"Deadwood"

Episode Two

Written by

Malcolm MacRury

"Deep Water"















Production # P102
(Script # S108)

Production Draft
June 24, 2003
July 11, 2003 Blue
July 16, 2003 Pink
July 24, 2003 Yellow
Aug. 29, 2003 Green


"Deadwood"

Episode Two

CAST



Seth Bullock
Al Swearengen
Sol Star
Alma Garret
Wild Bill Hickok
Jane
Doc Cochran
Tom Nuttall
Trixie
Brom Garret
Dan Dority
Charlie Utter
Ellsworth
E.B. Farnum
Jack McCall
A.W. Merrick
H.W. Smith
Johnny Burns
Jimmy Irons
Lou Varnes
Mr. Wu
The Metz child
Jewel
Persimmon Phil
Con Stapleton
Tom Mason
Whore #1
Whore #2
Whore #3


"Deadwood"

Episode Two

SETS



INTERIORS

Bullock's and Star's Tent
The Gem
Saloon
Swearengen's Office
Whore's Room
Swearengen's Bedroom
Grand Central Hotel
Dining Room
Lobby
Hickok's Room
Garret's Room
Driscoll's Old Room
Nuttall's Number Ten
Doc Cochran's Office
Utter and Hickok's Wagon


EXTERIORS

Mr. Wu's
Main Street
Street (Smith's coffin-building)
Doc Cochran's Office
Claim Number Nine above Discovery
Deadwood Graveyard
Nuttall's Number Ten
Woods
Camp (Ellsworth)
Alley


DEADWOOD EPISODE TWO

FADE IN:

EXT. MR. WU'S - DAY

Wu, muckraking outside his pigpen, always glad to see a
Caucasian in logistical difficulty, considers the labored
approach of E.B. Farnum, who, harassed by a mongrel cur,
wheels an overloaded laundry-trundle through the deep-rutted
goop. The winded hotelier unloads the piled linens into Wu's
wash-tub --

FARNUM
(to Wu)
Wash-ee.

When removed from the trundle, the last of the sheets,
bloodied, reveals Tim Driscoll's quartered corpse. The dog
yaps with deepened yearning. Farnum, raising his gaze from
Driscoll's body to Wu, indicates the pigs --

FARNUM
Eat-ee.

Wu understands. Farnum looks from the pigs to he dog to
Driscoll's remains --

FARNUM
His dog-ee.
(points to the pigs)
Them eat-ee dog-ee too --

Farnum lacks intellectual rigor to pursue further the logic
of pidgin grammar --

FARNUM
-- or eat-ee him yourself you leering
Heathen.

Hand to the trundle for balance, Farnum yanks his left boot
out of the goop's suction, moving off as the cur keeps
barking, and the CAMERA HOLDS ON, among the trundle's
unspeakable contents, Driscoll's face --

CUT TO:

CLOSE ON SWEARENGEN

seen from a further remove but at the same angle as Driscoll,
eyes coming open, a vigilance immediately animating him,
getting him to his feet, to his piss-pot, hurrying his
pissing; he looks to the sleeping Trixie, comes to the side
of the bed, takes up the gun Trixie has laid there; wakes
her up --

SWEARENGEN
(re the gun)
Was this for me?

TRIXIE
I brought it for you.

Their eyes hold a beat, then --

SWEARENGEN
Get out.

He holds her sleeping gown out to her. She rises, naked,
takes the gown. As she pulls it over her head he pushes her
toward the door, grabbing up his suspendered pants --

CUT TO:

INT. THE GEM - SALOON - FIRST FLOOR - DAY

where Jewel is sweeping. Swearengen comes down the stairs --

SWEARENGEN
Coffee.

She heads for the kitchen. Farnum's entered --

FARNUM
(carefully)
'Morning Al.

SWEARENGEN
I'd like someone to tell me what in
fuck is going forward in this camp.

FARNUM
Tim Driscoll's checked out -- I can
tell you that much.

This placates Swearengen --

SWEARENGEN
Left your hotel has he?

FARNUM
Moved to Wu's pigsty.

-- but only briefly --

SWEARENGEN
And what was that shootout about?

FARNUM
At sunup?

SWEARENGEN
Yes at fucking sunup.

FARNUM
'Far as I heard Al, Hickok and one
of them hardware guys you're renting
to threw down on the fella 'brought
word in of that Squarehead family's
massacre -- suspected he was in on
the kill.

SWEARENGEN
What's it to Hickok or that hardware
guy either how them Squareheads come
to die?

FARNUM
I couldn't agree with you more.

Jewel returns with Swearengen's coffee --

SWEARENGEN
If you don't stop dragging that
fucking leg.

JEWEL
(to Farnum)
Coffee?

FARNUM
I might have one cup.

He glances sideways at Swearengen to make sure this is okay --

FARNUM
(to Swearengen)
Did you know one Squarehead lived?
Little Squarehead girl. They took
her to the Doc's.

SWEARENGEN
In what condition?

FARNUM
I don't know Al.
(beat)
If she was to make it wouldn't she
have a story to tell.

CLOSE ON SWEARENGEN

features working, vigilant, as when he awoke, against a still-
encroaching fear --

CUT TO:

CLOSE ON BULLOCK

no less haunted then Swearengen, seen in a shaving mirror.
His cheeks are lathered, though he hasn't brought the razor
to his face; instead observes in the mirror's reflection one
prospector enacting for another, while glancing in Bullock's
direction, Bullock's and Hickok's shooting of End Mason. He
starts involuntarily at --

STAR (O.S.)
Should we test that hotel's kitchen
Seth?

ANGLE - STAR

returning to their tent from his ablutions at the creek.
Bullock towels off the lather --

BULLOCK
I'll meet you.

ON Star, as Bullock moves away --

CUT TO:

EXT. STREET - DAY

Rev. Smith is carpentering a coffin, kibbitzed by a seemingly
idle Johnny Burns. They note Bullock's passage --

SMITH
Men like Mr. Seth Bullock there raise
a camp up.

BURNS
(indicates the coffin)
Fella going to be staying in that
box might argue with you Reverend.

SMITH
Mr. Bullock did not draw first. And
I point to his commissioning me to
build The Departed a coffin, and see
to his Christian burial.

BURNS
Any idea on The Departed's name?

SMITH
In his effects I found a letter
addressed to Tom Mason --

BURNS
I know a Tom Mason but this ain't
him.

SMITH
(patiently)
-- which, having prayed, I decided
to open. The sender, Mrs. Walter
Mason, writes "I have asked your
brother Ned to bear this to you,"
from which I conclude The Departed's
name is Ned.

BURNS
Ned Mason, huh?

SMITH
Possibly the Tom Mason you know is
the dead man's brother. If he's in
the camp he should be notified.

BURNS
No, I ain't seen Tom around.

Burns sustains his innocuous tone, but averts his gaze from
the minister --

CUT TO:

EXT. DOC COCHRAN'S OFFICE - DAY

Jane, a blanket around her shoulders, sleeps sitting against
the side of Cochran's small, rough-hewn cabin, splay-legged
like an unmastered puppet. Cochran's come out --

COCHRAN
Wake up.

Jane does, getting to her feet --

JANE
How's that Little One?

COCHRAN
Still among us.

JANE
I'm asking you what her prospects
are.

Cochran lets himself trust a fellow outcast --

COCHRAN
If her wounds don't fester she might
could have a fighting chance.

-- and Jane's feeling for the child permits a brief, blessed
breaking-free from the manacling belligerence of her own
personality --

JANE
Good.

Cochran notes Bullock's approach --

COCHRAN
Nothing of that to him.

JANE
He's all right.

COCHRAN
(insistent)
Not a word.

Bullock's reached them, tips his hat to Jane --

BULLOCK
'Morning.

JANE
'Morning Bullock.

BULLOCK
I was wondering how that child fared.

COCHRAN
It's iffy. Touch and go. I'm not
optimistic.

BULLOCK
Has she spoken?

COCHRAN
No. She's not conscious. I'd be
surprised if she ever is.

Ordinarily, Bullock, the former lawman, might be made
suspicious by such over-emphatic insistence; in this instance
he discounts it as irritable misanthropy --

BULLOCK
I'd like to hear, whichever way it
goes.

Cochran nods, looking away. Bullock tips his hat to Jane --

JANE
If you see Bill Hickok or that sore-
asshole Charlie Utter, could you say
I looked to the stock?

BULLOCK
Sure. I'll let 'em know.

When he's gone --

JANE
You're wrong not to trust him. He
formed the party that found this
Little One, among all the dead of
her family.

COCHRAN
Didn't he? And didn't he shoot a man
he suspected in the murders? And if
I confided, wouldn't he circulate my
optimism? Wouldn't he say "When that
Little One speaks you'll find out I
was right -- not the Sioux 'killed
her family but road-agents."

