"In writing fiction, the more fantastic the tale, the plainer the prose should be. Don't ask your readers to admire your words when you want them to believe your story." - Ben Bova [ more quotes ]

"Deadwood"

Episode Four

Written by

Elizabeth Sarnoff

"Here Was A Man"















Production # P104
(Script # S111)
Production Draft
Aug. 5, 2003
Aug. 12, 2003 Blue
Aug. 12, 2003 Pink
Aug. 13, 2003 Yellow



"Deadwood"

Episode Four

CAST



Seth Bullock
Al Swearengen
Sol Star
Alma Garret
Wild Bill Hickok
Jane Cannary
Doc Cochran
Tom Nuttall
Trixie
Brom Garret
Dan Dority
Charlie Utter
Ellsworth
E.B. Farnum
Jack McCall

A.W. Merrick
Johnny Burns
Lou Varnes
The Metz child
Con Stapleton
Leon
Cy Tolliver
Joanie Stubbs
Eddie Sawyer
Andy Cramed
Idler with Cramed's Portmanteau



"Deadwood"

Episode Four

SETS



INTERIORS

The Gem
Saloon
Swearengen's Office
Swearengen's Bedroom
Bullock's and Star's Hardware Building
Doc Cochran's Office
Nuttall's Number Ten
Grand Central Hotel
Lobby
Dining Room
Alma's Room
Hickok's Room
Utter's Room
Second-Floor Hallway
The Bella Union
Casino
Room Number Eight

EXTERIORS

Main Street
Main Street (Outside Cochran's Office)
Main Street - Bullock's and Star's Hardware Bldg.
Alley - Chinese-Operated Food Tent
Alley behind Nuttall's Number Ten



DEADWOOD EPISODE FOUR

FADE IN:

INT. BELLA UNION - NIGHT

An exhausted Hickok faces an exhausted and anxious McCall at
poker. McCall's wearing a new suit he'd bought after Bullock
threw him in the mud, but he hasn't washed. The other players
have folded but await the game's outcome. Tolliver and Sawyer,
and gamblers at various gaming tables, also watch. McCall
pushes a substantial pile of chips into the center of the
table --

MCCALL
Raise a hundred.

HICKOK
Back a hundred.

MCCALL
(to the onlookers re
Hickok)
Man's overplaying his hand.

McCall pushes all his remaining chips into play --

MCCALL
Whatever the fuck I've got left.

Joanie Stubbs, dealing, counts McCall's chips --

JOANIE
(to Hickok)
Four-twenty back to you.

Hickok counts out the appropriate chips, eyes never leaving
McCall, turns his cards over -- a pair of fours. McCall laughs
emptily --

MCCALL
As advertised. More nerve than sense,
huh Bill?

JOANIE
(to McCall)
What've you got?

McCall tosses his cards into the center face-down --

MCCALL
(to the onlookers)
He stays on fours -- and they call
this a game of skill.
(to Hickok)
You gutted me, didn't you Bill, you
son-of-a-bitch.

At McCall's profanity Tolliver steps forward --

TOLLIVER
(to McCall)
You were told about the talk.

HICKOK
Go eat Jack.

Hickok tosses a dollar chip to McCall, who, recognizing in
Hickok's eyes something like a pitying fellow-feeling, knows
at that moment he must kill him. He pushes his chair back,
rises, pocketing the dollar --

MCCALL
All right, thank you for that
kindness. You just bought something
with that.

As he moves past, Tolliver avers to Sawyer --

TOLLIVER
(re McCall)
Some boys can't be near a cliff
without jumping off.

Hickok's pushed his chips toward Joanie --

HICKOK
Twenty for the dealer -- much
appreciated.

She gazes at him evenly --

JOANIE
Any ideas for the rest?

Hickok shakes his head no --

HICKOK
(politely)
I believe I'll stay with cash.

Off which --

CUT TO:

EXT. MAIN STREET - NIGHT

Bullock is up carpentering. Hickok's exited the Bella Union --

HICKOK
Montana.

Bullock's a little embarrassed to be found working at three
in the morning --

BULLOCK
No rest for the wicked.

HICKOK
(grins)
But what're you doing up?

BULLOCK
It's cooler working now. Quieter.

Bullock decides to enlarge this oblique apology --

BULLOCK
Sorry you had to listen to them
drunken fools before Mr. Hickok,
when you and Mr. Utter was helping
us.

HICKOK
I come through unharmed. And "Bill"'d
be easier on my nerves. "Mr. Hickok"
makes me look for the warrant in
your hand.

BULLOCK
(grins)
All right.

Hickok's tied back his hair, climbs up to where Bullock's
working --

HICKOK
"Montana" okay with you?

BULLOCK
(nods)
Only other nickname I ever had was
"Sloth"

HICKOK
Don't seem to fit.

BULLOCK
Choice was among the Seven Sins. I
guess I got out before the others
surfaced.

As they're up in the air and can see around a little, Hickok
reacts to the growth of the settlement --

HICKOK
Camp looks like a good bet.

BULLOCK
My wife and boy are with her people
in Michigan. I hope I can bring 'em
out soon.

HICKOK
They'll get the Sioux making peace.
Pretty quick you'll have laws here
and every other damn thing.

BULLOCK
I'll settle for property rights.

HICKOK
Will you?

Hickok's tone is friendly, leaves to Bullock how to take
this --

HICKOK
I'm recently married myself.

BULLOCK
Is that so.

HICKOK
The missus operates a circus. She's
in Cincinnati waiting for word of my
success.

BULLOCK
Sol and I put our last sifting cradle
aside for you.

Hickok studies Bullock, touched --

BULLOCK
Why don't you go ahead and use it
Bill.

HICKOK
What slows me down is thinking about
freezing my balls off in a creek
working for the cocksuckers I'd lose
the gold to at poker.

Bullock looks down. Hickok looks away --

HICKOK
I'm flat out tired.

BULLOCK
Turn in. I've got her covered.

HICKOK
I believe I will. 'Night Montana.

BULLOCK
'Night Bill.

Hickok's climbed down --

HICKOK
My Pop called me "Kite."

-- makes an erratic bobbing movement with his hand. He walks
away. Off Bullock --

CUT TO:

INT. GRAND CENTRAL HOTEL - UTTER'S ROOM - NIGHT

Utter's up waiting for Hickok, who's entered --

UTTER
I was supposed to leave for Cheyenne
two damn hours ago.

HICKOK
What kept you Charlie?

UTTER
You don't fucking sleep. I don't
know what the fuck is happening to
you.

HICKOK
So you stayed in camp to tuck me in?

UTTER
If you don't want to prospect Bill,
I could put you in charge of this
mail route I'm getting --

HICKOK
I'm doing what I want to do.

UTTER
Bullshit.

