- A Louisiana flip?

BARON
No thanks -- keeping my head clear.

FLAEMMCHEN
Dance then?
(they exit)

KRINGELEIN
(to Doctor)
She's beautiful -- isn't she?

DOCTOR
(to Kringelein)
Oh -- there are plenty of women.

BARON AND FLAEMMCHEN DANCING

FLAEMMCHEN
What have you been doing all day?

BARON
Chasing around.

FLAEMMCHEN
Chasing what?

BARON
Money.

They dance a few steps, in silence.

FLAEMMCHEN
You were very different yesterday.

BARON
Yesterday -- yes -- that was
yesterday.

They dance into the crowd.

CUT BACK TO:

BAR

DOCTOR
Well, Mr. Kringelein, are you getting
what you're looking for?

KRINGELEIN
What, Doctor?

DOCTOR
A masculine paradise -- drink, the
ladies, dancing...

KRINGELEIN
I had a very good opportunity, a
young lady asked me to dance -- I
ought to be able to dance, it seems
to be very important.

DOCTOR
You must learn as quickly as your
time allows -- Believe me Mr.
Kringelein, a man who isn't with a
woman is a dead man.

KRINGELEIN
Haven't you anyone -- Haven't you
anybody -- you -- I mean -- Are you
all alone in the world.

DOCTOR
(quietly)
I'm always alone -- I have been
everything.

KRINGELEIN
Everything?

DOCTOR
I was sent as a military surgeon to
South Africa. Stinking climate. Taken
prisoner. Home on parole not to fight.
I was a surgeon in the Great War
till the end. Grenade in the face.
Carried diphtheria bacilli in the
wound until 1920. Isolated two years.
(pause)
I've been everything.

The music has stopped.

CUT TO:

BARON AND FLAEMMCHEN ON DANCE FLOOR

FLAEMMCHEN
That was lovely.

BARON
Will you do me a big favor?

FLAEMMCHEN
I'll do anything for you.

BARON
Would you like to make a man happy?

FLAEMMCHEN
(quietly)
Yes -- I'd love to.

BARON
Then dance the next number with
Kringelein.

FLAEMMCHEN
Why?

BARON
I feel sorry for him.

FLAEMMCHEN
You're not a bit like you were
yesterday.

BARON
I fell in love last night -- the
real thing.

FLAEMMCHEN
Oh -- there's no real thing -- it
doesn't exist.

BARON
I thought that, too -- but I found
that it does. Come along, dance with
Kringelein.

FLAEMMCHEN
Anything for you.

They move off. As they approach the bar, happily Preysing
pushes into scene, touches Flaemmchen's arm.

PREYSING
Miss Flaemm.

FLAEMMCHEN
Hello!

PREYSING
I must speak with you, Miss Flaemm.

FLAEMMCHEN
(with the Baron)
Presently, Mr. Preysing.

PREYSING
It's urgent.

BARON
Pardon me, the lady has urgent
business here with me.

PREYSING
(to himself)
Insolent -- Berlin manners.

At that moment Kringelein has descended from the stool and
crosses to Preysing.

KRINGELEIN
I wish you a very good evening, Mr.
Preysing. You are staying here, too,
Mr. Preysing?

PREYSING
I don't know you.

KRINGELEIN
Oh -- you must know me -- Kringelein
at the plant. Assistant bookkeeper,
building C, room twenty-three --
third floor.

FLAEMMCHEN
(quickly)
Come and dance with me, Mr.
Kringelein.

PREYSING
I must speak to you, Miss Flaemm --
business.

FLAEMMCHEN
(lightly)
Tomorrow morning.

PREYSING
No -- now.

FLAEMMCHEN
Do you gentlemen know each other,
Mr. Kringelein -- Mr. Preysing --
Baron von Gaigern.

They bow stiffly.

PREYSING
Mr. Kringelein will be a good friend
and not accept your invitation to
dance.

KRINGELEIN
I could not think of not accepting.

PREYSING
You say that you are employed by us
in Fredersdorf, and here you are in
Berlin, indulging in diversions which
ill befit your position and which
are very much beyond your means --
Quite extraordinary, Mr. Kringelein,
I think we will look into your books.

Kringelein stands watching Preysing, his eyes narrowing.

FLAEMMCHEN
Now, children, no fighting -- save
that for the office. Let's have our
dance.
(her arms go around
Kringelein. They
dance off)

PREYSING
I'll remember you, Mr. Kringelein.

BARON
Oh, let the poor devil alone.

PREYSING
I did not ask your advice.

The two men eye each other; for a moment there might be a
fight.

BARON
I think it would be much better if
you went away.

PREYSING
We shall see who remains here the
longer.

BARON
(shrugging his
shoulders)
As you will.

Preysing leans against the bar, orders a cognac. The Baron
turns his back to him, watching the dancing.

CUT TO:

FAEMMCHEN AND KRINGELEIN ON FLOOR

FLAEMMCHEN
You must look at my face and not at
the floor.

KRINGELEIN
Yes.

FLAEMMCHEN
You're trembling.

KRINGELEIN
I never danced before -- in public.

FLAEMMCHEN
You dance splendidly.

KRINGELEIN
I'm happy, Miss Flaemm.

FLAEMMCHEN
Really?

KRINGELEIN
For the first time in my life, I'm
happy.

Kringelein shows signs of exhaustion.

Flaemmchen watches him quickly.

FLAEMMCHEN
Let's stop -- I'm tired.

It is obvious that she has stopped because of Kringelein's
distress.

KRINGELEIN
Thank you, Miss Flaemm.

They move back to the bar. Preysing catches Flaemmchen's
arm.

PREYSING
Well now, Miss Flaemm, we can talk.

KRINGELEIN
Some champagne, Miss Flaemm?

PREYSING
You may go, Mr. Kringelein.

KRINGELEIN
Does the world belong to you, Mr.
Preysing?

PREYSING
What is this insolence?

KRINGELEIN
Do you think you have free license
to be insulting? Believe me you have
not. You think you're superior, but
you're quite an ordinary man.

PREYSING
Go away -- go away.

FLAEMMCHEN
Please -- please!

KRINGELEIN
You don't like to see me enjoying
myself.

PREYSING
Who are you? -- An embezzler most
likely.

KRINGELEIN
An embezzler -- you're going to take
that back, right here in the presence
of this young lady -- who do you
think you're talking to? You think
I'm dirt, if I'm dirt, you're a lot
dirtier, Mr. Industrial Magnate
Preysing.

PREYSING
You're discharged.

KRINGELEIN
Me?

PREYSING
Yes you -- shut your mouth -- get
out -- you're discharged.

Kringelein's hat has fallen from the stool upon the floor.
Flaemmchen picks it up, brushes it.

Kringelein starts to laugh.

The Baron steps into the scene.

The Doctor slowly comes from the bar.