Cochran turns to her --

COCHRAN
And s'pose it was road-agents, and
they hear his talk. Where does the
Little One stand then?

Grudgingly, Jane acknowledges a sense in this --

JANE
You got a dark turn of mind.

COCHRAN
I see more misery out of them moving
to justify theirselves as them that
set out to do harm.

Off which --

CUT TO:

INT. GRAND CENTRAL HOTEL - DINING ROOM - DAY

Utter and Hickok preparing their breakfasts at the hotel's
version of a buffet. Star's seated at one of the tables b.g.
Utter rejects the first roll he's selected --

UTTER
Same dead roach in the same damn
biscuit.

A hungover Hickok agrees --

HICKOK
He stuck to his position.

Bullock enters --

BULLOCK
(to Hickok)
'Morning.

HICKOK
'Morning Montana.

Hickok doesn't trust his hand with the coffee pot. Utter
quickly takes it up --

UTTER
(to Bullock)
Joe?

BULLOCK
Much obliged.

As Utter pours --

BULLOCK
(to Hickok)
Your friend asked me to say she's
looked to your stock.

HICKOK
Thanks.

BULLOCK
She's back now keeping watch on that
child we found.

Hickok studies Bullock unimposingly --

BULLOCK
'Far as her chances, the Doc's not
optimistic.

HICKOK
From the look of him, would you think
that Doc's been wrong once or twice
in his life?

Which brings from Bullock an appreciative grin --

BULLOCK
Maybe once or twice.

Utter senses that his friend's contact with Bullock elevates
Hickok's spirits, calls after Bullock as he drifts toward
Star's table --

UTTER
We'll likely be by your tent later --

STAR
Good.

UTTER
-- get Bill here outfitted with some
prospecting gear.

FOLLOW Hickok and Utter as they move toward their table --

HICKOK
Don't do that Charlie.

UTTER
Do what?

HICKOK
Trumpet my intentions -- herd me
like a damn steer.

UTTER
(defensive)
Ain't you here to prospect for gold?

Hickok busies himself with his bacon --

UTTER
If you're just going to gamble Bill
let's get it said -- I'll arrange
appearance money for you at one of
these joints.

HICKOK
That ain't gambling -- it's shilling
for the house.

UTTER
It's getting you a regular damn source
of income --

Utter notes the arrival in the room of the newspaperman
Merrick, lowers his voice --

UTTER
-- so this don't wind up like
Cheyenne.

ANGLE - BULLOCK AND STAR

at their table, also noting Merrick's arrival, his serving
himself at the buffet --

STAR
(re the child)
You did your part Seth. She wouldn't
have lived the night.

Bullock wants to let it go --

BULLOCK
What offer should we make on the
purchase of that lot?

STAR
That barber next to us paid six
hundred for his lot ten days ago.

BULLOCK
Seller's market.

STAR
(nods)
I'd say we're well-bought at seven-
fifty and we don't go past a thousand.

They register Merrick's approach --

MERRICK
May I join you? There's nowhere else
to sit.

They make room. Merrick, taking a chair, addresses Bullock,
voice raised so Hickok will hear --

MERRICK
Well Mr. Bullock. After the events
of last night, for an ink-stained
wretch like me to come upon you and
Mr. Hickok in the same dining room
is luck indeed.

Bullock meets his eyes --

BULLOCK
I don't want to talk about last
night's events.

MERRICK
I see. Fair enough. I know how to
pocket my notebook sir.

As they commence to eat --

MERRICK
These same wretched biscuits.

Off which --

CUT TO:

INT. GRAND CENTRAL HOTEL - LOBBY - DAY

Farnum's behind his desk. Alma Garret descends --

FARNUM
Mrs. Garret.

ALMA
Mister Farnum.

Alma joins him. He can see she's jonesing, smells money --

FARNUM
I hope you slept well.

ALMA
As it happens, I did not.

FARNUM
I'm very sorry. Do you require the
Doctor?

ALMA
Yes. Please.

Alma gives him some dough --

FARNUM
Certainly ma'am. Of course. Sorry
you're poorly again.

She walks on. HOLD ON Farnum, exhibiting the predator's
innocent pleasure at sighting weakened prey --

FARNUM
(to himself)
Somebody's low on dope.

Off which --

CUT TO:

INT. GRAND CENTRAL HOTEL - DINING ROOM - DAY

The men rise at Alma's stiff-moving entrance. She nods
perfunctory, polite acknowledgment as they resume their seats --

ANGLE - MERRICK, BULLOCK AND STAR

Merrick watches her prepare her breakfast plate --

MERRICK
That is Mrs. Alma Garret, whose
husband, I'm told, while standing at
the bar of Al Swearengen's Saloon,
bought a gold claim last night for
twenty thousand dollars.

STAR
We rent a lot from Al Swearengen.

MERRICK
I'm not surprised to hear it Sir.

Merrick's distracted, looking around the room --

MERRICK
Tim Driscoll, the claim's seller,
lives here at the hotel. He must be
sleeping in.

ANGLE - HICKOK

watching Alma's hands shake as she pours her coffee. He
recognizes a fellow sufferer. She feels Hickok's eyes on
her, doesn't look up --

CUT TO:

EXT. CLAIM NUMBER NINE ABOVE DISCOVERY - DAY

Brom, with Dority's half-hearted assistance, pans his claim
for gold. Ellsworth's come by --

ELLSWORTH
'Morning boys.

DORITY
Ellsworth.

ELLSWORTH
(to Brom)
Name's Ellsworth. I hear you bought
these digs.

BROM
(nods)
Brom Garret. How do you do.

ELLSWORTH
My claim's one over.

BROM
(miserable)
I see.

ELLSWORTH
Cleaning up any yellow?

DORITY
(feigned optimism)
Day's young.

BROM
(to Ellsworth)
How's it running at your claim?

ELLSWORTH
I've met my quota for whiskey, pussy
and food.

DORITY
Get on over to the Gem then Ellsworth.

ELLSWORTH
(to Brom)
Further efforts'll only benefit the
faro dealers.

BROM
This exact spot showed a fistful of
nuggets two night ago.

ELLSWORTH
Don't weaken Pilgrim. 'Tween nuggets
and nothing she's usually going to
show you some flake.

He's gone. Brom glumly resumes his efforts --

BROM
She hasn't even showed me any flake.

-- earning the fish-eye from Dority. Off which --

CUT TO:

INT. THE GEM - SALOON - DAY

Behind the bar, Swearengen, striving for patience, receives
Johnny Burns' report --

BURNS
"No," the Bible-thumper says, "the
dead man's named Ned Mason -- maybe
the Tom you know's his brother." "Oh
I doubt that, Reverend," I say, "the
Tom Mason I know's nowhere near here."

SWEARENGEN
Johnny.

BURNS
But what was I thinking? -- "Damned
if Al didn't center-shoot the bulls-
eye: 'wasn't Sioux killed them
Squareheads but Persimmon Phil, Tom
Mason, and the croaker headed for
this coffin, who must be some fuck-
up younger brother of Tom's."

Swearengen's noted the entrance of Bullock and Star --

SWEARENGEN
(to Burns)
Listen to me. Go get Doc Cochran.

Burns wants some love --

BURNS
And I never tipped the Thumper to
none of it Al. Played it dumb as a
pile of rocks.

SWEARENGEN
Bring the Doc. Say I want him to see
to the whores.

BURNS
All right Sir.

Burns, moving past the new arrivals, amiably acknowledges
their different paths --

BURNS
S'cuse me fellas.

BULLOCK
Mr. Swearengen?

SWEARENGEN
That's right.

STAR
Sol Star.

BULLOCK
Seth Bullock --

SWEARENGEN
How do you do men?

Bullock hands Swearengen twenty dollars in currency --

STAR
Rent on Lot Four.

Swearengen's eyes widen theatrically --

SWEARENGEN
Lot Four -- the hardware boys. I
want to buy you fellas a drink. You
do drink don't you?

Star finds something off-putting in the way this is asked --

STAR
Sure.

Swearengen's turned to collect a bottle --

SWEARENGEN
How's business on that lot? Hell of
a spot isn't it? Any more foot traffic
you'd have to call it a riot.

-- suddenly adopts a tone of exaggerated caution --

SWEARENGEN
I'm turning back slow, nothing in
hand but this whiskey bottle --

Star and Bullock exchange a look. Swearengen, turning now to
face them, grins amiably at Bullock as he fills the shot
glasses --

SWEARENGEN
-- they say you're not a man I'd
want mistaking my intentions.

Bullock's temper starts rising --

BULLOCK
Who says that? I'd like to ask 'em
what they mean.

STAR
That fella drew on Seth this morning.

SWEARENGEN
I never heard different.

BULLOCK
No one mistook his intentions.

SWEARENGEN
Let's leave it all alone. I'm
stupidest when I try to be funny.