HICKOK
'Some goddamn point a man's due to
stop arguing with hisself and feeling
twice the goddamn fool he knows he
is 'cause he can't be something he
tries to be every goddamn day without
once getting to dinnertime and not
fucking it up. I don't want to fight
it no more, understand me Charlie? --
and I don't want you pissing in my
ear about it. Can you let me go to
hell the way I want to?

Utter turns away, crying --

UTTER
Yeah I can do that.

He gathers up his things --

HICKOK
Good luck in Cheyenne.

Utter's gone. Off Hickok --

TIME CUT TO:

INT. THE GEM - SWEARENGEN'S OFFICE - FALSE DAWN

Swearengen is looking out the window onto the street. Farnum
is seated --

FARNUM
You know me Al, I don't scrutinize
or second guess.
(chuckles theatrically)
If you wanted to explain why I'm to
buy the Dude out of a worthless claim
I'd surely listen.

Swearengen reacts to what he sees outside --

SWEARENGEN
Jesus Christ.

FARNUM
What is it?

SWEARENGEN
(indicates outside)
The Dude must've had some kind of
accident.

Farnum joins him at the window --

THEIR POV --

EXT. MAIN STREET - CONTINUOUS

Dority leads a pack mule with Brom Garret's body slung over
its midsection toward the Grand Central Hotel --

RESUME -- SWEARENGEN AND FARNUM

Farnum keeps his voice neutral --

FARNUM
My word.

SWEARENGEN
Looks dead, don't he.

FARNUM
Yes.

SWEARENGEN
My reasoning was, get the Dude his
money back to keep him from asking
in the Pinkertons.

Farnum thinks he's got the play --

FARNUM
Appears now that's unnecessary.

SWEARENGEN
Make the offer to his wife.

An incredulous Farnum doesn't think he's got the play anymore --

CUT TO:

INT. ALMA'S HOTEL ROOM - MORNING

Alma Garret during her all-night vigil has moved a chair to
the window and seated herself, at some time thereafter has
rested her arms on the ledge and lowered her head; as she
has at intervals since, prompted from shallow sleep by sudden
unease of spirit, she raises her head, eyes opening to see --

ALMA'S POV SHOT - MAIN STREET

Dority ties the mule's lead-rope to a post, moves toward the
hotel entrance --

FARNUM (O.S.)
Al, once that dope-fiend throws her
skirts over her head and high-tails
back to New York, you think she's
going to give one wet fart about
what happened at this camp, let alone
send the Pinkertons out? And twenty
thousand's a lot of money.

RESUME - ALMA

as she rises, having recognized the body on the mule as her
husband's. Her hand covers her mouth, she turns away from
the window. She is at the mirror. She does not look at her
reflection, or at her hand as it moves to the laudanum bottle.
The shaking hand draws the opiate, delivers it to the water
glass beside the bottle --

SWEARENGEN (O.S.)
Let me say several things to you
E.B. First, twenty thousand is a lot
of money. Second, it's my fucking
money.

Alma's face stays turned away as the hand collects the glass.
She returns to the window, looks again at her husband's body
on the mule. Hears Dority's knock, in a spasm of shame drinks
the liquid. She shudders, moves to the door and opens it. He
holds his hat in his hands. His clothes are covered with her
husband's blood. His eyes are mournful and deferentially
solicitous, but she does not meet his gaze. Moves past him
into the hallway and down the stairs. Dority, relieved by
this thinning-out of his role, follows at a respectful
distance --

SWEARENGEN (O.S.)
Third, the widow, being a dope-fiend,
might let matters rest. But fourth,
when this camp holds a lot more than
twenty thousand for me as long as I
don't get murdered by the fucking
Pinkertons, why take the chance?

RESUME - SWEARENGEN'S OFFICE

SWEARENGEN
Now go see to the fucking widow.

FARNUM
All right Sir.

Farnum heads for the door. Off Swearengen, content, as the
dawn breaks, at not yet having spoken a word of truth --

CUT TO:

ALMA - ON THE STREET

beside the mule, examining her husband's body as if doing a
penance; Brom's face is bloodied and crushed. Dority, who
has followed Alma out, still holding his hat in his hands,
notes Farnum exiting the Gem, crossing the street --

RESUME - SWEARENGEN'S OFFICE

Swearengen's watching, brings his suspenders to his shoulders
and moves away from the window --

EXT. MAIN STREET - MORNING

Farnum's stopped at a demonstratively deferential distance
from Alma --

FARNUM
Mrs. Garret. What a tragic turn. Do
you require Doctor Cochran?

She looks to him --

FARNUM
To treat your terrible grief.

ALMA
Yes, I would like to see the Doctor.

FARNUM
Of course. Who wouldn't. I'll get
him right away.

ALMA
Ask him before he comes please to
examine my husband's injuries. I'd
like his opinion how they were
sustained.

FARNUM
I assume your husband died in a fall.

ALMA
All I asked you to do was get the
goddamn Doctor.

FARNUM
Of course Madam.

Alma starts up the stairs of the hotel porch, stops to
consider Dority --

ALMA
Is that what happened Mr. Dority? --
a tragic turn? -- a terrible,
accidental fall?

DORITY
I'm sorry.

ALMA
Oh yes.

She enters the hotel. Dority heads for the Gem, only the
most inscrutable of glances passing between him and Farnum,
who, having paused to observe the exchange, now yanks at the
mule's reins --

FARNUM
On, Stupid.

As Farnum leads the animal bearing Brom's body toward
Cochran's office --

ANGLE - BULLOCK

working on the hardware store building, watching Farnum's
progress --

CUT TO:

INT. THE GEM - SALOON - DAY

Dority enters. Swearengen's at the bar --

DORITY
She wouldn't have nothing to do with
me Al. Told E.B. to have the Doc go
over the body.

SWEARENGEN
I hope E.B. went to get him.

DORITY
He went.

SWEARENGEN
Her strong shoulder in time of need.

Dority's pouring himself a drink --

DORITY
Think he smells the gold?

SWEARENGEN
(shakes his head no)
E.B.'s too busy sniffing what he can
steal being go-between.
(looks to Dority)
Whereas you show me foresight Dan,
and loyalty, how you handled making
the find.

DORITY
I just know when I'm out of my depth.

Off which --

CUT TO:

EXT. STREET OUTSIDE COCHRAN'S OFFICE - DAY

Farnum, having led the mule bearing Brom's body along the
main thoroughfare to Cochran's office and gone inside, emerges
with the Physician --

FARNUM
(indicates body)
Amateur. Comes on a lark to dabble
and falls to his death from the ridge.

As they lift the body from the mule and carry it toward
Cochran's office --

FARNUM
Yet the widow suspects foul play.

INT. DOC COCHRAN'S OFFICE - CONTINUOUS

As they enter. They place the body on Cochran's examining
bench --

FARNUM
I know Al wants her leaving here
with as least of a sour taste in her
mouth as possible Doc...

Cochran's taking in the injuries to Brom's skull --

COCHRAN
Wouldn't you expect her husband's
death to be tart on her tongue no
matter how it happened?