KRINGELEIN
You can't discharge me -- I'm my own
master now -- at last. I'm ill, I'm
going to die -- do you understand?
I'm going to die very soon. Nothing
can happen to me now. Nobody can do
anything any more to me. By the time
you can have discharged me I shall
have been dead already.
(his laugh becomes a
convulsive sob)

The Baron steps between the two looking straight into
Preysing's face.

DOCTOR
Come, Mr. Kringelein.
(he pulls him out of
the scene towards
the bar)

PREYSING
(his fists clenched,
between his teeth)
The man's insane -- he acts as if he
is glad he is going to die...
(hesitates -- to
Flaemmchen)
I shall see you in the lobby in half
an hour.

END SEQUENCE "#4"

SEQUENCE "#5"

FADE IN:

KEY SHOT OF LOBBY OVER SENF'S HEAD

General activity.

The house detective, later identified, is talking to the
chauffeur. He leaves the chauffeur and crosses to Senf.

HOUSE DETECTIVE
Better let him stay -- I've sent for
the Baron... How's your wife coming
along?

SENF
I was at the hospital all night
walking up and down the corridor.
They wouldn't let me in to see her.
She has the pains, but the child
doesn't come and I have to stay here
chained to this desk.

HOUSE DETECTIVE
It will be all right.

SENF
I hope so.

At that moment Preysing enters.

PREYSING
Did you send that page?

SENF
The young lady's there, sir.

Preysing glances off to see Flaemmchen standing looking
around.

Preysing crosses to Flaemmchen.

FLAEMMCHEN
Oh, yes, Mr. Preysing?

PREYSING
Sit here.
(calls to a boy)
Cognac -- for you?

FLAEMMCHEN
Nothing.

At that moment the Baron and Kringelein pass.

Preysing glances up at Kringelein as he passes.

PREYSING
I'm going to keep an eye on that
Kringelein fellow. I'll find out
where he gets the money to hang around
the Grand Hotel.

FLAEMMCHEN
Well -- you want me?

PREYSING
(looks straight at
her)
Yes.

FLAEMMCHEN
Well?

PREYSING
I must go to England -- at once.

FLAEMMCHEN
Well?

PREYSING
You see, I'd like to take a secretary
with me for my correspondence and --
humm -- humm -- for company on the
trip -- I'm nervous -- I need somebody --
I don't know if you quite understand
me. You said you have travelled with
gentlemen -- and I mean --

FLAEMMCHEN
I understand perfectly.

PREYSING
What do you think your salary would
be -- for such a trip?

FLAEMMCHEN
Wait -- I must figure it up.
(she smokes and thinks)
First, I'll need -- clothes -- shoes --
it's cold in England in March, I'll
need a suit... You'd want me to look
nice?

PREYSING
Of course -- of course.
(he is fidgeting)

FLAEMMCHEN
A thousand marks --
(she waits anxiously
thinking it might be
too much)

PREYSING
It's agreed -- I will get a room
here for you.

She is looking away.

PREYSING
I can get a room here in the Grand
Hotel for you.

She still looks away.

PREYSING
Can you pay some attention to me?

FLAEMMCHEN
Oh, yes.

PREYSING
(looking off)
Insolent young cub!

FLAEMMCHEN
You mean Baron von Gaigern?

PREYSING
Baron!

FLAEMMCHEN
Well, he's a gentleman!

THE BARON

Who is leaning against a chair by a pillar with Kringelein.

THE CAMERA APPROACHES THEM.

They are not speaking. The Baron is looking off at:

FLASH A SHOT FROM HIS ANGLE OF CHAUFFEUR

Sauntering between the door and Senf's desk.

BACK TO:

THE BARON

He slumps on the arm of the chair.

KRINGELEIN
(watching him)
The Baron is tired?

BARON
No, Kringelein, not tired, -- just --
(he shrugs his
shoulders)
Well -- well --

KRINGELEIN
Perhaps this evening, Baron, we could
go to the Casino -- the place we
passed with the marvelous bright
lights?

BARON
I'd like to Kringelein, but I can't --
I am broke!

KRINGELEIN
Broke -- A Baron? But, Baron --

The Baron looks off, sees the chauffeur --

CUT IN:

FLASH OF CHAUFFEUR

Arguing with Senf.

CUT BACK TO:

BARON

BARON
Excuse me, Mr. Kringelein.
(he strides off)

Keep the CAMERA on Kringelein as he watches the Baron.

He takes out his pocket-book and looks at his money commencing
to count it. The thought is in his mind of offering the Baron
money. Charming scene.

CUT TO:

BARON AND CHAUFFEUR

Moving into position. They are talking.

BARON
(quietly)
I've quit.

CHAUFFEUR
You can't.

BARON
I'm not going to get those pearls
and neither are you.

CHAUFFEUR
What about the money?

BARON
I'll pay you back.

CHAUFFEUR
How?

BARON
I have an idea working in my head...
(he glances at
Kringelein)

CHAUFFEUR
You might find a bullet through that
head...

BARON
If you did that, you'd get nothing
except the police after you. If you
wait -- I'll give you your six
thousand back --

At that moment a voice is heard.

VOICE
Madam Grusinskaya's car -- Madam
Grusinskaya's car.

It is passed along.

INSIDE PORTER
(calls through his
little telephone)
Madam Grusinskaya's car --

MEGAPHONE
(outside)
Madam Grusinskaya's car --

BARON
(quickly to chauffeur)
Later.
(Chauffeur exits with
bad grace.)

Baron looks off...

FULL SHOT -- FROM HIS ANGLE

Like a pageant Grusinskaya sweeps forward -- pretty shot.
Music comes up.

Grusinskaya is followed by Suzette, Pimenov and Meierheim.
People turn to look at her. She sweeps forward.

As she gets to the door she faces the Baron. She steps quickly
aside to him. Pimenov and Meierheim pause.

GRUSINSKAYA
(to them)
Go on please -- go on, Suzette.

She and the Baron are alone.

BARON
(quietly)
Bless you...

GRUSINSKAYA
Are you coming to the theatre? Oh --
I shall dance tonight -- How I shall
dance -- I want to feel that you are
in the theatre.

BARON
I can't.

GRUSINSKAYA
No?

BARON
No! I can't explain now. Oh, look --
the pearls. You wear them now...

GRUSINSKAYA
Why do you think --

BARON
Why?

GRUSINSKAYA
They've brought me such good luck --
you --

He takes her hand, kisses it quietly.

GRUSINSKAYA
I'm worried about you.

BARON
Don't.

GRUSINSKAYA
On the train?

BARON
Yes -- I will be on the train.

GRUSINSKAYA
Till then.

BARON
Bless you --

During this scene Kringelein has been hovering nearby. As
Grusinskaya turns away and exits, Kringelein approaches the
Baron, who is standing perfectly still, looking off, -- his
mind miles away.

KRINGELEIN
Was the Baron joking, or is it really
true that the Baron is -- in financial
straits.

BARON
(lightly)
Absolutely true, Kringelein and I
have to raise some money immediately.