A beat, then Bullock and Star both down their shots.
Swearengen refills their glasses --

SWEARENGEN
These're still free.
(to Bullock)
Sorry for hitting a nerve.

BULLOCK
We'd like to offer on that lot we're
renting.

SWEARENGEN
I'll sell my back teeth for the right
money.

STAR
Would six hundred get the job done?

SWEARENGEN
You've been talking to Kerrigan beside
you.

STAR
We met him to say hello.

SWEARENGEN
Values've went up since Kerrigan and
me did business. Folks pouring in
every day. I tear my hair and gnash
my teeth I sold to that barber so
cheap.

BULLOCK
What would you take for the lot?

SWEARENGEN
(considers)
I guess before I made a price I'd
want to know if you boys have unnamed
partners.

BULLOCK
Why?

SWEARENGEN
(to Star, benign)
I think specifically of Wild Bill
Hickok.
(to Bullock)
Didn't you and Hickok act together
in the street this morning?

STAR
We just met Wild Bill Hickok.

BULLOCK
(over Star, and to
him; re Swearengen)
What business of that is his?

The angrily flustered Bullock's garbling his thought prompts
a friendly smile from Swearengen --

SWEARENGEN
You mean what business of mine is
that.

Bullock's further goaded --

BULLOCK
Don't tell me what the fuck I mean.

Swearengen seems taken aback --

SWEARENGEN
That's not the tone to get a deal
done.

Star wants to get Bullock out, finds opportunity in the
entrance of two figures we'll come to know as Persimmon Phil
and Tom Mason --

STAR
(to Swearengen)
Should we sort it out another time?

SWEARENGEN
Sure.

STAR
(re new arrivals)
Thirsty people.

SWEARENGEN
(to Bullock)
And you and me'll find our proper
stride.

BULLOCK
All right.

Star expands on Bullock's minimal civility --

STAR
(to Swearengen)
Good luck on the day's trade.

Swearengen amplifies further --

SWEARENGEN
(to Star)
I won't even wish you luck, 'cause I
can tell you ain't the type that
needs it. I marked you for an earner
the minute you come in my sight --

Under which Bullock and Star have started away --

SWEARENGEN
(under his breath)
-- Jew bastard.

Swearengen's features transmute yet again as Persimmon Phil
and Tom Mason reach him --

SWEARENGEN
Two wayfarers, when I'd heard you
were three.

PERSIMMON PHIL
How 'you doing Al?

SWEARENGEN
Shall we all let's drink upstairs?

TOM
I can be persuaded.

Swearengen puts his arm around Tom --

SWEARENGEN
And will you have a whore Tom? Or
are you still staying true to that
heifer?

TOM
It's over with her and me.

PERSIMMON PHIL
He went sweet on a buffalo by Yankton.

SWEARENGEN
(to Tom)
Where's brother Neddy anyway?

TOM
(suddenly evasive)
Fuck if I know, that fucker.

Tom sees Trixie on the second floor --

TOM
I'll take her.

Swearengen's features are inscrutable --

SWEARENGEN
Pick another.

As they climb --

CUT TO:

EXT. MAIN STREET - DAY

Bullock and Star head toward their tent, Star watching his
friend stew silently. After a beat --

BULLOCK
I don't like that son-of-a-bitch.

STAR
Thank God you didn't let him see it.

BULLOCK
Calls me loose with a gun. Was he
there?

STAR
We'll just get the lot bought Seth
and have nothing more to do with
him. Buy the lot, then we give him a
wide berth.

Bullock stops, studies Star, lets him know he's aware he's
being handled --

BULLOCK
Or we could just forget about putting
money in the cocksucker's pocket.

Star meets his eyes --

STAR
It's a hell of a location, but we
could let the whole thing go.

A beat, then a compelling antagonism toward Swearengen beyond
will, logic, justice or injustice asserts itself in Bullock --

BULLOCK
No.

Smith's been standing outside their tent, noted their
approach, come to meet them --

SMITH
I've acted on your commission Mr.
Bullock -- built a coffin and dug a
grave.

BULLOCK
Thank you.

SMITH
(to both men)
Will you join me now for the burial
service?

It's just what Bullock and Star want to do --

CUT TO:

INT. GRAND CENTRAL HOTEL - HICKOK'S ROOM - DAY

Utter and Hickok in different corners of the room. Maybe
Hickok's looking out the window, Utter's seated at the edge
of the bed, looking in the opposite direction. After a beat --

UTTER
All's I was saying Bill, till you
start your prospecting, if you're
gonna gamble, let's get you protected
a little.

Hickok doesn't look back --

HICKOK
I know what you were saying.

UTTER
Extra business you bring a joint,
interruptions you stand for off folks
wanting to glad-hand, that all
deserves compensation.

HICKOK
Don't shop me to those places Charlie.

A knock --

FARNUM (O.S.)
E.B. Farnum gentlemen. Mr. Utter's
room is ready.

Utter rises, looks to his friend with saddened resignation --

UTTER
Go ahead and do it your way then
Bill.

Off Hickok, as Utter collects his valise and moves toward
the door --

TIME CUT TO:

INT. GRAND CENTRAL HOTEL - DRISCOLL'S OLD ROOM - DAY

E.B Farnum shows Charlie Utter into the murdered Tim
Driscoll's former room --

FARNUM
Cleaned and thoroughly aired --

Chuckling unctuously, Farnum gestures grandly toward the
open window --

FARNUM
-- the previous guest was Irish.

Utter just stares at him. Farnum decides not to linger, hands
Utter the key --

FARNUM
No tip necessary sir. I operate the
hotel.

Farnum exits. Off Utter, forlorn, sitting on the bed, taking
in the empty room, noting a blood-spot the circumference of
his hat brim on the floor beside the bed --

CUT TO:

INT. THE GEM - SWEARENGEN'S OFFICE - DAY

Swearengen and Persimmon Phil drink. Shouts and thumps against
walls announce Tom Mason's banging a prostitute in the
adjoining room --

PERSIMMON PHIL
Listen to Tom carry on.

Swearengen doesn't seem interested --

SWEARENGEN
Bad luck you wasn't here yesterday.

PERSIMMON PHIL
What did I miss?

SWEARENGEN
A Squarehead family leaving I could've
tipped you to. Heading back to
Minnesota.

PERSIMMON PHIL
Well off? Are they worth still trying
to catch?

SWEARENGEN
Sioux already caught 'em. Did for
'em last night on the road to
Spearfish.

PERSIMMON PHIL
Those heathen cocksuckers. So we
missed a good score.

Swearengen studies Persimmon Phil --

SWEARENGEN
Keep lying and I'll murder you in
that chair.

PERSIMMON PHIL
What's wrong Al? What're you talking
about?

Swearengen just stares at him. After a beat --

PERSIMMON PHIL
All right, I'm going to tell you
what happened, which is the God's
truth. We come on that family by
accident. No one was looking to hold
your end out or anything of the sort,
or conceal a goddamn thing.

Persimmon Phil, failing to dissemble his fear, produces a
leather pouch filled with gold dust --

PERSIMMON PHIL
You end, weighed to the ounce. And
my only problem, because we hadn't
cleared it with you... You know how
you get Al, you know that yourself,
so my problem was raising the subject.
I had it all weighed out.

He's put the pouch before Swearengen, who ignores it --

SWEARENGEN
You know why I get how I get?

PERSIMMON PHIL
You want to go over the job. You
don't like loose ends. I appreciate
that.

SWEARENGEN
I don't like messes, or things done
half-assed, or bags of shit left to
hold --

PERSIMMON PHIL
There was no loose ends Al, I
guarantee you that much.

SWEARENGEN
-- 'cause I've got a whole operation
to consider.

A beat. Persimmon Phil, shifting uneasily, hoping against
hope he's put matters to rest, reacts to a whoop --

PERSIMMON PHIL
Listen to Tom.

SWEARENGEN
One of the Squareheads lived.

PERSIMMON PHIL
No.

SWEARENGEN
No?

PERSIMMON PHIL
I'm saying it's hard to believe . I
mean I believe you, but we saw to
'em pretty good.

SWEARENGEN
They brought the kid back to camp.
It's over at the sawbones'.

PERSIMMON PHIL
Is it talking? Can it even speak
English? When we was seeing to 'em
they all screamed in Squarehead.

SWEARENGEN
Where's Ned Mason?

Persimmon Phil wipes his mouth --

PERSIMMON PHIL
What a fucking story that is Al, if
you only knew the fucking problem he
was.

Swearengen just stares. Persimmon Phil tries to get his spit
up --

PERSIMMON PHIL
Comes the Squareheads' time, Ned
spooks and rides off, as full as
Tom's and my hands were doing what
we had to do. So God knows where he's
got to.
(indicates pouch)
Anyways, your cut reflects he's out,
there's no cut in there for Ned.

SWEARENGEN
He came here.

PERSIMMON PHIL
No.