FARNUM
Question's whether it's Fate she
blames or people in the camp.

Now Cochran's going over Brom's still-clothed body --

FARNUM
What're you looking for?

COCHRAN
Bullet wounds.

FARNUM
Any on him?

COCHRAN
No.

Cochran covers the body, prepared to head back to the hotel.
As they exit --

CUT TO:

EXT. MAIN STREET - DAY

Bullock's still working. Star joins him --

STAR
'Morning Seth. When'd you get up?

BULLOCK
I didn't go to sleep.

Bullock indicates Cochran and Farnum's progress toward the
Grand Central Hotel --

BULLOCK
The woman that newspaperman pointed
out to us yesterday just lost her
husband.

STAR
'Fella 'bought the gold claim at
Swearengen's saloon.

BULLOCK
(nods)
Innkeep just took the body down to
the Doc's.

Almost quiltily, Star allows his attention to turn to the
result's of Bullock's labors --

STAR
You weren't twiddling your thumbs
overnight, were you.

The partners consider the structure with growing pride.

CUT TO:

INT. GRAND CENTRAL HOTEL - LOBBY - DAY

Merrick, serving himself at the buffet as Cochran and Farnum
enter, feels a surge of hope he'll have company at breakfast.
Disappointedly watches them ascend to the second floor.
Returns to probing the coagulated oatmeal --

INT. SECOND FLOOR HALLWAY - CONTINUOUS

Cochran and Farnum stand outside the Garret's room. Cochran's
already knocked. She opens the door --

FARNUM
I've brought the Doctor.

ALMA
Please come in, Doctor.

She closes the door on Farnum as Cochran enters --

INT. ALMA'S ROOM - CONTINUOUS

Alma and Cochran --

COCHRAN
I'm very sorry about your husband.

ALMA
Was he murdered Doctor?

COCHRAN
I was told he fell from the ridge.
He had skull fractures consistent
with that. He'd not been wounded by
bullets or strangled -- no other
sign of foul play.

ALMA
Leaving how he came to fall.

COCHRAN
As to that I've no opinion.

ALMA
And yet in treating me Doctor you
were full of opinion. You took the
most comprehensive view.

COCHRAN
I said you needn't make up symptoms
to get the laudanum you wanted.

ALMA
Perhaps you don't feel at such perfect
liberty to opine on my husband's
case as you did on mine. Do other
considerations constrain you? Do
other men?

COCHRAN
I don't know how his skull got caved
in.

Cochran collects his bag --

COCHRAN
You're a bright woman, aren't you?
You must've been going through hell
here.

He puts a bottle of laudanum on Alma's dressing table, moves
toward the door --

COCHRAN
Get on home Mrs. Garret.

He leaves. Alma looks at the bottle --

INT. SECOND FLOOR HALLWAY - CONTINUOUS

Farnum, waiting in the hallway, watches Cochran exit the
Garret's room and close the door --

FARNUM
What's her mood?

Cochran only stares at him as he passes. Farnum's about to
knock, pauses as he hears glass smashing inside --

INT. ALMA'S ROOM - DAY

Having thrown the container of laudanum against the wall,
she stands weeping in futile confusion. After a beat, at the
sound of Farnum's timid knock --

ALMA
Who is it?

FARNUM (O.S.)
Mr. Farnum, Mrs. Garret. May I be of
further service?

ALMA
Once I've determined my plans I'll
certainly need a coffin.

FARNUM (O.S.)
I'll see to it.

ALMA
Thank you.

A silent beat. She's not sure if he's gone away. Another
knock, a little less timid --

ALMA
What is it?

FARNUM (O.S.)
Would you open the door Ma'am? I'd
like to say something to your face.

She collects herself, opens the door --

FARNUM
I'm overcome with remorse Mrs. Garret
that I failed to change the course
of events.

She stares at him --

FARNUM
It was me your husband outbid for
the claim.

She parodies his elevated locution --

ALMA
You who could've bought it later,
but begged off on grounds you'd been
drunk.

FARNUM
Intemperately raising my offer was
what I begged off on Ma'am. I've
never doubted drunk or sober the
claim was worth my original bid.

Against the deep intuition it's a mistake, she lets herself
pursue this --

ALMA
Which was what, Mr. Farnum?

FARNUM
Twelve thousand dollars Mrs. Garret.

-- feels an inevitable logic develop --

ALMA
And do you offer me that now?

Farnum acts as if he hadn't till this moment considered the
possibility --

FARNUM
If it will simplify your situation
in any way -- yes, I renew my offer
at twelve thousand.

She studies him --

FARNUM
I know it won't bring him back.

ALMA
No. We both know that.
(beat)
You'll have my answer shortly.

FARNUM
All right Madam.

Farnum leaves. Alma looks at the place on the floor where
the contents of the laudanum container have darkened the
wood. This instant's inaction compounds her fear. She quickly
moves into the hall --

INT. SECOND FLOOR HALLWAY - CONTINUOUS

Alma crosses to Hickok's room. She knocks on the door. It's
answered by Jane --

ALMA
Is this Mr. Hickok's room?

JANE
Who's asking?

ALMA
My name is Alma Garret. My husband's
just died under suspicious
circumstances...

JANE
Suspect someone else. When Bill's
killed a man he says so and states
his reasons.

ALMA
I don't suspect him. My husband had
tried to engage Mr. Hickok just before
his death, and I thought, though
they hadn't come to terms, perhaps
he'd be willing to advise me in my
present situation. I'd pay whatever
fee he thought appropriate.

JANE
To talk to you.

ALMA
(looks away)
I've no one else in the camp.

A beat --

JANE
I'll get him -- he's sleeping one
off.

ALMA
Thank you.

JANE
Sorry about your husband.

ALMA
May I ask your name?

JANE
Jane.

ALMA
Thank you Jane.

JANE
(moving off)
Wait in your room -- it'll take him
awhile to get the phlegm situated.

Alma nods agreement --

CUT TO:

INT. BELLA UNION - DAY

Cochran's with Tolliver and Joanie Stubbs somewhere on the
main floor. Tolliver's looking to build the relationship on
a broad base of bullshit --

TOLLIVER
I'm sure you don't need me explaining,
place like outs, a Doc in frequent
attendance can sow the seeds of doubt.

COCHRAN
All depends on your standards of
hygiene.

TOLLIVER
Oh we want 'em shiny, make no mistake --

COCHRAN
There's a wide range of normal.

Stubbs cuts through it --

STUBBS
Friday and Saturday morning and a
midweek day of your choice'd be right
for us.

Cochran appreciates her directness --

COCHRAN
I can work that out.

TOLLIVER
What does Swearengen pay for a visit?

COCHRAN
Twenty dollars per routine call, all
girls in.

TOLLIVER
And what's his idea of routine? --
once every three or four months?

Cochran just stares at him --

STUBBS
Lubricants.

Whereas he likes her --

COCHRAN
Armed and ready Madam.