KRINGELEIN
If the Baron -- if you would permit
me --

The Baron looks at him suddenly.

BARON
What?

KRINGELEIN
I would be awfully glad to oblige,
you've been so decent to me. Three
hundred?

BARON
If I could get into a game I might
win some.

KRINGELEIN
Gambling! I'd like that. I have over
six thousand eight hundred marks
with me.

BARON
If we could scare up some men to
play.

KRINGELEIN
We could come to my room.

BARON
(with enthusiasm)
Good!

At that moment Flaemmchen passes.

BARON
Going?

FLAEMMCHEN
Yes --

Flaemmchen hesitates as though she wanted to say something
that is on her mind.

A curious little scene.

She doesn't speak, she just turns suddenly through the door.
The Baron glances after her a little puzzled, turns back to
Kringelein.

BARON
Ready, Kringelein?

KRINGELEIN
Ready, Baron.

They move off and are last in the crowd.

FADE OUT:

END OF SEQUENCE "#5"

SEQUENCE "#6"

No scenes 88-93 inclusive

Sequence omitted from original script.

DISSOLVE INTO:

KRINGELEIN'S ROOM

Possibly ten men are gathered about a green table. They are
playing cards. There are champagne bottles, glasses, etc.,
on the table -- a great deal of smoke. Good atmosphere. The
game is [...] fer. There is a dead silence except for the
monotonous words of the players.

White faced, the Baron has the bank.

Otternschlag is seen to close the door quietly and approach
the table.

Kringelein's back is to us.

They are smart people, not professional gamblers.

There is a tension in the room. The men are gathered around
tightly. We do not see the cards.

The following voices are heard:

BARON'S VOICE
All right, gentlemen.

VOICES
I play -- I play -- Here -- Up --
Playing --

KRINGELEIN'S VOICE
Yes -- me.

Several men glance at Kringelein and the size of his stake.

KRINGELEIN
Is that too much, Baron?

BARON
(glances down at his
own money)
No -- not at all.

KRINGELEIN
All right then.

BARON
All right then.

There is tension in the room. The Baron deals two cards.
Kringelein takes cards.

A MAN
(quickly)
Don't show them.

Kringelein turns it down. He is like a little boy learning a
new game.

The Baron deals himself a card.

KRINGELEIN
(to Baron)
What do I do now?

The Baron is serious. There is enough money on the table to
take him to Vienna.

A MAN
(next to Kringelein)
Turn 'em up.

KRINGELEIN
Oh yes -- that's right -- look! I
win, don't I --
(he turns the card up)

The Baron rises.

BARON
There you are gentlemen.

A MAN
(to Kringelein)
Will you take the bank, sir?

KRINGELEIN
Yes -- I'll take everything gentlemen --
please, let us drink -- champagne ---
champagne is expensive and good. I'm
winning more than I used to earn in
a year -- double what I used to earn.
(he is counting his
money)

They hand him the cards.

Kringelein kisses the Baron -- he looks around.

KRINGELEIN
Where is the Baron -- where are you,
Baron?

At the side table the Baron is standing -- he is drinking --
his face is white -- he has lost.

KRINGELEIN
(rising quickly)
Excuse me, gentlemen.

DOCTOR
(sitting down in
Kringelein's place)
I'll take the bank -- All right,
gentlemen.

Kringelein has come to the Baron.

BARON
That was my last.

KRINGELEIN
You've lost everything?

BARON
I've no luck.

KRINGELEIN
Pardon me, Baron. Permit me again...
(he puts bills in
Baron's hand.)

Baron pours out a glass of champagne -- he has been drinking
plenty -- he hands glass to Kringelein.

BARON
Drink to me, Kringelein -- it's my
last chance.

KRINGELEIN
(earnestly)
I do drink, Baron -- I drink to you,
Baron and to win.
(he drinks)
It's good, -- come along, Baron.

They both move back to the table where the Doctor holds the
bank.

BARON
I take five hundred.

KRINGELEIN
All of that at once, Baron?

The Baron picks cards, shows them to Kringelein who doesn't
understand.

BARON
Eight.
(he is triumphant.)

DOCTOR'S VOICE
(rings in background)
Nine.

The Baron throws the cards into the middle of the table and
turns to Kringelein:

BARON
That's it. The luck's with you.
(he walks away.)

VOICES
Come along, Mr. Kringelein. Sit here.

KRINGELEIN
I'm having luck for the first time
in my life.

A MAN
Your bank, Mr. Kringelein.

Kringelein seats himself, puts his glass of champagne down
on the table.

Doctor leaves table, crosses to Baron who is pouring another
drink.

DOCTOR
Out, Baron?

BARON
(bitterly)
For a while -- I'll recover -- in
ten or twenty years.
(he points)
Look at that.

He has pointed and turned off because we hear Kringelein's
voice:

KRINGELEIN'S VOICE
I've won again, Baron -- I've won
again.

Baron moves out of scene followed by Doctor. As Baron
approaches table.

KRINGELEIN
Baron, I drink and win -- I drink
and win -- I win and drink!
(he is pulling money
towards him, counting
it, eagerly,
frantically, not the
movement of a miser,
not a greedy movement,
but the movement of
an excited child
liberated. Money has
become so much mad
paper to him.)

During the foregoing scene, one of the men at the table has
answered the ringing of the telephone bell, he comes back
now.

A MAN
There are complaints in the hotel
about the noise.

VOICES
What time is it? Getting late? Let's
break it up!
(to Kringelein)
You've been very lucky... Where's my
coat? Let's go. He's drunk anyway!...
Goodnight, Baron. Let's wind up the
game, I'm broke and tired; you can't
play against him. I put my hat down
here, somewhere. I think I'll have a
drink before I go. By the way, I've
got to see you tomorrow morning.
How've you been, Doctor?

Business ad lib. General business of slow normal exit.

Kringelein looks up from counting his money. He has been
like a little boy with a Christmas stocking. He looks up
suddenly, sees men are leaving --

KRINGELEIN
Oh, don't go, gentlemen! -- Stay a
while.
(he stands to his
feet)
Be my guests!

By this time the men are pausing by the door.

KRINGELEIN
I oughtn't to presume, but I --
(he is a little drunk)
I'm so grateful to you -- it's been
so marvelous. The first time in my
life I have gambled -- I've danced!
Oh, you can laugh, gentlemen, but
it's the first time in my life I've
ever tasted life!

A MAN
(slapping him on back)
Splendid!

There is a general feeling in the room that although this
man is drunk he is terribly sincere, and that there is no
wish to embarrass themselves or him. In fact, there is a
nervous impatient movement among the men. But Kringelein has
reached an emotional pitch.

KRINGELEIN
Life, gentlemen, is wonderful, but
very dangerous. You must have courage
for it, then it's wonderful. You
gentlemen don't know that because
you are all healthy and happy, but I --
believe me -- a man must know death
and not until then does a man know
anything about life.