SWEARENGEN
Say "no" again I'll murder you where
you fucking sit.

PERSIMMON PHIL
He swore he'd head for Cheyenne.

SWEARENGEN
But here's closer, isn't it? -- and
every one of you cocksuckers goes
for the easiest chance.

PERSIMMON PHIL
So where's Ned now?

SWEARENGEN
Where he is now is he stirs the whole
camp up last night with his massacre
story, till I'm giving liquor away
and cunt at half-price to keep my
crowd controlled, and a party makes
up from Nuttall's to ride back out
to Spearfish -- Wild Bill Hickok and
them two guys 'walked past you
downstairs and several other meddling
pains-in-the-balls that save the
Squarehead kid and tell Ned to Stick
around till they see what the kid
has to say about him.

PERSIMMON PHIL
Wild Bill Hickok?

SWEARENGEN
And Ned throws down.

PERSIMMON PHIL
(incredulous)
Against Wild Bill Hickok.

SWEARENGEN
Against Hickok and this other
cocksucker that draws almost as fast,
so it's a toss-up who blew Ned's
head off.

PERSIMMON PHIL
Jesus Christ Al. I'm sorry for all
the bother.

SWEARENGEN
You let Ned run, leave a Squarehead
alive, and me to clean up the mess.
Those were the only loose ends.

PERSIMMON PHIL
I want you to take my share. Honest
to fucking Christ --

Swearengen gets to his feet, approaches Persimmon Phil --

SWEARENGEN
I don't want your share, and I don't
want that kid telling people in
English or Squarehead or drawing
pictures in the shit with twigs how
it wasn't Indians killed her people
but whites.

Swearengen punches Persimmon Phil in the ear, knocks him to
the floor sideways --

SWEARENGEN
This camp could be up for grabs. God
knows what these cocksuckers are
here for, Hickok and the rest, and
what I'm going to have to do about
it. And just when I need to keep my
head clear, you give me these shit-
bags to hold.

Swearengen looks up as, from the next room, Tommy Mason shouts
announcement of his orgasm --

TOMMY (O.S.)
Yahoo! Yahoo!

Swearengen's mouth is at Persimmon Phil's ear --

SWEARENGEN
I should cut you fucking throat for
you.

PERSIMMON PHIL
Please. Don't cut my throat. Let me
help you straighten it out.

A pounding on the door. Swearengen's eyes never leave
Persimmon Phil as he admits Tommy Mason, who stands before
them, pants around his ankles, wielding a fistful of prick --

TOM
That snatch is branded!

SWEARENGEN
Attaboy Tom.

Swearengen looks in at the adjoining room's open door to see
the sullen, bedraggled whore --

TOM
She's branded with the Flying T!

SWEARENGEN
Attaboy. Put your iron away now.

Swearengen, patting Tom on the back, moves past him into his
own office --

SWEARENGEN
(to Persimmon Phil)
All right. You help me straighten it
out.

Off which --

CUT TO:

INT. DOC COCHRAN'S OFFICE - DAY

Cochran and Jane flank the Norwegian child, who lies, eyes-
closed, on a wooden pallet. Jane's customary preemptive
belligerence is tempered by sheepish appreciation as Cochran
supervises her poulticing of the child's leg wounds. A knock
on the door --

BURNS (O.S.)
Doc, you'll get me in Dutch with Al.

Cochran addresses the door --

COCHRAN
Just another damn moment.
(to Jane, re the
dressing)
Don't press down -- just lay it on
light.

JANE
If it look like I'm pressing I'm
not.

Cochran watches. Jane begins to trust herself --

JANE
I'm not putting any goddamn pressure.

COCHRAN
Very good.

BURNS (O.S.)
Doc!

COCHRAN
I have to go.

JANE
I expect caring for them whores'
business areas is a big damn part of
your income.

Some private drama enacts itself in Cochran to which Jane is
oblivious, a primitive, shaming fear. Cochran moves to collect
his bag --

JANE
So this is what you want me to do?

COCHRAN
Yes, and don't let anyone in.

JANE
Believe me, anyone tires getting in
here that's not you is going to be
damn fucking sorry.

COCHRAN
All right.

Inexplicably, uncomfortably, Jane finds herself liking Cochran
enough to try cracking a joke --

JANE
I may not let you back.

Cochran studies her a beat, leaves. Off Jane, looking at the
Little One --

CUT TO:

INT. THE GEM - SWEARENGEN'S OFFICE - DAY

Swearengen and Persimmon Phil flank Tom Mason, who's shit-
faced now and tearful --

TOM
That poor fucking kid. My poor fucking
brother.

SWEARENGEN
Terrible.

TOM
(to Persimmon Phil)
We should've stopped him from running
Phil. Every damn thing that kid does
on his own, he gets himself in
trouble.

Persimmon Phil gestures vaguely, hoping to convey resignation --

SWEARENGEN
Anyways, he's gone, and rest his
soul.

PERSIMMON PHIL
That's all.

SWEARENGEN
They shot him off his fucking horse.

TOM
Rest his poor fucking soul, and let
him rest in fucking peace.

SWEARENGEN
They butt into other people's
business, and make the business of
others their own, these bought-out
no-good cocksuckers.

Tom is forced to consider this --

TOM
Hickok, you're talking about?

SWEARENGEN
Big fucking shot that he is --

Swearengen, behind Tom, impatiently prompts Persimmon Phil
to run with this --

PERSIMMON PHIL
When he's standing in front of
somebody.

SWEARENGEN
Oh, one in his ear from behind I'd
like to see how fucking tough he
was.

PERSIMMON PHIL
That's right -- the cocksucker.

A knock from Burns and his entrance interrupt Swearengen and
Phil's momentum --

SWEARENGEN
(to Tom)
Hey. Rest your brother's soul.

PERSIMMON PHIL
That's all.

BURNS
Condolences Tom.

TOM
He's gone Johnny. I don't think you
ever met him.

BURNS
No.
(to Swearengen)
Doc's here Al.

Swearengen nods, moves toward the door --

SWEARENGEN
(to Tom)
Fuck Hickok and what he did to your
poop fucking brother.

Swearengen's gone. Tom looks to Burns --

TOM
My mother'll never fucking forgive
me.

Burns nods, taking his cue from the expression of solicitude
on Persimmon Phil's mug. Off which --

CUT TO:

INT. THE GEM - WHORES' ROOM - DAY

Trixie observes Cochran, who's examining an abscess on Whore
#1's arm --

COCHRAN
(to Whore #1)
This is festered now, 'cause you
won't take a flame to your damn
needle.

WHORE #1
I do Doc, every time before I use
it.

COCHRAN
Stop lying.

WHORE #1
Anyways, I'm quitting.

TRIXIE
They say you're looking to a Little
One Doc.

Cochran appears not to hear, looks to Whore #2, who's
lubricating her chamber of commerce --

COCHRAN
How's that unguent work?

WHORE #2
It's nice and cool on me Doc.

COCHRAN
I'm trying more lanolin.

WHORE #3
(to whore #2)
Give me a dollop of that.

Under which Swearengen's come in, addresses Whore #1 --

SWEARENGEN
How's that pussy-lotion feel? Should
I try some on my ass?

Cochran addresses Swearengen without looking at him --

COCHRAN
Al.

Swearengen talks to the back of Cochran's head --

SWEARENGEN
Will she live?

A beat --

COCHRAN
Who?

SWEARENGEN
The Norwegian kid. How many children
'you caring for?

COCHRAN
I'm not optimistic.

SWEARENGEN
I see.

Cochran hates himself for being too afraid to look Swearengen
in the eye --

SWEARENGEN
Does she speak English? What's she
got to say for herself anyway?

COCHRAN
Hasn't said a word Al, or been
conscious a second.

SWEARENGEN
Too bad. She could settle who killed
her family -- if it was road-agents
or the Sioux.

COCHRAN
I don't know nothing about that.

SWEARENGEN
But she does, see. That's the point.
She could settle it.

COCHRAN
I doubt she'll settle anything. I
doubt we'll ever even know what
language she spoke.

Cochran can't meet Swearengen's eyes, and it's this that
tells the saloon-keeper what he needs to know --

SWEARENGEN
Give every one of these girls a good
going-over Doc. Look to 'em like
they're your own.

COCHRAN
Don't you tell me my job. I see to
them I can see to the way I'm goddamn
able, and that's all I can goddamn
do.

Swearengen nods, exits. Cochran turns to Trixie --

COCHRAN
(re her bruises)
Let's see your face.

TRIXIE
Are you poorly Doc?

Cochran's shame and fear still work on him --

COCHRAN
Don't worry about me. I know what I
am and what I'm not.

WHORE #2
This extra lanolin's cool on me Doc.