Cochran goes, passing a just-entered gambler in a black frock
coat, maybe fifty, whose attire's the worst for the trail;
that it's not better dusted off, particularly as the gambler
seems to value an impression of focus and intention, suggests
some defect in his concentration or energy. The gambler,
CRAMED, carries his own valise; his portmanteau's deposited
by some just-hired idler, whom while visibly thinking of
more important things, he politely tips a dollar --

CRAMED
Thanks very much.

Tolliver approaches him as a stranger, greets him affably --

TOLLIVER
Howdy.

CRAMED
(a busy man)
Howdy yourself -- are you the
operator?

TOLLIVER
Cy Tolliver.

CRAMED
Name's Cramed. I'd like a room, I'd
like exclusive use of a safe, and
I'd like to shoot some dice.

TOLLIVER
And I'd like to think this is the
first day of a long friendship Mr.
Cramed -- we'll get you a room and
if you'll step into my office we'll
meet your needs for a safe. Help you
with your luggage?

CRAMED
Suitcase can go to the room.

TOLLIVER
I expect you'll keep the valise.

CRAMED
Keep what you expect to yourself and
you'll improve our chances at that
friendship.

Which has taken them out of public hearing --

TOLLIVER
Young man.

CRAMED
How are you Cy. Did some nice job
with this place.

Tolliver indicates the just-arrived Sawyer --

TOLLIVER
Eddie's work.

JOANIE (O.S.)
Hey Andy.

CRAMED
Hello Sweetheart.

Which is the first of his greetings Cramed has seemed to
utter with genuine pleasure. He wipes his mouth, looks back
to Tolliver --

CRAMED
Let's go, let's get something working.

SAWYER
We could rob Cy.

Tolliver laughs --

TOLLIVER
(to Cramed)
How about a bath first and a nap and
some sex with an unfamiliar woman.

CRAMED
Sure.

SAWYER
Signal when ready Commander.

Cramed's banter has sounded forced. He starts out, looks to
Sawyer --

CRAMED
If I didn't make my point I would
like to get something fucking working.

SAWYER
Sure Andy.

Cramed heads up the stairs. Tolliver looks to Joanie --

TOLLIVER
How's Andy look?

JOANIE
Like he spent three weeks on a wagon.

Joanie likes Cramed, knows any perceptual consensus of an
individual's weakness begins to invalidate him. Tolliver
looks to Sawyer --

TOLLIVER
Doesn't Joanie have kind eyes.

Off which --

CUT TO:

INT. THE GEM - SALOON - MORNING

Farnum and Swearengen at a table --

FARNUM
I'm optimistic Al. And she's promised
a prompt reply.

SWEARENGEN
I'd've thought she'd say yes on the
spot.

A thought seems to occur to Swearengen --

SWEARENGEN
You did offer the whole twenty.

Farnum appears to take umbrage --

FARNUM
How can you even ask me that?

The tone of Farnum's reply seems to prompt further doubt in
Swearengen --

SWEARENGEN
E.B.

Farnum can't hold it in --

FARNUM
I offered twelve --

Swearengen slams his hand on the table in a show of
exasperation --

SWEARENGEN
Did I ask you to play her? Can't you
follow one simple fucking instruction?

FARNUM
She will take the twelve Al and be
happy to get it, and all you'll have
to decide is how much of that eight
you saved should go to me.

SWEARENGEN
You're incorrigible.

Perceiving Swearengen as resigned, Farnum's cheerfully
relieved --

FARNUM
I do my best.

Swearengen produces several bags of gold dust --

SWEARENGEN
Weigh out the twelve. If she says
yes, there'll be something in it for
you.

FARNUM
Hint at the amount.

SWEARENGEN
Don't get ahead of yourself E.B.
When she's signed a bill of sale,
once you've come back and signed
that over to me...

FARNUM
(chortles)
It is your twelve after all...

SWEARENGEN
When all that's done I'd expect you'd
walk out with two thousand.

FARNUM
Fair recompense.

SWEARENGEN
For saving me money in spite of
myself.

Off which --

CUT TO:

INT. GRAND CENTRAL HOTEL - ALMA'S ROOM - DAY

Where Jane has brought Alma for an audience with Hickok --

ALMA
I suggested to my husband last night
that we should try to view our time
here as one experience bought at a
single price. Even now that he's
murdered I feel that -- to stake the
boundaries at just that fact isn't
possible. For one, this camp hasn't
laws or courts, and if it did I've
no evidence. I'd've tried to take it
all whole if they hadn't offered on
the claim. To receive their money
would be a separate matter -- make
me an accomplice of a different sort.

HICKOK
How've you been an accomplice till
now?

ALMA
A wife inevitably feels she's had
some part in whatever befalls her
husband.

She'd averted her gaze, now looks back --

ALMA
I'm answerable hereafter on different
terms. I need to know what I'd be
selling them.

HICKOK
You don't believe the money's to
keep the Pinkertons away.

ALMA
Why pay me? If it were ransom to
keep the Pinkertons off why not pay
it to Brom, instead of killing him?

A beat --

HICKOK
It's this saloon operator you think's
pulling the strings.

ALMA
Al Swearengen. It was certainly he
manipulating Brom.

JANE
A slimy limey cocksucker.

HICKOK
All right Ma'am. True sounding's not
guaranteed, but I'll try for a feel
of the bottom.

ALMA
What shall I pay you Mr. Hickok?

HICKOK
I'd prefer you pick the figure.

ALMA
Is a hundred dollars enough?

HICKOK
Perfect.

Hickok's past caring. Off which --

CUT TO:

INT. GRAND CENTRAL HOTEL - LOBBY - DAY

Farnum, behind the counter, watches Hickok descend, exit.
Watches him cross toward the Gem. Impelled by curiosity but
slowed by foreboding, Farnum starts this way himself. Merrick,
watching from the dining area, begins to hurry through his
meal --

CUT TO:

INT. THE GEM - SALOON - DAY

Hickok enters. Walks to the bar, addresses Dority behind it --

HICKOK
Whiskey.

Dority pours the drink as Johnny Burns heads up the stairs
to tell Swearengen. Farnum, entering, confirms Hickok's
presence --

FARNUM
(to himself)
Boy oh boy. My my my.

He takes a table near the door --

CUT TO:

INT. THE GEM - SWEARENGEN'S OFFICE - DAY

Leon, the disinforming dope-fiend faro dealer from the Bella
Union, has been briefing Swearengen --

LEON
Good now great, is how I'd describe
it Mr. Swearengen. Well-attended,
but we wasn't overrun.

SWEARENGEN
How did they take to the craps game?

LEON
Like chimps at their first fire.

Burns knocks, looks in --

BURNS
(to Swearengen)
Downstairs.

As Swearengen takes this in --

CUT TO:

INT. THE GEM - SALOON - DAY

Farnum, at the end of the bar farthest from Hickok, receives
a drink from Dority --

FARNUM
Thank you Dan.