A MAN
(sings)
Rejoice in life while yet the small
lamp burns.

General noise among men, some are ribald, others are serious.
Two men come and shake hands with Kringelein, bidding him
goodnight.

The Baron puts his hand restrainingly on Kringelein's
shoulder.

Kringelein almost staggers towards the sideboard. The men
are nearing the door.

A MAN
(starts singing)
It's a short life and a gay one...

KRINGELEIN
(seizing a glass of
champagne)
Every glass high to life -- the
splendid, dangerous, mighty, brief --
brief life -- and the courage to
live it.
(turns to Baron)
Baron, you know -- I've only lived
since last night -- but that little
while seems longer than all the time
before -- all the --
(he collapses suddenly
onto the floor)

Business ad lib.

The doctor is there quickly. The Baron next.

MAN
Drunk.

ANOTHER MAN
Poor fellow.

General normal business ad lib between the men. Perhaps three
of them help him up, including the Baron. They carry
Kringelein to the bed.

VOICES
(of players mingling)
Drunk? No, he's ill. Looks ill.
(well paused over:)
He's a doctor -- The doctor's here --
He's just drunk!

DOCTOR
Gentlemen, this man is ill -- very
ill -- if you will leave.

VOICES
Certainly, Doctor. Goodnight!
Goodnight, Baron! Bad luck!

DRUNKEN MAN
He's not used to champagne -- why
does he drink it?

Little comedy on exit. Ad lib.

INTERCUT FOR RELIEF -- Kringelein's face -- white, drawn,
tragic.

One man, perhaps, remains.

MAN
Can I help, doctor?

DOCTOR
No, the Baron will stay.

BARON
Certainly.

Man leaves. During this scene the Baron has been carefully
making Kringelein comfortable on the bed, bolstering pillows
behind his head. Kringelein's eyes are shut tightly, his
hands are limp.

By the business of the Baron, although we do not of course
know it, this is the time that he takes the wallet from
Kringelein and puts it in his own pocket.

We might perhaps remember a sudden turn away in which we see
his back and his right hand raised as though reaching in his
inside pocket --

He stands looking down at Kringelein.

DOCTOR
(drops Kringelein's
hand)
It will be over in a minute.

Kringelein's eyes flutter. His voice sounds hoarsely:

KRINGELEIN
Over -- over so soon -- it has just
begun.
(he closes his eyes
suddenly)
Oh, the pain.

DOCTOR
Try and sleep, Kringelein, don't be
afraid.

KRINGELEIN
(mutteringly)
I'd like to live a little longer but --
I'm not afraid to die -- I'm not...

BARON
(touching his shoulder
gently)
You'll be all right, Kringelein.
(he moves from the
bed -- takes out a
cigarette, moves to
the table. He seizes
his drink)

KRINGELEIN'S VOICE
(out of scene)
My pocketbook... my money in it...

DOCTOR'S VOICE
What do you say -- what?

We watch Baron's face, he looks back over his shoulder.

DOCTOR'S VOICE
You what -- Oh, isn't it there?

KRINGELEIN'S VOICE
No -- But no I -- Baron, I've lost
my pocketbook.

Baron turns in this scene. He walks forward toward them.

The Doctor's hands are on Kringelein's coat.

DOCTOR
There is no pocketbook here... On
the floor probably.
(He glances down)

KRINGELEIN
(starting up suddenly)
More than fourteen thousand marks...
were in that pocketbook.

DOCTOR
(looking at Baron)
Fourteen thousand marks... One can
travel -- one's happiness might depend
on fourteen thousand marks -- don't
you think so, Baron?

BARON
(with a shrug)
Quite possibly.

At that moment, Kringelein, who has been staring up at the
ceiling, his hands clenching and reclenching, starts up.

KRINGELEIN
Oh, I've got to find it.

DOCTOR
Stay where you are.

KRINGELEIN
No -- I must find it --
(he starts talking)
Fourteen thousand two hundred marks.
(he pulls himself to
the side of the bed)

The doctor goes to restrain him.

KRINGELEIN
I'm all right, Doctor. There's no
pain now -- only you don't know what
that money means to a man like me.

He is suddenly on his hands and knees, crawling along the
floor, looking for it, like a little boy; his drunkenness,
his condition, makes the situation tragic. He actually gets
under the card table.

The Doctor looks at the Baron.

The Baron only watches Kringelein. He follows him, fascinated.

KRINGELEIN
(talking at intervals
as he crawls looking
for money)
You don't know, because you've never
lived like a dog -- in a hole -- and
saved and scrimped. My life hangs
upon that money, Baron. Nobody gives
you anything. You have to buy
everything and pay cash for it. I
wanted to pay for my last days with
that money. Every hour costs money.
I've nothing -- nothing but that
pocketbook.
(he crawls along the
floor on his hands
and knees talking to
the carpet as he
looks)
I must have it back.
(he pauses breathless --
like an animal along
the wall -- looking
up at the men)

The foregoing speech is intercut with the following action
in which Kringelein's voice is heard throughout -- thus it
is not a long speech:

The Baron watches. He throws his cigarette away -- he bites
his lip -- sweat breaks out upon his forehead; again he is a
thief. When he wanted pearls the love of a woman stopped
him. Now he wants this money and pity, a slow growing pity
for this tragic, dying thing is stopping him -- and all the
time the Doctor watches.

The one, whole eye pierces into the Baron's melting
conscience.

Twice during the speech at a spot, through and during
rehearsal, to be selected, the Doctor's voice, droning but
piercing, says:

DOCTOR
He must find his money, Baron.
(next time)
Mr. Kringelein should find his
pocketbook, Baron, shouldn't he?

These are two interjections.

And now, Kringelein lies upon the floor, a troubled little
sack of pain, his head down.

The Baron turns away. He bends down as though he were looking
for the pocketbook. We see him take it from his pocket and
turn. There is a very light, almost triumphant ring in his
voice as he says:

BARON
Here -- here it is. Here's your
pocketbook, Kringelein.

KRINGELEIN
(his head coming up)
Oh -- yes -- that's it -- you found
it -- you found it for me, Baron.

BARON
(quickly)
Goodnight, Kringelein.
(he moves towards the
door.)

KRINGELEIN
No -- no please -- oh, don't go --
don't go -- don't leave me alone,
Baron.

DOCTOR
You've nothing to fear, Kringelein

KRINGELEIN
No.

BARON
Come, get up -- come let me help
you.

NOTE: If he is a strong actor he can pick Kringelein up --
If not, he and Doctor lift Kringelein to bed.

BARON
You're all right now -- it's very
late -- goodnight, Kringelein.

KRINGELEIN
Oh, no, stay here, Baron -- stay.

Baron bites his lip. It is the first and only time in the
play that we see a tear near -- the strong man almost breaks.

DOCTOR'S VOICE
Goodnight, Baron.