Off which --

CUT TO:

EXT. DEADWOOD GRAVEYARD - DAY

Smith presides at Ned Mason's burial. Bullock and Star witness --

SMITH
Our Christ as he was crucified
addressed the thief who was hinging
by his side: "Verily, I say unto
thee, This day shalt thou be with me
in paradise."
(looks to Bullock and
Star)
Your ways are not our way O Lord. We
abide, the just and unjust alike,
under your tearless eye. Tearless
not because you do not see us, but
because you see what we are so well,
(eyes raised)
Lamb of God, who takest away the sin
of the world, send your angels to
welcome this body into paradise.
Lamb of God who takest away the sin
of the world, grant this soul eternal
rest. Amen.

Smith smiles his thanks to the witnesses, begins to shovel
dirt over the coffin. Bullock and Star move away. For several
beats Smith's sermon works in them -- its message of a divine,
indifferent forgiveness -- without rising to the level of
consciousness or an organizing principle. Then --

BULLOCK
Let's get that lot bought.

STAR
Let it sit some Seth. We'll go back
and see him tonight.

Off which --

CUT TO:

INT. GRAND CENTRAL HOTEL - GARRETS' ROOM - DAY

Cochran, having examined Alma, applies a compress to her
head. He puts a dark-colored bottle on the bedstand --

COCHRAN
I've replenished your medicine.

At the window, a shamed Cochran sees Swearengen leave the
Gem --

COCHRAN'S POV

Swearengen heads for the dispensary where Jane watches over
the child --

ALMA (O.S.)
Thank you Doctor. I'm very grateful
for your attention. I only wish my
symptoms would subside.

RESUME - COCHRAN AND ALMA

Cochran turns to her --

COCHRAN
If I said I would see to your
requirements whether you had symptoms
or not, do you suppose that would
help you to heal?

She opens her eyes --

ALMA
I don't understand.

COCHRAN
I believe you do Madam. I believe we
understand each other. There are
people in this camp in genuine need
of my attention.

He indicates the bottle of laudanum --

COCHRAN
Make this adequate to your purpose
for the next several days.

ALMA
Thank you Doctor.

Cochran contemplates leaving, pauses, hating himself, to
give Swearengen a clear field --

COCHRAN
Let me examine your eyes again.

Off which --

CUT TO:

INT. DOC COCHRAN'S OFFICE - DAY

Jane hears the door open. She leaves her post by the sleeping
girl to go see swearengen enter --

JANE
What do you want?

SWEARENGEN
Doc asked me to see your patient.

JANE
What for? What do you know about it?
Who the fuck are you?

Swearengen moves by Jane to see the girl --

JANE
Don't you fucking ignore me.

Swearengen turns to her, smiles --

SWEARENGEN
You don't want to interfere with me.

JANE
You think I'm scared of you?

His smile grows more friendly --

SWEARENGEN
Sure you are. And if I take a knife
to you you'll be scared worse and a
long time dying.

JANE
I ain't scared to die. I ain't scared
of nobody.

But she is afraid, and they both know it. Swearengen turns,
stares down at the pale and still Norwegian girl --

JANE
Get away from her. Leave that Little
One alone.

Swearengen ignores her. Jane puts her hand over her mouth,
starts crying --

JANE
Leave her alone you cocksucker!

His hand PINCHES the little girl on the underside of her
wrist. Her eyes open, stare up at him in pain --

SWEARENGEN
Hello.

Jane sobs hysterically, shamed at her terror of Swearengen,
her inability to help the girl --

JANE
Do it to me if you have to! Go ahead
and do it to me!

Swearengen, having found out what he needs to know, moves
past her --

SWEARENGEN
Why would I do it to you.

Off which --

EXT. THOROUGHFARE BETWEEN COCHRAN'S OFFICE AND THE GEM - DAY

Cochran comes around the corner, see Swearengen, who's come
twenty paces or so from Cochran's office. As if Swearengen
were the apparition of Cochran's every failure of will and
flinch from human contact or its living and embodied
consequence, approaching him now to call him to account for
leaving the little girl to Jane's protection so that Cochran
might protect his own fear. Cochran is moved forward by some
sense of relief that his failure and inadequacy are now
finally called to judgement, to find that, as he moves, some
contrary sense enters into him, even some hope that what
approaches him may not be judgment executed on his
shortcomings but possibility, this hope quickening his stride
until, as he reaches Swearengen, his movement is purposeful --

COCHRAN
Did you hurt her?

Swearengen considers him familiarly and with a reassuring
tone --

SWEARENGEN
No. No Doc. And she's better than
you thought. Her eyes are open.

Cochran considers Swearengen a beat, until it comes to him
that possibility is not in the thoroughfare but the improvised
wooden structure ahead of him. As he hurries toward this,
off Swearengen --

DISSOLVE TO:

EXT. THE CAMP - DUSK

Ellsworth stirs the contents of a stew pot hanging over his
fire. Snags a piece of meat from the pot, tosses it over his
shoulder --

ELLSWORTH
Don't think I don't know you're in
back of me, either. Majority of the
great Indian scouts learned their
craft at my knee.

He checks out the corner of his eye, confirming Driscoll's
dog is still behind him --

ELLSWORTH
Where's you boss anyhow? Did he sell
that New York City Dude a pinched-
out claim and head off somewhere
with the proceeds?

Ellsworth tosses another piece of meat over his shoulder not
quite so far away from him --

ELLSWORTH
I wouldn't've though him the sort to
leave a dog behind.

He pokes at the embers of his fire, notes the mongrel, whose
fear of him as diminished, in closer proximity --

ELLSWORTH
Even one ugly as you.

Off which --

CUT TO:

INT. DOC COCHRAN'S OFFICE - DUSK

Cochran and Jane --

JANE
I fell apart. I couldn't look out
for the Little One. That fucker looked
at me and I fell apart in front of
him.

COCHRAN
All right. You're not the first.

JANE
No I'm not the first. Who said I was
the first? You think he's the fucking
first? I've been fucked plenty, and
tougher fucks than he was, and littler
than her by plenty. They fucked me
plenty, so you can go fuck yourself.

He looks away, the only comfort he can give her --

COCHRAN
Go ahead now. Leave her to me.

JANE
Was he a road-agent? Was he among
them that did for her family?

COCHRAN
(shakes his head no)
He owns the Gem Saloon.

JANE
Then what's it to him if she can
open her eyes.

COCHRAN
Go ahead.

JANE
Does road-agents work for him?

COCHRAN
(emphatic impatience)
I'll take care of her.

She readies to leave --

JANE
I'm sorry. I apologize.

COCHRAN
You got nothing to apologize for.
You got a gift for this. You cared
for her real good.

JANE
Don't be mean.

COCHRAN
No, you got a gift.

Jane leaves. Off Cochran --

CUT TO:

INT. GRAND CENTRAL HOTEL - LOBBY - NIGHT

Farnum at the lobby desk. Brom comes in, dirty and tired --

FARNUM
Mr. Garret. How was your day at the
digs?

-- doing his best to dissemble both abject despair and a
scheme to unload his troubles --

BROM
A mixed experience Mr. Farnum. My
claim retains every bit if its
promise, but I'm afraid I've injured
my back.

FARNUM
All that twisting and turning.

BROM
It's wrenched at least, and I fear
something worse. I may not be cut
out for this sort of activity.

FARNUM
Many aren't.

Brom leans in to confide --

BROM
Under the circumstances, perhaps I
should reconsider.

Farnum leans in as well --

FARNUM
What, Sir?

BROM
However reluctantly. In light of my
physical difficulties.

FARNUM
I don't take your meaning Mr. Garret.

BROM
I refer to your offer on my gold
claim.

FARNUM
My offer?

BROM
Last night Mr. farnum, before
witnesses at the Gem Saloon, you
offered sixteen thousand dollars.

FARNUM
I see.

BROM
I'm prepared to reconsider.

FARNUM
I have a confession to make Mr.
Garret. I have a weakness for spirits.

Brom studies him --

BROM
Are you saying you were drunk last
night?

FARNUM
I must've been Sir. I black out. No
memory at all of my actions. Please
ignore any offers made while in my
condition.

BROM
And yet you didn't seem drunk.

FARNUM
I suppose that's why I'm such a danger
to myself.

Farnum only half-tries to sell this; Brom begins to sense
how utterly he's beyond his depth --

CUT TO:

INT. NUTTALL'S NUMBER TEN - NIGHT

Hickok's playing cards with the same crew from the night
before. Utter comes in, careful not to look in Hickok's
direction, bellies up to the bar. Tom Nuttall comes to serve
him --

NUTTALL
There you are.

UTTER
'Evening.

NUTTALL
I've been wondering where you got
to. I seen Mr. Hickok come in but
then I didn't see you.

Utter nods, downs the shot Nuttall's poured him --

NUTTALL
You fellas had a busy time of it
last night.

UTTER
Busy enough.