He means for Hickok to hear this, to announce his presence
as benign. Hickok doesn't react. Farnum returns to his table
as Swearengen comes down the stairs. Merrick enters from the
outside, joining Farnum at his table as Swearengen approaches
the bar --

SWEARENGEN
I'm Al Swearengen Mr. Hickok, and
the last few days I've been locked
in my room weeping, searching my
memories where my path might've
crossed yours previous and how I
might've given offense, that you'd
stay in this camp not fifty feet
from my joint and never once walk
in.

HICKOK
No poker.

SWEARENGEN
It it that simple.
(eyes never leave
Hickok's)
Dan! Dismantle the titty-corner and
set up a poker table!

HICKOK
Not necessary Mr. Swearengen.

SWEARENGEN
I've always felt poker slows a joint's
action, been a liquor, pussy and
faro guy my entire fucking career,
but certain people are due respect.

HICKOK
This man Garret that fell off the
rocks?

SWEARENGEN
The Eastern Dude?

HICKOK
(nods)
His widow's had an offer on his claim
from that innkeeper sitting in the
corner. She's reluctant to sell till
she understands what's behind it.

Hickok never looks in Farnum's direction, nor does Swearengen --

SWEARENGEN
Why have you ask me?

HICKOK
She believes you'd know.

A beat --

SWEARENGEN
Her husband come here with childish
ideas. Buys himself a gold claim
with me an honest broker. Claim
pinches out, which will happen, but
he won't take that like a man. Needs
someone to blame, and the seller's
left camp, so the husband picks me,
says he'll bring the Pinkertons in
if I don't make restitution. I've
got a healthy operation here. I didn't
build it brooding on the right and
wrong of things. I don't need the
Pinkertons descending like locusts,
so I bend over for the tenderfoot
cocksucker: "Reconnoiter the claim
fully," I say, "and if then you're
still unhappy I will give you your
fucking money back." And the
tenderfoot agrees, and as he's
completing his reconnoiter the
cocksucker falls to his death. A
pure fucking accident, but up jumps
the widow in righteous indignation.
Wants the Doctor to examine him for
murder-wounds. My visions of locusts
return, I see the Pinkertons coming
in swarms --

HICKOK
Commissioned by the widow.

SWEARENGEN
Who I recognize is grieving, and has
better intentions probably then a
hold on the truth.

HICKOK
How does the innkeep come to make
the offer?

SWEARENGEN
(lowers his voice)
Under-bid when I brokered the sale,
and still believes in the claim --

HICKOK
(lowers his voice too)
Even though the gold's pinched out.

SWEARENGEN
The camp's expanding, and we just
had a hotel close. He sees the
property as real estate...

A beat. Their voices stay down --

HICKOK
I'll take this back to the widow.

SWEARENGEN
I only hope you show it to her in a
favorable fucking light.

HICKOK
What's that worth?

SWEARENGEN
What?

HICKOK
The light I show it in. What's it
worth to you?

A beat, then --

SWEARENGEN
Why, Wild Bill.

ANGLE - MERRICK AND FARNUM

trying at their considerable remove, to construe what's been
transpiring --

MERRICK
They certainly don't appear at odds.

Off which --

CUT TO:

INT. GRAND CENTRAL HOTEL - HICKOK'S ROOM - DAY

Alma and Jane await Hickok's return. The child's resting on
the bed. A beat, then Jane attempts to bridge the chasm
between her experience and Alma's --

JANE
What happened to that Little One was
the same, exact cocksucker.

Alma takes this in as best she can. Jane senses she has more
work to do --

JANE
Same as he was pulling the strings
on your husband's fleecing and getting
him killed, this Swearengen operated
the road agents that done for this
Little One's people.

ALMA
The poor child. To lose her family.
To see them slaughtered.

Jane feels some provisional sense of accomplishment at having
successfully communicated her thought --

JANE
Very same cocksucker.

She notes Alma's shifting uncomfortably --

JANE
If you people drink you look like
you could use one.

A knock --

HICKOK (O.S.)
It's Bill.

Jane rises, lets him in --

JANE
You didn't happen to put one right
between that shithead's eyes, now
did you Bill?

HICKOK
Unless you need the money right away
Mrs. Garret, I'd defer a decision
'til someone honest and competent
did a second reconnoiter.

ALMA
May I commission you?

HICKOK
(shakes his head no)
Some'd question my fitness on either
count but I'll guarantee you I'm not
competent. I do know someone I'd
trust to ask.

ALMA
I'd be very grateful.

HICKOK
Name Bullock. I'll go talk to him
now.

He starts for the door --

JANE
How'd you leave it with the cocksucker
Bill?

HICKOK
On terms he'd understand.

He's gone --

ALMA
(to herself, re
Penelope's ploy in
the Odyssey)
Maybe I should start weaving my
husband's funeral pall.

Without knowing what she's talking about, Jane knows it would
be good for Alma to keep busy --

JANE
Sure, go ahead. Want company? --
I'll bring the Little One over.

ALMA
I didn't actually mean I'd...

JANE
Or be by yourself if you want to.

Off which --

CUT TO:

INT. THE GEM - SALOON - DAY

Farnum's joined Swearengen at the bar --

FARNUM
Al, watching you even at a distance
was a pleasure and privilege.

SWEARENGEN
If she don't come to you with her
answer inside an hour, you pay a
call on her.

FARNUM
But Hickok's an ally, am I right. I
mean if that wasn't a fucking ally
leaving my eyes completely deceived
me.

SWEARENGEN
An hour E.B.

FARNUM
Yes Sir.

Farnum's gone, past Ellsworth, who's entered, approaches
Dority at the other end of the bar --

ELLSWORTH
Pour me a drink Dan and ask me the
key to long life.

DORITY
What is it.

ELLSWORTH
Most important human quality for a
person to reach old age.

Dority puts the whiskey in front of Ellsworth --

DORITY
Buy you a drink if you'll tell me.

Ellsworth downs his shot, grimaces --

ELLSWORTH
Same as a dog keeps his nose -- don't
poke it where it don't belong.

Dority whiffs where this may be going --

DORITY
Wise words.

Dority refills Ellsworth's glass --

ELLSWORTH
A lesson hard come-by, but thoroughly
learned.

Ellsworth looks around the saloon as if ruminating --

ELLSWORTH
But something else I know -- is my
knowing what I know and someone else
knowing it are two entirely different
things.

DORITY
I'm near losing the trail Ellsworth.

ELLSWORTH
Say someone thought I saw something
I shouldn't have --

DORITY
Whereabouts?

ELLSWORTH
On a ridge or wherever the hell else.
If it took me leaving camp to prove
I can mind my own business, it'd be
a friend who told me that instead of
throwing me to the pigs.

Ellsworth looks away, against a spasm of fear, and resolve
not to beg --

ELLSWORTH
Is my whole philosophy and outlook.
Make use of it as you will.