BARON
Goodnight.
(his hand presses on
Kringelein's shoulder --
he exits)

CUT OUT INTO:

CORRIDOR

Baron shuts door and pauses. In front of him is the door of
the woman he loves. Down beyond is his own empty room. In
his pockets nothing. In his CLOSEUP he makes the audience
feel his problem with him.

This man who has lived and whistled and love through the
play becomes a tragic, lonely, harrassed figure. The Baron
has broken. His fists dig into his eyes -- he brushes his
hair back.

Over this comes with almost an impertinence, a tiny whistle.
He looks up and away down the corridor. The figure of
Flaemmchen stands there, a small black bag in her hand. The
Baron pulls himself together and smiles characteristically.
He walks down the corridor.

BARON
Flaemmchen, what are you doing here
in the middle of the night.

FLAEMMCHEN
Looking for my room -- one sixty-
six.

BARON
You live here?

FLAEMMCHEN
For tonight.
(she points to door --
she looks at him a
long time)

BARON
Oh!

FLAEMMCHEN
Yes -- oh!

BARON
Well -- such is life, Flaemmchen.

FLAEMMCHEN
And Baron, thanks so much for
everything.

They both go into their respective rooms.

Here are our two gay young characters. The gay, fresh
Flaemmchen and the debonair Baron, crucified for lack of
funds. Both trying to smile, both trying to be light about
themselves. Yet, each about to involve themselves tragically
for the want of a little money.

FLAEMMCHEN'S ROOM

Flaemmchen enters her room cautiously. Except for one lamp
burning the room is in darkness and empty. From the adjoining
door to Preysing's room a thin stream of light. She puts
down her bag quickly, tiptoes through the bathroom to his
door. She peeps through.

CUT TO:

FLASH OF PREYSING'S ROOM

from her angle.

Preysing stretched on bed flat, his stomach a mountain and
on it the magazine that he has been reading with Flaemmchen's
picture. He is looking at the ceiling. She knows he is awake
because a thin stream of smoke comes from his cigar in his
hand.

FLASH OF FLAEMMCHEN

An idea occurs to her. She could possibly sneak into bed and
he would go to sleep and there would be nothing that night.

CAMERA FOLLOWS HER as she tiptoes to her room. She closes
the door noiselessly and listens. She throws off her hat and
takes off her coat. Opens her bag and takes out night dress,
lingerie, etc. The lid of her bag falls suddenly. She starts
at the noise. "Has it awakened him." She looks off.

SHOT AT BATHROOM DOOR

The thin stream of light is filled suddenly, the door of the
adjoining room opens and back-lighted from the other room
the huge form of Preysing appears. In this odd lighting he
is a little more than Preysing. He comes forward. He speaks
hoarsely, quietly.

PREYSING
Flaemmchen!
(he seizes her to him)

She goes to his arms passively. He rubs his face in her hair.
She is passive -- cold.

PREYSING
(breathlessly)
You are late. I've been waiting for
you -- waiting.

FLAEMMCHEN
I had to arrange about the trip.

PREYSING
You're sweet.

FLAEMMCHEN
You think so?

He holds her again, trying to kiss her. She deliberately
avoids his kiss.

PREYSING
(awkwardly)
Come here.
(he sits heavily on
the bed, sitting on
her night dress.)

FLAEMMCHEN
Here, hold up!

Preysing rises while she pulls her night dress from under
him.

He draws her to him.

FLAEMMCHEN
Oh -- careful, Mr. Preysing.

PREYSING
Call me -- do you know -- would you --
would you like to call me by my first
name?

FLAEMMCHEN
(pulling away, glad
of an excuse for
conversation)
Oh, no.

PREYSING
Why not?

FLAEMMCHEN
I couldn't do that, you're a stranger
to me.

PREYSING
You're a funny little creature,
Flaemmchen. I can't make you out.

FLAEMMCHEN
It's not funny at all. One can't get
intimate just off hand. I could go
to England with you and everything
like that -- supposing I met you
next year and I said: 'How do you
do, Mr. Preysing! And you said:
(she imitates him)
'That was the young lady who was my
secretary in Manchester'.

Preysing laughs. She laughs.

FLAEMMCHEN
That's all quite proper.
(she is happy again.
She would rather
talk than be squeezed)
But supposing I met you when you
were with your wife and I called
out: "Hello you big baby -- remember
Manchester?' And you with your wife,
how would you like that?

There is a pause for a moment.

PREYSING
Please, Flaemmchen -- we'll leave my
wife out of this.

Flaemmchen yawns straight in his face.

FLAEMMCHEN
All right. I'll get undressed -- get
out.

He moves towards the windows which are open. She pushes his
fat body out, almost playfully, through the doors and onto
the balcony.

Preysing stands out on the balcony. He looks down in the
street below, then off. He starts suddenly because he sees a
shadow over the railing of his own balcony. He is puzzled.
Shadow crosses again. "Who can be in his room?" He moves
forward and peeps through the window. One side of the French
window is closed. From his angle we see the Baron furtively
searching the room. He is now wearing an overcoat, the collar
is turned up. Business ad lib. He finds Preysing's wallet.
He stuffs this in his overcoat pocket. Preysing's face
watching him. As Baron turns to exit, Preysing surges forward,
pulling the window after him. The two men face each other.

PREYSING
Aha! -- The Baron. What do you want
here?

BARON
I must have made a mistake.

PREYSING
Made a mistake -- remarkable. We
shall soon see if you made a mistake.
(the Baron starts to
leave.)
(bellowing)
Stay here... Give me that money.

The Baron hands him the pocketbook without a word.

PREYSING
So that's how we stand, Baron.

BARON
Look here, sir -- I'm completely at
your mercy -- I'm desperate -- it's
a matter of life or death -- I had
to get some money -- tonight.

PREYSING
Indeed you must, Baron -- you must.
Humm -- humm, but you must go to
jail, Baron, you're a thief.

BARON
Be quiet.

PREYSING
I'm going to call the police. I'm
going to watch you play the great
Baron with the police. Aristocrat!
Aristocrat!
(he picks up the
telephone)

The Baron makes for the door on the other side of the room,
pulls at the knob.

PREYSING
The door is locked, Baron.

The Baron makes one dive across the room. Preysing grasps at
his coat and tears it. With one hand holding the telephone,
(the receiver dropping on its cord towards the ground) and
one hand holding the Baron.

PREYSING
(into telephone)
Hello! Hello! --

BARON
Don't do that.
(he tries to snatch
the telephone from
Preysing.)

Preysing wrenches the telephone suddenly away from the Baron.
The action excites him.

PREYSING
Strike me, would you? Attack me would
you? Attack me --

With a terrific lunge, Preysing brings the telephone down
upon the Baron's head. The Baron sways, stunned. (as in book).
In his mad rage, Preysing, hits again with the telephone.

PREYSING
I'll strike you -- I'll strike you --
I'll strike you -- Strike me!

By this time the Baron is a heap on the floor. We see Preysing
come out of his blind trance. He even repeats again.