Utter keeps himself from looking in Hickok's direction.
Nuttall notices --

NUTTALL
D'you raise that topic with Mr. Hickok
you and me talked about? --

UTTER
It's not going to work out.

NUTTALL
'Far as him gambling here exclusive?

UTTER
He wants to be a free agent. Come
and go as he pleases.

NUTTALL
I could raise the ante a little.

UTTER
I said it's not going to work.
(beat)
How's he doing anyway?

NUTTALL
He took a hundred twenty-five credit.
Fifty, fifty again, and then twenty-
five.

Utter nods, unsurprised, puts down money for his drink --

UTTER
I'm good for the one twenty-five.
Anything past that, you're on your
own hook.

He walks out. Off Nuttall, looking toward Hickok --

CUT TO:

INT. THE GEM - SWEARENGEN'S OFFICE - NIGHT

Dority's with him --

DORITY
Jesus Christ Almighty Al.

SWEARENGEN
'Far as that sewer-mouth friend of
Hickok's that's playing nurse, you
can tip her over with a feather.

DORITY
A little girl -- that's a tough one
on my conscience.

SWEARENGEN
We could let her spread word folks
got road-agents to fear more'n Indians --
breed mistrust, one white for another,
through the whole fucking camp. That'd
be another option.

Persimmon Phil comes in?

SWEARENGEN
Is he ready?

PERSIMMON PHIL
Tom's ready Al but he's awful drunk.
I don't trust him to pull it off.

SWEARENGEN
It's not a bank-job. He walks up to
the cocksucker and puts one in his
ear.

PERSIMMON PHIL
If he runs his mouth like he is now,
Hickok'll never let him close enough.

A knock. Swearengen slams his hand on the table --

SWEARENGEN
Who in fuck is it?

Johnny Burns looks in --

BURNS
Them hardware guys are asking for
you downstairs Al.

SWEARENGEN
Tell 'em I'll be fucking down.

Cowed, Burns nods, closes the door. Swearengen gets to his
feet --

SWEARENGEN
(to Persimmon Phil)
Pour coffee in Tom then bring him to
see me, 'cause he is going out tonight
to murder that son-of-a-bitch.

Swearengen heads for the door, look to Dority --

SWEARENGEN
Where do you and me stand?

DORITY
(nods, defeated)
We're all right.

Swearengen exits --

PERSIMMON PHIL
(to Dority)
What're you supposed to do?

DORITY
Nothing.

Off Dority, averting his gaze --

CUT TO:

INT. DOC COCHRAN'S OFFICE - NIGHT

Cochran and the little girl. He's changing her compresses.
The Little One's eyes are open. She's more comfortable --

COCHRAN
Never speak to nobody. If you can
understand me, don't show it.

After a beat, the girl speaks, frail-voiced, in her native
tongue --

COCHRAN
All right. If you have to talk, talk
like that.

Cochran moves his shotgun closer to him --

COCHRAN
You're going to be all right.

CUT TO:

INT. THE GEM - SALOON - NIGHT

Bullock and Star at a table, note Swearengen's coming down
the stairs --

STAR
See if this makes sense to you Seth.
I do the talking.

BULLOCK
Fine with me.

STAR
Some people don't get along. If they
have business to do with each other,
they find a way around it.

BULLOCK
Don't talk to me like I'm five Sol.

Swearengen's reached them --

SWEARENGEN
Boys.

Bullock gets to his feet --

BULLOCK
'Evening. Sol's got my proxy.

Swearengen takes this in --

SWEARENGEN
Meaning him and me should talk without
you.

BULLOCK
That's what it means.

Bullock heads for the bar. Swearengen exchanges a look with
Trixie as he and Star seat themselves. B.g., we see Trixie
move in Bullock's direction --

SWEARENGEN
What's your partner so mad about all
the time?

STAR
He's not mad.

SWEARENGEN
Then he's got a mean way of being
happy.

STAR
'Far as offering on your lot Mr.
Swearengen, we'd probably go seven-
fifty.

SWEARENGEN
You'd probably go a thousand.

STAR
Say we would. Does a thousand get it
done?

A beat --

SWEARENGEN
My concern Sol -- you mind if I call
you Sol?

STAR
Please do.

SWEARENGEN
My concern, anything can happen under
a tent. A hardware operation could
turn into a gambling joint, ain't
that right?

STAR
That's not going to happen Mr.
Swearengen.

SWEARENGEN
Sell to you boys outright, I could
be installing my own eventual
competition in a prime location,
with the A number-one man-killer in
the west holding an unnamed piece of
their action.

STAR
We met Hickok by coincidence. He's
not an unnamed partner.

SWEARENGEN
So you say. But a camp like this
Sol, no law or enforceable contracts,
you want to watch a man a little
while 'til you see what his word
counts for. So s'pose we value the
lot at a thousand, you boys pay me
five hundred, and whatever use you
put that lot to between now and the
first snow, I'm in for half the net.
Come October we finish out the deal,
all knowing each other better.

STAR
Seth won't accept it Mr. Swearengen.

SWEARENGEN
I thought you had his proxy.

STAR
Just up to a point.

SWEARENGEN
See that ain't my sense of a proxy.
That's what I'd want these few months
for, till we agreed what things mean.

STAR
I'm telling you, we're just a hardware
operation.

SWEARENGEN
You heard my offer.

Star moves off. Trixie joins Swearengen --

TRIXIE
(re Bullock)
He didn't want to drink and he didn't
want to fuck.

Swearengen looks toward Bullock --

SWEARENGEN
Anyone, or just you?

TRIXIE
Anyone.

Swearengen doesn't like it --

ANGLE - STAR AND BULLOCK

at the bar --

STAR
We pay five hundred now, he gets
fifty percent of our net till the
first snow, then we buy out the rest
of his interest.

BULLOCK
No.

STAR
It's a great location Seth. He wants
to be sure we don't turn it to
gambling, or Hickok's not in with
us.

BULLOCK
I won't be partners with him.

STAR
We wouldn't be after October.

BULLOCK
I won't be partners.

Bullock heads for Swearengen --

SWEARENGEN
You've got Trixie all distressed,
she wanted to give you a ride.

BULLOCK
A thousand now. If anyone in that
tent or the building we put up turns
a playing card or pours a drink or
offers a woman's services, you get
title back and keep our fucking money.

Under which Persimmon Phil has brought the provisionally
sobered-up Tom Mason downstairs for Swearengen's approval --

TOM
I'm ready to go Al.

SWEARENGEN
(re Bullock)
Let me finish with him.

PERSIMMON PHIL
C'mere Tom.

TOM
I'm absolutely fucking ready.

They move away. Swearengen considers Bullock --

SWEARENGEN
What makes you talk to me in that
tone of voice?

BULLOCK
I'm making a counter-offer.

SWEARENGEN
(rubs his neck)
You come into camp, rent my lot,
inside six hours you put one in a
guy's eye, with Wild Bill Hickok
backing your play. Next day I'm
supposed to sell you my lot and put
you in business and not ask who in
fuck you are and what the fuck you're
doing here.

BULLOCK
'Far as what happened in the street
with Bill Hickok being involved,
that was a turn of events.

SWEARENGEN
What?

BULLOCK
It was a turn of events.

SWEARENGEN
A turn of events. Your partner called
it a coincidence. So with this
coincidence and turn of events
involving you and this man-killer
staring me in the fucking face, and
while I've got five other fucking
things I'm supposed to be paying
attention to, even so I make a
sensible proposal, and you answer by
insulting me in my own joint.

Star's come to join them --

STAR
Seth didn't mean to insult you Mr.
Swearengen.

SWEARENGEN
You don't know nothing about it. You
weren't here and you don't have his
proxy, so why don't you do whatever
you people do when you're not running
your mouths and trying to cheat honest
people out of what they earn by
Christian work.

BULLOCK
You don't want to be talking that
way.

SWEARENGEN
Don't tell me how to talk in my own
fucking place!

It explodes from Swearengen --

SWEARENGEN
And here's my counter-offer to your
counter-offer: go fuck yourself.

STAR
Come here Seth.

They could go at each other right then --

STAR
(quietly)
Seth.

Swearengen's eyes never leave Bullock --

SWEARENGEN
(to Star)
Get him away from me.

But Star knows better than to intercede further. Another
beat, then --

TRIXIE
(to Bullock)
Mister, the best bath and blow-job
you ever had's not twelve steps up
those stairs.

She says it, not expecting Bullock to accept, but, by
interposing herself, to disrupt whatever magnetism draws
Bullock and Swearengen violently toward each other. It works.
Bullock turns, walks away. Star follows. As Persimmon Phil
and Tom Mason move to rejoin him --

TOM
Phil talked to me Al --

SWEARENGEN
Shut up.

TOM
-- I got the play.

PERSIMMON PHIL
Just listen to Al Tom.

Swearengen Addresses Johnny Burns --

SWEARENGEN
Is he still over there?