He leaves. Off Dority --

ANGLE - ANOTHER PART OF THE BAR

when Nuttall, mass of fears and mistaken certainties, has
found Swearengen --

NUTTALL
If he was here sealing an appearance
arrangement, I'm glad it was you
tied him up Al and not that new
fucking operation with their fancy
signs and cleaned-up women where I
heard he was gambling all night.

SWEARENGEN
We made no appearance agreement.

NUTTALL
You and Hickok didn't.

SWEARENGEN
No.

NUTTALL
I see. 'Cause his game at my place
yesterday was this far from coming
to lead, him and this droop-eyed
hoople-head, and I had to shut it
down. And if that gave him offense,
or umbrage, I can't worry about his
plans, where he decides to gamble
elsewhere, or this new joint
overwhelms the camp.

SWEARENGEN
We made no agreement.

Nuttall nods --

NUTTALL
What do think of that new joint?

SWEARENGEN
Nice sign.

Nuttall rubs his neck, makes ready to leave --

NUTTALL
(thumb and forefinger)
This far from fucking gunplay.

Off which --

CUT TO:

INT. NUTTALL'S NUMBER TEN - DAY

Con Stapleton, Lou Varnes, and McCall, still in his new-bought
green suit. Stapleton and Varnes are playing double-solitaire.
In McCall's exhaustion is an incoherence both vicious and
subdued --

MCCALL
Jack-fucking-high. That's what I
held, and I bet every fucking cent.

STAPLETON
Miracle to me's you sit here bragging
about it.

MCCALL
I'm not bragging, or a braggart or a
blow-hard. I state a fact and I live
by a fact.

VARNES
Anyways, it's over.

MCCALL
And you believe that because you're
a walking fucking cunt with your
cunt and eye moving.

VARNES
No matter now your day's gone Jack,
you're always fun to talk to.

MCCALL
Give me a buck then Lou -- send me
off for a meal. Give me a buck and
see what part of you gets shot,
because I possess a fucking gun I
didn't bet.

Thought of a gun in McCall's hand unsettles both Stapleton
and Varnes --

STAPLETON
I'll pay five dollars for that gun,
sight-unseen, because what you need
Jack is a stake to make your comeback.
That's what'd get you out of this
brown-study you're in.

MCCALL
I believe not.

STAPLETON
Or show me the gun and name a price
and if it's close to fair I'll pay
it.

MCCALL
I believe not. I believe no.

He's gone, past the arriving Nuttall, who casts a morose eye
on the card game, which generates in revenue for the house, -
i.e. Nuttall, exactly nothing --

VARNES
(to Stapleton, re
McCall)
He too is God's handiwork.

Nuttall's joined them --

NUTTALL
Double fucking solitaire. Where's
your fucking ball-gowns? Break out
the chips boys, and let's get a poker
game going.

As Nuttall takes a seat --

CUT TO:

EXT. MAIN STREET - BULLOCK AND STAR HARDWARE - DAY

Hickok, Bullock and Star inside the partly constructed
building --

BULLOCK
I don't know this camp. I'd have to
bring someone from Montana.

STAR
Would the widow give it that much
time?

HICKOK
(nods)
She don't want to be stupid or fooled,
wants to stand up for her husband
better'n he did for himself. Not
that she ought to stick around.

BULLOCK
'Far as that goes she could sign a
proxy.

HICKOK
There's her hundred in it and what
the saloon-keeper gave me if you'd
want to take it on.

BULLOCK
All right.

Hickok understands Bullock's agreement is a gesture of respect
to him. He gives Bullock Alma's hundred dollars and
Swearengen's hundred and fifty --

HICKOK
I guess she's all right 'til the
saloon-keep decides I'm not
trustworthy.

STAR
Trust ain't his long suit -- she
ought to be looking for a wagon.

Off which --

CUT TO:

INT. THE GEM - SALOON - DAY

Trixie and Dority. Ellsworth drinking in the corner. Dority's
miserable --

DORITY
I like Ellsworth too.

TRIXIE
There's a difference between talking
a lot, which Ellsworth does enjoy,
and overstepping.

DORITY
He don't get into other people's
business.

TRIXIE
Then what are we talking about Dan?

DORITY
My own standards on who's reliable
ain't the same as Al's.

TRIXIE
So Ellsworth has to leave camp over
the difference?

DORITY
He does if it's that or kill him. He
said to tell him if those were the
choices.

TRIXIE
Don't you do it.

DORITY
Which?

TRIXIE
Either.

Dority rises, moves away. Off Trixie, at the table --

NEW ANGLE - FARNUM AND SWEARENGEN

Swearengen's gaze is murderous, fixed --

SWEARENGEN
Asks a bribe to do something he never
intends. Takes my hundred fifty,
then tells her not to sell.

FARNUM
Why are you so sure he told her not
to Al?

SWEARENGEN
You went back there. You knocked on
her door.

FARNUM
She said he reported to her his
conversation with you but she wasn't
prepared yet to give me an answer.

SWEARENGEN
Does that make sense to you? That
she'd hire Hickok to come talk to
me, he'd go back and tell her to
sell, and then she'd say she wasn't
ready to make up her mind?
(wipes his mouth)
That idiot couldn't put one in his
ear.

FARNUM
If you're talking about Tom Mason,
I'd say that's water under the bridge.

SWEARENGEN
And I'd say Hickok has to die if I
have to kill him myself.

FARNUM
Jesus Al. Jesus. With all that's
going on? How would it sit with the
widow, for one thing. How would that
dispose her toward us?

SWEARENGEN
Let me pose you a question E.B., you
fucking cunt. If someone comes at
you, what're you supposed to do about
it?

Farnum marshals all his minimal nerve --

FARNUM
And I'll pose you a question back,
Al Swearengen. If a friend or at
least a professional colleague has a
mistaken impression of who's coming
at him and who isn't, what're you
supposed to do then?

The frightened screech with which Farnum concludes, first
emitted by the common ancestor of the bird and reptile, seems
to penetrate Swearengen's paranoid resolution --

SWEARENGEN
You don't think he's coming at me.

FARNUM
I don't think Hickok's coming at you
Al, no I don't. I think you're a man
with so many different
responsibilities you sometimes get
feeling beset, and in that frame of
mind take things personal.

Swearengen rubs his forehead --

SWEARENGEN
I'd sooner the cocksucker was dead.
Simplify working the widow.

FARNUM
We don't get to choose the world we
live in.

SWEARENGEN
Bella Union cocksuckers to worry
about and every other damn thing.

FARNUM
You've got a full plate.

SWEARENGEN
I need to fuck something.

Swearengen's gaze finds Trixie; he nods perfunctorily, first
at her then at his second-floor office. Trixie heads for the
office as Swearengen goes to the bar to collect a bottle.
Farnum rubs his neck, calling after Swearengen --

FARNUM
That's using the old noggin Al. Get
yourself some relief and let the
world do its own spinning.

ANGLE - DORITY

who's taken over from the other bartender, as Ellsworth hails
him uneasily --

ELLSWORTH
What's new Dan?