PREYSING
I strike you --
(with telephone
foolishly in his
hand, he looks down
at what he has done.)

CUT TO:

DOWNSTAIRS TELEPHONE ROOM

Sharp sound of buzzing.

Dozing night girl plugs in, lazily.

NIGHT GIRL
Yes -- yes -- Operator -- Operator --
(she listens -- says
to herself)
They are having a nice little game
up there with the telephone.

With nonchalance she flicks plug out again, as she does so:

CUT TO:

PREYSING'S ROOM

New angle. Preysing is on his feet. He has replaced the
receiver on the telephone, he is putting it back slowly. He
is terrified.

Door opens behind him.

Flaemmchen, with a dressing gown on, light, filmy thing,
crosses and looks down at the Baron, without a word. Preysing
seizes her.

Her hand goes to her head, her eyes roll; for a moment we
think she is going to faint right on top of the Baron. She
is trying to collect her senses, it cannot be true. We can
hear nothing but the heavy breathing of Preysing and the
traffic below.

Suddenly a motor horn in the street below sounds strident,
it is the first time we have been conscious of it.

With a swift movement, Flaemmchen dashes towards the door.
It is locked. She rushes back as if to cut through her own
room. He reaches for her and rips her dressing gown from
her, leaving her almost naked. He lunges after her. She tears
through her own room.

CUT TO:

CORRIDOR

Flaemmchen enters from her room. She looks this way and that.
After all, it is Flaemmchen and not Lillian Gish, running
across the ice in "Way Down East," -- it is Flaemmchen, a
Berlin girl. She pauses to try and clear her brain. "What
the hell is this -- what is it." The impulse naturally is to
scream in alarm. She doesn't -- Flaemmchen's don't. She looks
around. At the end of the passage is Kringelein's room. She
will go there. We watch her run down the passage uncertainly.
Without knocking she pushes open Kringelein's door.

CUT TO:

KRINGELEIN'S ROOM

It is in darkness. The only light comes through the windows.
The form of Kringelein lies prone upon the bed, the Doctor
had just thrown a coat over him. He is still in his trousers
and shirt.

Like a ghost, Flaemmchen, the shreds of her filmy clothes
hanging to her, crosses.

FLAEMMCHEN
(hoarse whisper)
Mr. Kringelein -- Mr. Kringelein --
where are you?

She sweeps to bed. She shakes him. Kringelein starts up.

FLAEMMCHEN
Quick -- Mr. Kringelein.

KRINGELEIN
Oh -- what -- what --
(he is looking up at
what seems to be a
ghost.)

She pulls on the light by the bed, it flames up on their
faces.

KRINGELEIN
Oh -- oh, Miss Flaemmchen. It's you --

FLAEMMCHEN
Quick -- something awful -- awful
has happened. Go -- go at once, --
Mr. Preysing --

KRINGELEIN
Preysing?

It occurs to him that this girl with her torn clothes must
have been roughly treated by Preysing. He suddenly assumes a
strength.

FLAEMMCHEN
Oh, don't wait -- go -- it's awful --
it's awful.

She slides down to the floor, by the side of the bed.

Kringelein climbs out of bed, tries to help her up.

KRINGELEIN
Stay here.

She waves him away.

FLAEMMCHEN
Don't wait now -- go -- Preysing.

Kringelein assumes suddenly a strength. He is a man for a
crisis -- he forgets that he was ever ill -- he leaves.

WE GO WITH HIM. CUT HIM DOWN CORRIDOR QUICKLY. He pauses
outside Preysing's door, uncertain of the rooms, then he
knocks.

KRINGELEIN
(calling)
Mr. Preysing -- Oh, Mr. Preysing --

He feels there must be a mistake -- he steps back, sees
Flaemmchen's door open next to it. He enters.

CUT HIM THROUGH:

FLAEMMCHEN'S ROOM

He enters. Looks around. Looks through bathroom. Goes quickly
forward.

CUT INTO REVERSE:

PREYSING'S ROOM

Preysing is still leaning against the table, his mouth is
open, he is gaping -- stunned. The two hundred and four pounds
has collapsed and sagged. He is staring, his victim lying --
a heap upon the floor, very still and quiet. His eyes come
around as Kringelein enters.

Kringelein crosses, looks down. Touches the Baron's hand.

KRINGELEIN
Oh -- the Baron -- the Baron.

PREYSING
He tried to rob me -- he is dead --

KRINGELEIN
My best friend -- poor, Baron --
dead -- just like that.

PREYSING
-- We must do something...

KRINGELEIN
(quickly)
Yes, the police must be called.

PREYSING
No -- no -- wait -- the man was a
burglar -- he was going to steal my
money.

KRINGELEIN
Oh, no -- no -- not the Baron.

PREYSING
(suddenly)
Where is that girl -- she was working
with him -- she enticed me into her
room.

KRINGELEIN
Her room -- oh -- I see, Mr. Preysing --
I understand, Mr. General Director
Preysing.

PREYSING
(frantically)
I can answer for this, it was self-
defense -- I can answer for this --
but that girl -- the scandal -- my
wife -- my daughters, you know them?

KRINGELEIN
Yes, I know them --

PREYSING
The scandal -- we are men -- you --
you could take that affair of the
young lady upon yourself -- take her
and hold your tongue. Then you can
travel -- I'll give you anything --
anything -- she was with you.

KRINGELEIN
We must call the police, your
excellency.

Preysing takes him by the shoulders.

PREYSING
How much -- how much do you want --
you need money -- you have nothing.

KRINGELEIN
Don't worry about me, Mr. General
Director Pryesing -- worry about
yourself.
(he picks up receiver)
There has been a murder -- this is
room one sixty-four.

CUT TO:

TELEPHONE ROOM

Telephone girl plugs in.

GIRL
Hello -- hurry up... hurry up...
someone in one sixty-four says there
has been a murder.

CUT TO:

HALL PORTER

The scene gradually grows intense. Porter calls night man.

PORTER
Here - quick - here -- go to one
sixty-four immediately.
(calls back on
telephone)
Give me Mr. Rohna -- Rohna the
manager.

CUT TO:

ROHNA'S ROOM

Darkened room. Bell ringing. Rohna sits up in bed, turns on
light, picks up telephone; on his face we see him hear the
news.

ROHNA
Where?... murder?... who?... all
right, I'm coming. Wait a minute.
(speaks in a monotone)
Instruct everyone to use the utmost
tact -- we must have no scandal in
the Grand Hotel. Answer no questions,
I'm coming now -- inform the police.

(he replaces the telephone commences dressing quickly)

CUT TO:

GRUSINSKAYA'S ROOM

Trunks standing around everywhere. Suzette is finishing
packing. Grusinskaya is sitting in front of the mirror in a
loose night wrap -- she is doing her hair.

SUZETTE
Madam should sleep.

GRUSINSKAYA
I've done my hair differently -- do
you like that?

SUZETTE
When a lady falls in love she does
her hair differently.