BURNS
Hickok? At Nuttall's? He's still
there Al -- still playing cards.

SWEARENGEN
Make it simpler Johnny -- go find
that newspaper cocksucker and announce
the entire fucking plan to him so he
can put it in his paper.

As Burns averts his gaze, shame-faced, Swearengen looks to
Persimmon Phil and Mason --

SWEARENGEN
(to Tom)
You walk up to Hickok, you're an
ordinary guy.

TOM
He don't know I'm the guy whose
brother he killed --

SWEARENGEN
That's your edge.

TOM
The cocksucker.

SWEARENGEN
You don't want to lose that edge.
That's what to keep in mind. 'Much
as you may want to say something,
your big opportunity is keep your
fucking mouth shut till you do what
you're there to do.

TOM
I only wish someone'd point out the
other cocksucker that did for Ned
with Hickok, 'cause I'd settle that
cocksucker's hash for him too.

This lack of focus in Tom's thinking discourages Swearengen --

SWEARENGEN
Jesus Mary and Joseph.

PERSIMMON PHIL
Don't worry about that now Tom.

SWEARENGEN
Give him another fucking cup of
coffee.
(to Tom)
One more cup of coffee, then Phil's
going to walk you to Nuttall's.

TOM
I'll take it from here. Only I'd
just like to say to him one fucking
time while he still draws fucking
breath Al, "Here Hickok, this is for
my brother Ned."

Swearengen suppresses the impulse to kill Tom Mason where he
stands --

SWEARENGEN
Wait. Wait. When you're covered with
his blood and brains say those exact
words.

Off which --

CUT TO:

EXT. NUTTALL'S NUMBER TEN - NIGHT

Bullock and Star walking. After a beat, Star stops, considers
his friend --

STAR
Listen to me Seth. This camp is a
going concern. We could secure our
futures here. Hardware could just be
the start. Top of my head, we could
set up a freight operation, pay to
restock our inventory off the fees
from other freight...

BULLOCK
Camp needs a bank.

STAR
The camp also needs a bank, is exactly
damn right.

BULLOCK
Every tent with a scale charges
interest on exchange.

STAR
Five percent, gold to currency and
currency back to gold.

BULLOCK
Charge one percent, you'd have capital
to make loans.

Now Star studies his friend --

STAR
Seth, if you see all these
possibilities, why get sidetracked
by that saloon-keeper? We just want
to buy his lot.

A beat, then --

BULLOCK
What about what he called you?

STAR
I've been called worse by better.

BULLOCK
Get it in writing from the son-of-a-
bitch, we buy the other half in
October.

STAR
You just leave it to me.

Bullock looks away, to where Charlie Utter, pissing against
the side of Nuttall's, leaning forward, one hand braced
against the side of the building, has just achieved a
stentorian emission of flatus, renewing the strength of his
stream; Utter, looking over his shoulder with an animal's
guilty pleasure to determine if he's been heard, meets
Bullock's gaze --

UTTER
'Evening.

BULLOCK
'Evening.

UTTER
Bill and me didn't make it to your
tent.

BULLOCK
Tomorrow's another day.

Utter shakes his head --

UTTER
Prospect -- his express purpose coming
to this camp. Make a stake for his
new wife -- his idea. But don't
suggest buying a shovel or a sifting
cradle. Don't herd him like a damn
steer.
(passing gas again;
possibly mudding his
longjohns)
Uh-oh.

Tom Mason and Persimmon Phil walk past them, enter Nuttall's --

STAR
Anyways, have a good evening.

UTTER
What's the secret Bullock?

BULLOCK
What do you mean?

UTTER
You've got some of Bill's qualities,
but then you got something he's
missing.

Utter situates his schwanz inside his pants, liberating his
hands --

UTTER
(itemizes on his
fingers)
Get along in the world. Turn a dollar.
Look out for yourself.
(raises his eyes)
He don't know how to do it. See what
I'm saying? I'd like to know your
secret and then I could tell it to
Bill.

BULLOCK
I don't know any secrets.

UTTER
Don't tell me if you don't want to.
Find occasion and tell him yourself.
He likes you.

Utter turns, supported now by the side of Nuttall's as he
swigs from his bottle --

UTTER
Just don't wait too long.

Bullock and Star tip their hats to Utter, head into the
saloon. HOLD ON Utter a beat, looking up at the night sky --

JANE (O.S.)
They throw you out?

She drunk too, clambering up the incline from the creek behind
the saloon --

UTTER
No they did not. I left on my own
steam. I choose to be out here.

JANE
Well I was drinking by the goddamn
creek out of my own fucking free
will. Where's Bill?

UTTER
Inside, losing at cards.

Jane nods, swigs from her bottle, heads for the adjoining
alley --

JANE
Someone I need to go kill.

EXT. ALLEY - CONTINUOUS

Jane appears. Utter follows --

UTTER
Who?

JANE
You are not my target but keep
bothering me and I'll add you to the
list.

UTTER
Who're you talking about, damnit!

She nods vaguely in the direction of the Gem --

JANE
The greasy-haired limey cocksucker
that runs the Gem saloon.

UTTER
What do you need to kill him for?

JANE
To show him it's two different things
between a coward and a lapse of
momentary fear.

UTTER
You listen to me Jane. I don't know
what you're talking about, but I can
guaran-fucking-tee 'you have at that
man you won't come out of that joint
alive, so I suggest you don't do it.

JANE
The sun ain't rose on the day when I
pay heed to what you say.

Jane struggles not to cry. Utter panics --

UTTER
What's this now?

She looks away --

JANE
He scared me Charlie. I ain't been
scared since I was a little girl.

She weeps --

UTTER
Oh Jesus.

He looks away, pats the air in the general direction of her
shoulder --

UTTER
All right then. There there.

Off which --

CUT TO:

INT. NUTTALL'S NUMBER TEN - NIGHT

Hickok, Con Stapleton, Jack McCall, Lou Varnes playing poker --

ANGLE - PERSIMMON PHIL AND TOM MASON

at the bar. After a beat --

PERSIMMON PHIL
How do you feel?

TOM
One more shot. And maybe one more
cup of coffee.

Hickok sees Bullock, rises --

HICKOK
I'm out for a couple.

MCCALL
(breaking balls)
Go get you some more ammo Wild Bill,
that kind of luck's bound to turn.

Hickok studies him --

HICKOK
Your name's Jack?

MCCALL
Correct.

HICKOK
What're you in the game for Jack?

MCCALL
What'm I in it for?

HICKOK
If irritating me's what you're after,
you can quit playing now, 'cause you
got the job done.

Hickok moves toward the bar. HOLD ON McCall as his features
transmute from frightened intimidation to a triumphant grin;
looking to his comrades, he widens his eyes as much as his
drooped left lid permits, puckers his mouth like a fish out
of water --

ANGLE - HICKOK

joining Bullock and Star --

HICKOK
Montana
(to Star)
'Evening.

STAR
'Evening.

HICKOK
(to Nuttall)
What'd be your opinion 'far as me
getting another fifty?

NUTTALL
You want another fifty in credit?

HICKOK
If that's all right with you.

NUTTALL
I suppose.

Nuttall's tone is identifiably less solicitous and supportive.
He turns to get the chips --

HICKOK
(to Bullock)
Play poker?

BULLOCK
I'm not good at it.

HICKOK
And you let that slow you down?

At the edge of his field of vision, Hickok notes what Tom
Mason himself does not realize -- that Mason so getting up
nerve to make his move. For a coward like Mason, this means,
not entering into readiness, but being gradually overwhelmed
by an anxiety which only striking out can relieve --

HICKOK
(to Bullock)
Fella over in the corner intends me
harm. Come to that, would you keep
an eye on his friend?

BULLOCK
Yes.

HICKOK
See who I mean?

BULLOCK
Yes Sir.

HICKOK
Thanks Montana.

Nuttall's back with Hickok's chips --

NUTTALL
I wouldn't want the water getting no
deeper then this Mr. Hickok.

HICKOK
Fair enough.

Hickok nods to Bullock, moves away --

BULLOCK
Stand away from me Sol. Over by my
right.

Star's thrilled --

ANGLE - THE POKER TABLE

Jack McCall, eyeing Hickok's approach, resumes his fish
imitation --

STAPLETON
Don't get too stupid Jack.

McCall makes his mouth more human --

MCCALL
(to Hickok)
Restored to our bosoms.

As Hickok resumes his seat --

CUT TO:

EXT. CORNER - NIGHT

Jane and Utter on post at the crossroads of the camp
thoroughfares. Dority exits the Gem on his murderous route
to Cochran's cabin. Noting Jane at the corner of his vision,
he glances at her in cursory fashion, dispensing any concern
that, As Swearengen had warned, she might be protecting the
child --

JANE
The fuck you looking at?