DORITY
Nothing.

ELLSWORTH
No news?

DORITY
If I had something to tell you
Ellsworth one way or another I'd
tell it to you.

ELLSWORTH
Then I guess I better have another
drink.

Off which --

CUT TO:

INT. BELLA UNION - ROOM NUMBER EIGHT - DAY

Cramed lies asleep on the bed. He's fully dressed, still has
his boots on. Starts, shamed, at Joanie's knock, struggles
to get his boots off --

CRAMED
Who is it?

JOANIE (O.S.)
Joanie.

CRAMED
Wait a second Honey, give me just a
second.

He give up trying to get his boots off. He splashes water on
his face, opens the door. Joanie enters --

CRAMED
I fell asleep.

JOANIE
I broke up three cat-fights Andy,
girls wanting to give you a bath.

CRAMED
I fell right to hell asleep.

JOANIE
You ready to get some strange?

His lower lip quivers --

CRAMED
Tell you the truth Joanie, I feel
out of sorts.

JOANIE
You had a long trip and I've heard
worse confessions.

CRAMED
That's gospel truth which I hope
you'll keep to yourself.

JOANIE
Sure I will Andy.

CRAMED
I feel fucking unwell to myself.

JOANIE
Why don't you lie back and let me
get your boots off?

He's getting fever, which makes his fear and worry more
conscious --

CRAMED
I'm not sure you ought to touch me
Honey, is the gospel on that score.

JOANIE
No girl in the world ever got sick
pulling off a pair of boots Andy,
but if you want I won't take more
liberties.

Off which --

CUT TO:

INT. BELLA UNION - CASINO - DAY

Tolliver and Sawyer with Merrick somewhere on the floor --

TOLLIVER
Fifty dollars an issue.

Merrick's red-faced with pleasure --

MERRICK
Frankly Sir, that would purchase
your advertisement an amount of space
wildly incommensurate with the
accompanying articles.

TOLLIVER
(to Sawyer)
See I've never heard that word in my
life --

SAWYER
That's his trade -- he's a wordsmith.

TOLLIVER
You shoot craps Mr. Merrick?

MERRICK
Excuse me? Oh, no, I haven't shot
the craps in some time.

SAWYER
(friendly)
Like ever?

MERRICK
If you'll keep my secret, no I've
never shot them.

They wait. Merrick gets an interesting idea --

MERRICK
(to his Muse)
I wonder if that would be an article? --
a man learns to shoot the craps?

Tolliver's seen Stubbs coming down the stairs; instinctively
sensing trouble, he wants to get Merrick out --

TOLLIVER
Anyway, we're agreed on fifty an
issue --

Merrick senses he's on an unprecedented roll of luck --

MERRICK
Had we? -- actually agreed? I feel
almost duty-bound to remonstrate...

TOLLIVER
(to Sawyer)
Three months advance Eddie, fifty an
issue --

Sawyer's seen Stubbs too and had he same premonition --

SAWYER
Let's see the man in the cage.

He's already steering him in this direction --

MERRICK
Seriously?

Tolliver calls after the journalist --

TOLLIVER
Don't let him take your monry Mr.
Merrick while he's teaching you that
game.

Stubbs is beside Tolliver --

TOLLIVER
Who'd you give to Andy?

JOANIE
Nobody. He's poorly.

SAWYER
Does he need a Doctor?

JOANIE
Maybe he does.

TOLLIVER
Goddamnit. I told you I didn't like
the way he looked.

Tolliver's waved two underlings toward him; as the arrive --

TOLLIVER
(to Minion #1)
Stand outside room eight. No one in
or out.
(to Minion #2)
Get the Doc. Tell him someone fell.

As the minions act on his orders, Tolliver looks back to
Joanie --

TOLLIVER
I told you.

Off which --

CUT TO:

INT. GRAND CENTRAL HOTEL - ALMA'S ROOM - DAY

Hickok's finishing his report to Alma --

ALMA
Thank you so much Mr. Hickok. I'll
look forward to Mr. Bullock's
contacting me.

HICKOK
May I ask Ma'am when you'd expect to
leave the camp?

ALMA
I'm not certain.

He takes this in --

HICKOK
Bullock's honorable Mrs. Garret --
you can trust him to see to your
interests.

ALMA
He couldn't come more highly
recommended.

He studies her for a beat --

HICKOK
You know the sound of thunder, don't
you Mrs. Garret.

ALMA
Of course.

HICKOK
Can you imagine that sound if I ask
you to?

She bridles a little --

ALMA
Yes I can Mr. Hickok.

HICKOK
Your husband and me had this talk,
and I told him to head home to avoid
a dark result. But I didn't say it
in thunder. Ma'am, if you linger in
this camp, you've got a real good
look at getting killed.

His voice suddenly takes on a admonitory intensity --

HICKOK
Listen to the thunder.

A beat, then he rises --

HICKOK
Very good luck to you.

ALMA
Thank you for all your help.

He's gone. Off alma, in that first stage of opium withdrawal
which is the nervous anticipation of physical sickness --

CUT TO:

INT. THE GEM - SWEARENGEN'S BEDROOM - DAY

Swearengen fucks Trixie. His gaze is distracted. He's got
her arms raised as if he's robbing her, pins her hands. She
watches him --

CUT TO:

INT. BELLA UNION - CASINO - DAY

Tolliver being joined by Doc Cochran --

TOLLIVER
Thanks for coming Doc.

COCHRAN
The boy said someone fell.

TOLLIVER
Room eight.

Cochran follows Tolliver's gaze to the second floor, notes
the underling standing guard outside Cramed's room.

CUT TO:

INT. UTTER'S ROOM - DAY

Hickok labors at his spelling and penmanship, writing a letter
to his wife --

HICKOK (V.O.)
My own darling wife Agnes: I never
was as well in my life, but you would
laugh to see me now. Look a fool, as
I just got in from prospecting.

A knock at the door, Hickok looks up --

JANE (O.S.)
It's Jane Bill.

HICKOK
Come ahead.

He puts down the pen, pushes the paper forward on the desk.
Jane enters holding the Metz child --

JANE
The Little One is cool as a cucumber.

HICKOK
Is that so.

Jane's brought the child to Hickok --

JANE
Feel this Little One's forehead.

Hickok does so --

HICKOK
Fever and you have parted ways Young
Lady.

The child smiles, answers in Norwegian --

HICKOK
(to Jane)
Did she just ask to borrow money?

Jane laughs, inexplicably blushes --

JANE
Anyways, how'd it go with Bullock?

HICKOK
He'll help the widow.

JANE
Good for him. Good for you. Did you
tell her so?

Hickok nods --

JANE
I'd keep her company but she's working
on her husband's funeral pall.

HICKOK
She wasn't about it when I was with
her.

JANE
No, huh?

HICKOK
Nope.

JANE
Think she'd want company?

HICKOK
I'll bet she'd enjoy yours.