GRUSINSKAYA
(rising)
In the middle of the night -- those
flowers make me think of a funeral.
Laurels and tube-roses.
(she pushes the window
closed, shivers, it
is chilly. She crosses
the room turning out
one of the lights)
Oh, think, Suzette -- the Villa and
the sun at Tremezzo -- quiet -- simple --
happy -- we'll have a guest, Suzette.

SUZETTE
(quietly)
Yes, Madam. And now Madam will sleep.
It is not long 'till the train.

GRUSINSKAYA
Goodnight, Suzette.

Suzette leaves -- turning out a light.

Alone, Grusinskaya goes to the telephone. She raises the
receiver.

GRUSINSKAYA
Hello -- can you tell me if Baron
von Gaigern is in his room -- ring
him.
(talking to herself)
Cherie, I must wake you or you'll
miss the train.
(into phone)
...yes... are you ringing, he may be
asleep.
(to herself)
Cherie, you must get up and fetch me
from my room -- I'm longing for you,
Cherie -- I have not been to sleep --
I kept thinking you would come to
me.
(into phone)
...Oh, but he must answer. Ring --
ring -- ring.

CUT IN HERE at discretion the:

BARON'S EMPTY ROOM

Telephone is ringing.

CUT BACK TO:

GRUSINSKAYA'S ROOM

GRUSINSKAYA
(to herself)
Cherie, hurry -- hurry -- hurry.
Answer the phone -- what is the
matter.
(into phone)
Ring him -- ring him.
(to herself)
Where are you -- where are you,
Cherie? Why don't you answer?
(into phone)
Well, ring him -- please -- please.

FADE OUT SLOWLY:

END OF SEQUENCE "#6"

SEQUENCE "#7"

Music up as we --

FADE IN ON:

DISSOLVE INTO - EXTERIOR SERVICE ENTRANCE OF HOTEL

The trees and the milk cart effect and other curious signs
of dawn, which we remember after the climax of the first
sequence.

Music cold and eerie.

DISSOLVE OUT:

General early morning bustle and activity.

From one van, fruit and vegetables are being unloaded. From
another, huge hind quarters of beef are being carried in and
in a monotonous way a baker throws two loaves at a time, to
another man, from a van backed up --

BAKER
(counting)
Forty-two -- forty-four -- forty-six --
forty-eight -- fifty -- fifty-two --

Waiters coming to work. A noisy racket.

Sandwiched between the bread and butcher vans, is backed a
hearse.

At the moment we come upon it, the men are pausing in their
work to glance. The men take off their caps, as; proceeded
by the hotel detective and others, who will be there, the
corpse of the Baron in the basket, used at such time, is
brought out and placed in the hearse, which drives noisily
away. A policeman rides with the driver on the box.

By this time the man with the bread is counting:

BAKER
One hundred and eight -- one hundred
and ten -- one hundred and twelve...

Stay with him for a moment.

DISSOLVE OUT:

DISSOLVE INTO - EXTERIOR FRONT OF HOTEL

Shooting onto door - day lighting.

A man comes out and signals a black closed limousine, which
pulls forward.

DISSOLVE OUT:

DISSOLVE INTO - MAIN HOTEL LOBBY

Early morning. Sense of chill and desolation. Some chairs
stand on tables. A vacuum cleaner is at work on the carpets.
Newspaper boys are delivering papers at the news stand. The
various shops are slowly being opened, the windows being
cleaned.

The general feeling of the beginning of another day.

THE CAMERA waits at a distance shooting from door as Preysing,
with a plain clothes man on either side of him, leaves, moving
towards THE CAMERA. He is grim, his hat is drawn over his
eyes. His hands deep in his pockets. When he has passed the
CAMERA MOVES FORWARD TO:

SENF'S DESK

(the old shot) Meierheim is entering quickly goes through
the door.

He crosses now to Pimenov. They talk eagerly out of earshot.
But it is apparent that Meierheim is, as usual, in a hurry.

Rohna is there too. One of the men carries a telephone stand,
wrapped loosely in paper. But we know it's the telephone
stand.

Senf comes on duty, looks around, it is apparent that he is
late.

CLERK
The night clerk has already gone --
you are late.

SENF
Man -- I was at the clinic the whole
night -- there are no words to
describe what my wife suffered.

CLERK
And the child isn't coming?

SENF
No -- no -- not yet. Well, I mustn't
let it interfere with my duty. Any
news here?

CLERK
News? Yes -- killing in number one-
sixty-four.

SENF
What? -- Who? -- Whom?

CLERK
The big manufacturer killed Baron
von Gaigern.

SENF
Good heavens. What for?

CLERK
I don't know.

SENF
Man -- that's terrible. He was a
nice fellow -- I am sorry about him.

CLERK
It seems that he was a thief and an
imposter.

SENF
I don't believe it -- he was a real
gentleman. I know people... I'm so
tired I can hardly see out of my
eyes. No sleep for two nights and so
many duties and now this killing in
the hotel -- that means a lot of
work. But it's too bad about the
Baron, you always felt better when
he came along -- always friendly --
such an agreeable fellow.

CLERK
Most imposters are --

A number of bellboys march up and form a line. Senf comes
from behind the desk and inspects them.

SENF
Good morning.

BOYS
(in chorus)
Good morning.

SENF
Show your hands.

They show their hands.

SENF
(to one boy)
You have dirty nails -- you little
pig -- you're no good... Caps off! --
Let's see your hair.
(Boys take off their
caps)
Good -- caps on!
(Boys put on their
caps)
Where is number seven?... Not here?
(to clerk)
Take his name -- if he comes late
again today, he's fired. Dismissed!

The boys sit down on the bench.

THE CAMERA MOVES TO KRINGELEIN.

Kringelein and the police officer move towards the desk in
ear shot.

KRINGELEIN
Please, officer.

OFFICER
That will be sufficient for the
present, sir, you may travel in peace.

Kringelein exits.

CUT TO:

CORRIDOR BY ELEVATOR

As Kringelein emerges from the elevator, Suzette speaking to
the Floor Clerk.

SUZETTE
And they've taken him away.

FLOOR CLERK
Yes -- it's terrible.

SUZETTE
Madam must not know -- you understand --
Madam must not know.

FLOOR CLERK
I will tell the maids. I cannot answer
for downstairs --

Suzette hurries down corridor. By this time Kringelein has
arrived at his door, he opens it.

CUT TO:

KRINGELEIN'S ROOM

Kringelein opens the door and enters. Flaemmchen is looking
into space. A lovely picture. Morning light over her hair,
she is dressed.

KRINGELEIN
What's the matter?

FLAEMMCHEN
Oh -- I was thinking -- Poor Baron --
Lying there, his eyes so open.

KRINGELEIN
You loved the Baron, didn't you?

FLAEMMCHEN
Yes --

KRINGELEIN
So did I. He was friendly to me as
no man ever was.