She doesn't know Dority, assumes his gaze expresses the
intrusive, unwanted curiosity her appearance has prompted
since she was twelve. Dority's got no business with her,
moves past --

JANE
(mutters to Utter)
He's no fucking Adonis himself.

INT. DOC COCHRAN'S OFFICE - NIGHT

A knock on the door. Cochran takes up the shotgun, goes to
the door and opens it. It's Dority --

DORITY
Go on away from here a little while
Doc.

COCHRAN
I won't.

Dority studies him --

DORITY
Go on away. Go up and see to the
whores.

COCHRAN
No.

DORITY
You know I'll go through you if I
have to.

It's not a hundred percent persuasive --

COCHRAN
Let me remind you of something. Kill
me, you're up to your elbows in
snatches again like before I got to
this damn camp; caring for 'em,
nursing 'em day in and out, taking
Al's heat every time one of 'em's
poorly.

Dority looks to the night sky --

DORITY
Between that and a slit throat Doc,
which Al will give me if I tell him
I left that child here alive, you
know what I'm going to pick.

COCHRAN
Then do what you have to, 'cause I
ain't letting you past.

DORITY
Jesus Christ Doc. Jesus Christ. You're
pitting me against Al!

COCHRAN
So the fuck be it!

Dority wipes his mouth --

DORITY
I ain't going it alone -- you're
coming with me to make the case!

Off which --

CUT TO:

INT. NUTTALL'S NUMBER TEN - NIGHT

Tom Mason rises, downs what's left in Persimmon Phil's glass
of whiskey --

TOM
Here I go.

PERSIMMON PHIL
No words, and no gun till you're on
him.

TOM
Here I go.

Tom moves in Hickok's direction, silent and true to Persimmon
Phil's instruction. He's three steps away, just at the point
his brain has sent the signal to draw, when Hickok pulls his
gun and shoots him in the belly --

ANGLE - BULLOCK

hand to his gun, watching Persimmon Phil, who never makes a
move --

RESUME - THE POKER TABLE

The others have ducked; McCall's first to find his voice --

MCCALL
What the fuck.

STAPLETON
That man's gun never left his holster
Mr. Hickok.

HICKOK
(evenly)
He meant me harm.

TOM
(dying, to Hickok)
You killed my brother you mother
fucker.

HICKOK
And now I killed you.

Tom dies. Bullock's come beside Hickok --

BULLOCK
(to the others, re
Tom)
He was going for his gun. I saw it.

Jimmy Irons has seen it all, splits. Stapleton wants Hickok
to know he's not against him --

STAPLETON
A revenge-seeker. I guess he did
mean you harm.

Off which --

CUT TO:

EXT. ALLEY - NIGHT

Jane and Utter, still waiting at the "triangulation" point,
note Dority and Cochran moving away from Cochran's dwelling --

JANE
Jesus Christ. Jesus Christ Charlie.
Have we been asleep at the switch?

Jane starts in Dority's and Cochran's direction --

UTTER
What's wrong?

He follows her --

JANE
(re Dority, to Utter)
Has he got his arm on the Doc?

Jane stops twenty paces or so away from Cochran and Dority --

JANE
Are you with that ugly fuck of your
own free fucking choice Doc?

ANGLE - COCHRAN

COCHRAN
(calls to Jane)
Yes I am.
(to Dority, more
conversationally)
And I'd rather be lucky then smart.

Off which --

CUT TO:

INT. THE GEM - SALOON - NIGHT

Swearengen's at a table, has received Jimmy Irons' report --

SWEARENGEN
Word for word, what the hardware guy
said.

IRONS
The hardware guy?

SWEARENGEN
The hardware guy. Did you not fucking
tell me the hardware guy was standing
next to Hickok?

IRONS
The hardware guy says something like,
"Hickok's right, he was going for
his gun, I saw him go for it too."

SWEARENGEN
Something like.

IRONS
My tooth was paining me awful Sir --
but I'm certain that was the gist.

Swearengen's noted Persimmon Phil's approach --

SWEARENGEN
Get some dope from Johnny.

IRONS
Thanks an awful lot Mr. Swearengen.
This tooth's about brought me to my
knees.

Irons tips his hat to Persimmon Phil, moving away. Swearengen
looks to Persimmon Phil --

SWEARENGEN
Tell me one thing. When that idiot
made his move did he tip it?

PERSIMMON PHIL
Tom didn't say boo Al. Hickok just
must've smelled him.

Swearengen shakes his head, looking away, notes Cochran and
Dority as they approach the table --

DORITY
You're not going to believe what
fucking happened Al.

SWEARENGEN
What.

COCHRAN
That lunatic that runs with Hickok
absconded with that child. She must
be under his protection.

Swearengen takes this in, looks to Persimmon Phil --

SWEARENGEN
C'mere.

Off which --

CUT TO:

INT. GRAND CENTRAL HOTEL - GARRETS' ROOM - NIGHT

Brom's dirty, tired and discouraged. He's washing. Alma's at
her dressing table --

BROM
I may as well confide in you Alma.

Loaded, she has infinite patience --

ALMA
Of course.

BROM
I'm beginning to fear we've been
duped. Our gold claim may be
worthless.

ALMA
Really.

BROM
Driscoll, the seller, has vanished.
Dan Dority, my inside informant and
fount of all conviction, seems now
to have lost his enthusiasm. And
Farnum, our damp-handed host, who
last night bid against me, tonight
proclaims he was drunk.
(wipes his mouth)
I've begun to think even Al
Swearengen's name should be added to
the conspirator's list.

ALMA
How disappointed you must be.

BROM
I know -- I told you I believed I'd
found a friend in Al, but as I now
look back, Al not only presided at
the sale, he facilitated my
involvement at every turn.

ALMA
I suppose a community such as this
draws a certain type of man.

BROM
Alma, I've mentioned to you exchanging
hellos with Wild Bill Hickok in the
hotel hallway.

ALMA
You've said he seemed very civil.

BROM
Very friendly, in the hallway and on
the stairs.
(beat)
Do you suppose we might enlist him
in our cause?

ALMA
Is that the sort of thing he does?

BROM
For a fee and percentage of monies
recovered? I'd think it's exactly
his line.

The thought of Hickok as an ally makes Brom's imagination
more punitive and confrontational --

BROM
I may well include the name of Al
Swearengen, when Wild Bill and I
confer.

Off which --

CUT TO:

INT. THE GEM - SWEARENGEN'S OFFICE - NIGHT

Persimmon Phil and Swearengen --

SWEARENGEN
You're sure that child doesn't know
what you look like.

PERSIMMON PHIL
To a moral damn certainty Al. We
never laid eyes on each other.

SWEARENGEN
(friendly)
She told you?

PERSIMMON PHIL
What do you mean?

SWEARENGEN
You know you never laid eyes on her.
But how in fuck can you be sure she'd
never laid eyes on you unless she
told you.

PERSIMMON PHIL
I misspoke. I'm confident that child
don't know what I look like, but I
can't guarantee it to a moral
certainty.

Persimmon Phil know's he's playing for his life --

PERSIMMON PHIL
And I know you've got a whole
operation to consider here, and you
don't need being worried or distracted
'far as her possibly recognizing me
even if it's the slimmest of slim
possibilities. So what should I do --
stay out of the camp till you deal
with this? Why don't I do that, and
you can have Johnny check under the
rock -- I'll put messages for you
under the rock... And I'll check
under the rock every day in case you
sent messages for me.

SWEARENGEN
Very prudent.

He's putting gold into the safe. Persimmon Phil rises --

PERSIMMON PHIL
Have I got time for a quick blow-job
before I go?

Swearengen turns back with a dagger, stabs Phil in the heart --

INT. THE GEM - SALOON - CONTINUOUS

Cochran and Dority have taken a table while awaiting the
outcome of Swearengen's private interview with Persimmon
Phil. After a beat, during which one or both might furtively
gaze in the direction of Swearengen's office where the
interview is taking place --

COCHRAN
It occurs to me, with Tom Mason dead,
Persimmon Phil's the last man upright
Al might worry that child could
identify.

The see Swearengen emerge for his office. He calls down to
Dority --

SWEARENGEN
Get up here. Bring the sled.

Dority rises, winks at Cochran with his right eye, the eye
Swearengen can't see. Off which --

CUT TO:

EXT. THE WOODS - NIGHT

The wagon Utter and Hickok and Jane came in on. Hobbled stock
nearby --

INT. UTTER AND HICKOK'S WAGON - CONTINUOUS

Utter prepares a pallet for the Little One, as Jane sings to
her --

JANE
Row row row your boat
Gently down the stream
Merrily merrily merrily
Life is but a dream.

She looks to Utter --

JANE
Goddamnit.

He's forgotten to take up the round. Now commences --

UTTER
Row row row your boat
Gently down the stream --

Jane begins her round as Utter continues --

UTTER
Merrily merrily merrily
Life is but a dream.

Off which --

FADE OUT.

THE END