JANE
Maybe she'd enjoy feeling the Little
One's forehead.

Jane lingers, as always, in his company --

JANE
You're probably enjoying your damn
privacy with Charlie headed for
Cheyenne.

HICKOK
(nods)
I'm writing my wife.

JANE
Why didn't you say something, damn
you!

She's heading for the door --

JANE
(to the child)
Owe you a penny.

HICKOK
See you later Jane.

JANE
See you later Bill.

She goes. Hickok sits at the desk again, resumes his letter --

HICKOK (V.O.)
Will go out prospecting again
tomorrow. I'm almost sure I will do
well. We will have a home yet. Then
we will be so happy. Here the man
is, hurrying me to get off the letter.
Goodbye my dear Agnes. J.B. Hickok,
Will Bill.
(beat)
P.S. -- if such should be we never
meet again, while firing my last
shot I will gently breathe the name
of my wife, and I will make the plunge
and try to swim to the other shore.

Off which --

CUT TO:

INT. BELLA UNION - ROOM NUMBER EIGHT - DAY

With Joanie b.g., Cochran completes his examination of Cramed,
who's now delirious with high fever --

CRAMED
Oh my back. Oh my aching back.

Tolliver's entered --

COCHRAN
(voice raised)
I'll give you something to ease that.

Cochran turns to his medical bad to produce this --

TOLLIVER
What's he got Doc?

COCHRAN
I guess his back's what he landed on
when he fell.

CRAMED
My back's split and broken.

TOLLIVER
I don't know when he landed on.
(to Joanie)
Who said he fell?

Cochran has no patience for the bullshit --

COCHRAN
(to Tolliver)
'Course if pus-sy sores raise up on
his face and trunk, more likely he's
got other trouble.

Joanie looks away --

CRAMED
Get me a game, the way I ache.

JOANIE
Okay Andy.

CRAMED
Did you lose your friend in the fire?

Off which --

CUT TO:

EXT. MAIN STREET - DAY

Hickok exits the Grand Central; he's dressed to play cards,
heads for Nuttall's --

EXT. AN ALLEY - A CHINESE-OPERATED FOOD TENT

McCall's served an American meal. Doesn't like any part of
the set-up --

INT. NUTTALL'S NUMBER TEN - CONTINUOUS

Hickok enters. Nuttall, at the poker table playing with
Stapleton, Varnes and a man we'll come to know as Capt.
William Massey, rises, delighted at Hickok's arrival, joins
him at the bar. Hickok's produced his wallet, removes the
cash he won from McCall, puts it on the bar to repay Nuttall's
advances and buy chips for the game. Nuttall's manner conveys
that the repayment was the last thing he had on his mind.
Given the owner's happy relief at what Hickok's re-appearance
augurs for the future of his saloon, this may even be true.
Nuttall's called to his bartender for chips, during which
Hickok comes to the poker table. Massey's in the chair, with
a full view of the saloon's front entrance, which Hickok
would normally occupy, but Hickok chooses not to make a point
of this, taking instead the seat already vacated by Nuttall,
who, now jubilantly rejoining Hickok, stacks before the
gunfighter the chips he's purchased. Stapleton's already
dealing --

CUT TO:

INT. GRAND CENTRAL HOTEL - ALMA'S ROOM - DAY

Jane's brought the child with her; they keep Alma company.
Alma's at the window --

ALMA
He was the best company, from the
time I was ever so little. Problems
or difficulties or even sadness...
No such things. Not permitted. The
evening I was presented to society,
I later found out he'd been able to
attend only by physically fleeing
some dismal legal difficulty. In
that sense, me marriage to Mr. Garret
was a tremendous solution. Tremendous.
At the ceremony I remember Father
whispering to me, "Darling, I can
never repay you for what you're about
to do, but I can repay everyone else."
And he said, "To think of you, with
him, in that godforsaken place, is
almost unbearable."

JANE
Meaning your husband.

ALMA
And I said, "Maybe he'll die."

She looks to the street --

CUT TO:

INT. THE GEM - SWEARENGEN'S BEDROOM - SAME TIME

His head turned to one side, Swearengen finishes fornicating.
Wondering at what she takes to be her destiny, Trixie comes
with him --

CUT TO:

EXT. MAIN STREET - DAY

Bullock and Star come to some milestone in the construction
of their building --

INT. NUTTALL'S NUMBER TEN - DAY

McCall enters Nuttall's. If Hickok senses his approach, he
gives no sign. McCall reaches the poker table, produces his
pistol and shoots Hickok in the back of the head --

MCCALL
Take that goddamn you!

McCall trains the weapon on the others in the saloon, moving
toward the back door; then he flees --

CUT TO:

INT. BELLA UNION - ROOM NUMBER EIGHT - SAME TIME

As Joanie stands in the corner, gaze averted. Pustulating
sores area raised on Cramed's face. With his eyes open, he
hallucinates some horror short of what is overtaking him --

CUT TO:

EXT. ALLEY BEHIND NUTTALL'S NUMBER TEN - DAY

McCall runs toward a saddled horse he intends to steal, jumps
to mount; the saddle is loose, and he brings it down upon
him as he falls to the mud. Of those who've pursued him from
the saloon, Nuttall is first to reach McCall, who, trapped
beneath the saddle, feels in the mud for the pistol he's
dropped; Nuttall grabs the weapon, yanks the saddle off
McCall, punches him once in the face as he brings him to his
feet --

EXT. BULLOCK AND STAR'S HARDWARE - DAY

Bullock and Star look in the direction of Nuttall's outside
which a commotion has begun; as moves toward them --

INT. GRAND CENTRAL HOTEL - ALMA'S ROOM - DAY

Jane has come beside Alma, watches with her this beginning
of focused activity on the street. Jane's eyes show some
premonitory sense of doom. She nods to Alma, indicating the
child, as she moves toward the door --

CUT TO:

INT. THE GEM - SWEARENGEN'S BEDROOM - DAY

As part of the slow, post-coital resumption of vigilance his
soul-sickness demands, Swearengen's wandered to the window,
sees Nuttall and the others from the Number Ten bring McCall
from the alley onto the street --

EXT. MAIN STREET - DAY

Bullock sees this too. He's already covered half the distance
from the hardware store. He's close enough to recognize McCall --

ANOTHER ANGLE - JANE

comes running out of the Grand Central, past Farnum, who
stands on the porch of his hotel, content to be no closer.
Jane rushes up to the group who restrain McCall --

JANE
What happened?

STAPLETON
He shot Wild Bill Hickok.

Off her --

INT. NUTTALL'S NUMBER TEN - DAY

Into which Bullock has been drawn by his Marshall's intuition
or some deeper fate. He approaches Hickok, slumped dead on
the table, blood pooling from the mortal wound in his head.
An after-death spasm shifts the body's balance; Hickok falls
to the floor. As Jane appears at the entrance to the bar,
Bullock kneels beside Hickok --

FADE OUT.



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