FLAEMMCHEN
Perhaps he really was a burglar --
But they don't kill a man for that.

KRINGELEIN
He was in desperate straits. He'd
been trying to raise money all day.
He laughed -- Poor devil! And then a
man like Preysing kills him.

FLAEMMCHEN
(naively)
I didn't like Preysing right off.

KRINGELEIN
Then why did you have anything to do
with him?

FLAEMMCHEN
(simply)
Money!

KRINGELEIN
Yes, of course, -- money!

FLAEMMCHEN
You don't understand that do you?

KRINGELEIN
Of course I do -- I never knew what
money really meant till I started
spending it. Do you know --
(he is silent a moment)
I can hardly believe that anything
so beautiful should come to me from
Preysing -- I'll take care of you.
Will -- will you let me?

FLAEMMCHEN
What?

KRINGELEIN
You'll have a good time with me.
Want to? I've got enough money. Ten
thousand two hundred in my pocketbook.
Three thousand four hundred that I
won. It will last a long time. I can
win more -- we'll travel.

FLAEMMCHEN
Yes -- to Paris? I wanted to go there
always.

KRINGELEIN
Wherever you like. Here I'll give
you the money I won, three thousand
four hundred. Later you can have
more.

FLAEMMCHEN
Later?

KRINGELEIN
When I -- I'm ill, Flaemmchen -- It
will not be long -- I'll not last
long. Will you stay with me until...

FLAEMMCHEN
Nonsense! We'll find a great doctor,
he'll cure you. They can cure anything
these days.

KRINGELEIN
Do you believe that you will have a
better time with me than you would
with Preysing?

FLAEMMCHEN
Oh yes, of course.

KRINGELEIN
(takes her hands)
Do you like me better?

FLAEMMCHEN
You're a good man, Mr. Kringelein --
a very good man.

Kringelein straightens, happy, inspired, a smile on his face.
He assumes in his gestures. Takes the telephone.

KRINGELEIN
(into telephone)
When is the next train leaving for
Paris? -- Yes... Get two tickets for
me... and my bill please... and the
lady's -- Miss Flaemm's.
(puts down telephone)
(to Flaemmchen)
We have to hurry let's pack -- we'll
have breakfast on the train.

CUT TO:

CORRIDOR

The figure of Grusinskaya is standing at her door, there is
no one with her. Suzette steps out.

SUZETTE
Madam, it is Mr. Meierheim -- he is
waiting downstairs.

GRUSINSKAYA
Where is Pimenov? Where is Pimenov?
(she looks off.)

FLASH OF PIMENOV

coming out of the elevator.

Grusinskaya hurries down to Pimenov -- they meet.

PIMENOV
(breathlessly)
He will be on the train.

GRUSINSKAYA
But when did he go? How do you know?

She crosses and looks in the Baron's room. A maid is there
changing the bedding. The room is unoccupied otherwise.

GRUSINSKAYA
Baron von Gaigern has left?

The maid nods.

GRUSINSKAYA
When? How long ago?

Maid shrugs her shoulders.

VOICE OF FLOOR CLERK
The Baron left about half an hour
ago, Madam.

PIMENOV
Oh -- Gru -- come, come -- we'll
lose the train.

While they are waiting for the elevator Grusinskaya is like
a live electric wire.

The elevator arrives. They are stepping in.

CUT TO:

LOBBY

General activity. We hear the cry go up:

VOICE
Madam Grusinskaya's car...

Grusinskaya comes out of the elevator followed by Suzette
and Pimenov. Meierheim meets her.

MEIERHEIM
Come along, oh, Madam, come along.
The train will be going.

GRUSINSKAYA
Wait a minute. I've got to ask myself.

PIMENOV
What's the use of asking, Gru -- he
is at the train -- He will be there.

MEIERHEIM
The troupe, the scenery, everything --
all on board, waiting. You have a
rehearsal in Vienna tomorrow morning.
Come, Madam, are you mad?

Grusinskaya crosses to the desk. She speaks to Senf.

GRUSINSKAYA
Have you seen Baron von Gaigern?

ROHNA
(comes over quickly)
The Baron is not here, Madam.

GRUSINSKAYA
He is gone?

ROHNA
Yes, Madam.

MEIERHEIM
Four minutes past. Please come.

PIMENOV
Come, Lisaveta, he will be there --
he will be there.

MEIERHEIM
(calling)
Madam Grusinskaya's car.

Grusinskaya, followed by the others, sweeps out towards the
door.

CUT TO:

EXTERIOR HOTEL

Grusinskaya emerges, followed by the others. The sunlight
hits them.

GRUSINSKAYA
Oh, the sun -- it will be sunny in
Tremezzo --

MEIERHEIM
Every seat for the opening has been
sold at Vienna. Sold out for three
days.

GRUSINSKAYA
I know -- I know -- but it will be
sunny in Tremezzo. We'll have a guest
then.

SUZETTE
(knowingly)
Yes, Madam.

VOICE
Madam Grusinskaya's car.

Grusinskaya moves forward.

CUT TO:

LOBBY

SENF
(at telephone)
Grand Hotel, Head Porter. What?
There's been -- a child born? A boy!
Yes! My child born! It is healthy...
and my wife? Doing well -- all well!
(to Clerk)
The child has come. They are both
alive. My child...

CUT TO:

BY ELEVATOR

At this moment Kringelein and Flaemmchen are coming out of
the elevator, Kringelein is carrying his suitcase.

A bellboy attempts to take his bag but Kringelein, still
confused draws his hand with the suitcase away from the
bellboy.

FLAEMMCHEN
Let him take it.

BELLBOY
Your bag, your Excellency --

Hearing the word 'Excellency' Kringelein goes through a
transformation. He stands and with a flourish hands the
suitcase over to the boy. He is a big man now.

KRINGELEIN
(very definitely to
boy)
Cab please!

BELLBOY
Cab, for his Excellency, Mr.
Kringelein!

KRINGELEIN
(to Flaemmchen)
And now we travel, Flaemmchen...
Glad?

FLAEMMCHEN
Am I!

KRINGELEIN
(to Senf)
Is the bill ready -- the lady's too?

SENF
At once. Any forwarding address, Mr.
Kringelein?

KRINGELEIN
Yes, Paris -- Grand Hotel.

FLAEMMCHEN
How do you know there is a Grand
Hotel?

KRINGELEIN
Oh, there must be one in Paris...
They have everything in Paris.

SENF
Your bill, Your Excellency.

Kringelein pays and taking Flaemmchen's arm starts to move
away from the desk, General business ad lib of tipping. Boys
line up, making a deep bow. There is almost a triumphant
march as Kringelein and Flaemmchen move towards the door.

SENF CLERK BOYS
(in chorus)
Come again, your Excellency.

With head erect, happy smile on his face, Kringelein leaves
the lobby. Normal activity in lobby, reminding us of opening
scene. Doctor comes up to desk.

DOCTOR
Was that Mr. Kringelein leaving?

THE END

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